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Full text of "The Rainbow Magazine (Radio Shack Color Computer) (June 1985)"



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THE COLOR COMPUTER MONTHLY MAGAZINE 

MICRONOME! 



3ur Sounds and Music Issue 



-earn the Ivory Keyboard 
Store Your Voice in RAM, 
and 

'lay It Again, SAM Chip 

3ames! 

Launch a Chopper Assault 
Make the Martian Dance 
Name that Song, and 
Play Hi-G 



Projects! 

Wireless Joysticks and 

A CoCo Chronograph 




Graphics! 
Get Serious with Animatic, then 
Send in the Clowns 




tod Yta lm\ 



&. M,.Kl£ttM 




*p 



a* 



<C& ^ Experience 

rftf <0^ the ultimate 

v H u <A^ vide0 experience. 

o^'' c£ For the first time ever ' 

nJ3^ rt^ ,wo computers can be linked 

tf^Jv \P together with action and re- 

action at either location, or play 
alone. The P-51 Mustang was the attack 
workhorse during WWII. To experience the 
flight of this beautiful plane in actual combat 
situation will give many hours of excitement. You 
can test your skill against the computer to defend 
your position or try your hand competing against your 
opponent at any remote location. Two CoCo's can be linked 
by cable for TRUE two players adventure. With the use of a modem 
you can test your skill across town or across the country!! This pro- 
gram is another first from Tom Mix Software. Order your excitement 
today. Direct connect cable available separately when two computers 
are used at the same location. 



From Takeoff to Landing 




Actual Attack Screen View 

32K Machine Language 
Tape $29.95 
Disk $34.95 
Cable $10.95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

42B5 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS, Ml 49506 



ADD $2.50 POSTAGE & HANDLING • (CANADA ADD $3.00) 
• MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADO 4% SALES TAX • 
LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 



TOP ROAALTIES PAID 

(616) 957-0444 | 



WRITE FOR FREE CATALOGUE - MOST OF OUR INVENTORY IS NOT SHOWN HERE! 



after 



PLUS 



after 




Tandy 200 24K $ 739,00 
ModeM00 3K$339 

Model 100 24K $510 



L- «J 



Color Computer II 
w/16K Ext Basic $135 
W/64K Ext. Basics 179 




Tandy 1000 $999 
Tandy 1200 $2195 




BIG SAVINGS ON A FULL COMPLEMENT OF RADIO SHACK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



COMPUTERS 

Tandy 1000 1 Drive 128K 999 00 

Tgndy 1200 10 Meg. 256K 2195 00 

Tandy 2000 2 Drfve 256K 2100 00 

Model IV Portable 64K 970 00 

Model IV Desktop 64K 970.00 
PRINTERS 

Radio Snack DWP1Q5 160 00 

Radio Shack DMP-110 299 00 

Radio Shack DMP-430 660*00 

Radio Shack CGP-220 545,00 
Silver Reed EXP 550 Daisy Wheel 430,00 

StarSG-10 245.00 

Star Powertype Daisy Wheel 345 00 

Panasonic P-1091 295.00 

CITOH Prowriter 8S10AP 320 00 

CITOH7500 230^00 

Okidata ana Epson CALL 
MODEMS 

Radio Shack DCM-3 Modem 52,00 

Radio Shack DC Modem IB 89 00 

Radio Shack DC Modem II 160 00 

Radio Shack DC Modem 2212 315,00 

Hayes Smarimodem II 215.00 



COLOR COMPUTER MISC. 

Radio Shack Drive Controller 119.00 
Extended Basic Rom Kit 39 95 

64K Ram Upgrade Kit 49.00 

ftadio Shack Deluxe Keyboard Kit 35,95 
HJL Keyboard Upgrade Kit 79.95 

Botek Serial to Parallel Conv. 69 95 

ttadio Shack CCR-81 Recorder 52^00 
Radio Shock Joysticks (pair) 22,00 

Amdek Color 300 Monitor 265,00 

Amdek Video 300 Green Monitor 145.00 
Amdek Video 300 Amber Monitor 159 00 
Taxan Color 220 Monitor 245 00 

Taxan 1 15 Green Monilor 125.00 

Taxan 116 Amber Monitor 129.00 

Radio Shack VM-2 Green Monitor 139,00 
Co m p u te rwa re Video P I us I IC 34 95 
Mark Data Universaf Video Driver 29^95 
COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 
T , B rl TAPE DISK 

The Sailor Man 29.95 34 95 

Worlds Of Flight 29.95 32 95 

Mustang P^1 Flight Simul. 29.95 34.95 
Spectral Space Pack 49.95 53.95 

Spectral Adventure Pack 24.95 27.95 



Spectral Typing Tutor 19.95 22 95 

Major tstar 2 4,95 27^95 

Sam Slueth Private Eye 24.95 27 95 
Mark Data Graphic Advea 24^95 2795 
Graphicom (disk only) 29.95 

COCOMaxbyColorware 69,95 69 95 
Color ComE (rom) 49.95 49 95 

AutoTorm by PXE Computing39 + 95 49.95 
Key-264K by Key Color 39.95 4495 

Telewriter 64 49.95 59 95 

Deft Pascal Workbench 119*00 

Pro Color File Enhanced 2,0 59 05 



Elite Catc 
Elite Word 
Elite File (disk only) 
DynaCalc (disk only) 
VIP Writer (tape & disk) 
VIP Calc (tape & disk) 
VIP Tormina I (tape & disk) 
VIP Integrated Library (disk) 



69.95 69.95 
69.95 6995 
74,50 
99.95 
69.95 
69,95 
49.95 
149.95 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 COlfl 

• /flWKTPriCCmitDDIPCP 



Order any 2 software pieces listed 
ana take 10% off their listed price 
All Radio Shack software 10% off list. 
Send tor complete list, 



• LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

• BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

• TIMELY DELIVERY 
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 

VISA 



P.O. Box 1094 

480 King Street 

Littleton, MA 01460 ■ since 1973 

IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 



TCS-8D is □ registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Under 
The 




28 



113 



130 




FEATURES 



Multo Of Mars/Richard Ramella 18 

GAME Learn your multiplication 

Chopper Assault/ Jens Petersen 28 

GAME Prevent enemy agents from spying on you 

Analog-To-Digital And Back Again/ Jeremy Spitler 36 

SO UN D SYNTHESIS Program your voice into memory 

Simplifying The SOUND Command/ W////am R White - 42 

TUTORIAL Saving keystrokes and memory 

Animatic: Automatic Animation/fi/fa Saba 58 

GRAPHICS Ease the un wieldy task of writing animated graphics 

Send In The Clowns/Dary/ Judd 80 



GRAPHICS A simple program with a tune to match 

CoCo Chronograph/ Colin J. Stearman 

HARDWARE PROJECT Add a real-time clock to CoCo 



-H Piano Note Tutor/Ron Mix 



83 



MUSIC Learn the ivory keyboard 
Hi-Q/Daryi Judd 



92 



99 



GAM E Granny r s peg-game challenge 

Wireless Joysticks/J.O. Shaver 105 

HAR DWARE PROJECT Play games with no wires attached 

Super- Disk Charger/ Dennis Bironas . __ 113 

DISK UTILITY Puts the "turbo n in your drives 

More Patches For EDTASM/W.C. Clements, Jr 124 

DISK UTILITY Modifications for fixing the FCC bug 

Chopin's Minute Waltz/ Eugene Vasconi 130 

MUSIC Chopin makes the CoCo top 10 

Name That Song/Me/ Richardson _ 163 

MUSIC GAME Test your music and memory skills 



Cover art by Jerry McKiernan 
copyright© 1905 by Falsoft Inc. 



;-^ I The small cassette tape sym- 
bols beside features and 
regular columns indicate that the 
program listings with those articles 
are on this month's rainbow on 
tape, ready to CLQAD and RUN. For 
full details, check our RAINBOW ON 
TAPE ad on Page 248, 



NEXT MONTH' A red-letter issue! Join us in July for our Fourth Anniversary Jubilee*. We'll spark 
some fireworks with The Ultimate Program" — a tribute to some superlatives ot humankind 
by the talented Bob Tyson, Our birthday issue will also include Bob and Dan Delbourgo with 
graphics, Dennis We ide with a BASIC program for loading ML listings without an edltorVassembler, 
and Jorge Mir will present a helpful tutorial on using the ECB statement INSTR, Colin Stearman 
will put you "on the right track" by showing how to make use of ail 40 or 8G tracks on /our 
disk drive, and make CoCo use both sides of a double-sided drive, Pace yourself with a rapid 
reading program, learn the rules of soccer with Soccer Instructor > and for the fourth of July, 
well celebrate with a Musicfest program of traditional patriotic songs 

Along with other useful features, including a complete index to the past year of RAINBOW, 
there'll be our usual array of games, reviews and other anniversary surprises, Don 1 ! miss the 
RAINBOW for more information on the CoCo than is available anywhere else! 



COLUMNS 



@ BASIC Training/Joseph Kolar. 



Getting better acquainted with the DRAW statement 

Bits And Bytes Of BAS\C/Richard White 

Spreadsheet application for home economics 

Building June's Rainbow/J/Vr? Reed 

Managing Editor's comments 

[■g Byte Master/R Bartly Betts 



158 



238 



16 



138 



Some antidote for the assembly language blues 
Earth To Ed/ Ed Filers 



Beam up those "tech " questions 
(=] Education Noies/Steve Blyn. 



156 



A serendipitous learning experience 

Education Overview/M/c/?ae/ Plog, Ph.D. _____ 
News items on educational computing 

GameMaster's Apprentice/George Firedrake and 
Karl Albrecht ________ 



45 



55 



148 



Role playing games are effective learning tools 

PRINT#-2,/ Lawrence C, Talk 

Editor's notes 

~_ School Is In The Heart Of A Child/Bob Albrecht and 

Ramon Zamora 



12 



Wandering Star learns to PEEK 

Turn Of The Screw/ Tony DiStefano . 
How to follow a memory map 

__ Wishing Well/Free/ Scerbo _____ 

The world's easiest database 

RAINBOWTECH 



229 



144 



152 



Downloads/Da/7 Downard 

Answers to your technical questions 

KlSSable OS-9/Da/e L Puckett 

News, hints and answers 

MMLOQ/Timothy A. Harris. 



246 



252 



A database for keeping track of personal and 
business mailing lists 

Dan Easthqm's "Personable Pascal" will return next month. 

DEPARTMENTS 



249 



Advertiser Index . 
Back Issue Information 

CoCo Gallery 

Corrections 



Letters To Rainbow 

The Pipeline '._ 

Rainbow Info 



.272 

.267 

178 

226 

6 



Reviewing Reviews- 
Scoreboard _ 



Scoreboard Pointers 
Submitting Material 
To Rainbow _ 



Received And Certified 



.120 

129 

.188 



Subscription Information. 
These Fine Stores 



.190 
.180 
.182 

204 
207 
270 



PRODUCT REVIEWS. 
Product Review Contents 




June 1995 



185 



Managing Editor James E Reed 

Senior Editor Courtney Noe 

TechnicaMditor Dan Downard 

Submissions Editor Jutta Kapf hammer 

Copy Editor Tamara Dunn 

Reviews Editor Monica Dorth 

Editorial Assistants Jody Doyle, Wendy Falk, 

Debbie Hartley, Judi Hutchinson, 

Angela Kapfhammer, Belinda Kirby, 

Suzanne Benish Kurowsky, Shirley Morgan, 

Kevin Nickols 
Technical Assistant Ed Ellers 
Contributing Editors Bob Albrecht, 

R, Bartly Betts, Steve Blyn, 

R. Wayne Day, Tony DiStefano, 

Dan Eastham, Frank Hogg, 

Joseph Kolar, Micnaef Plog, Dale Puckett. 

Paul Searby, Fred Scerbo, Richard White 
Art Director Sally Gellhaus 
Assistant Art Director Jerry McKiernan 
Designers Heidi Maxedon, Eileen O'Malley, 

Kevin Qui^gins 
Advertising Coordinator Doris Taylor 
Advertising Representative Kate Tucci 
Advertising Assistant Debbie Baxter 

(502)228-4492 
General Manager Patricia H. Hirsch 
Asst General Manager for Finance Donna Shuck 
Bookkeeper Diane Moore 
Advertising Accounts Beverly Taylor 
Dealer Accounts Judy Quashnock 
Administrative Assistant to the Publisher 

Marianne Booth 
Manager of Public Relations 

Charles L, Springer 
RAINBOWfest Site Management Willo Falk 
Director of Fulfillment Services Bonnie Shepard 
Asst. Customer Service Manager Deidra Henry 
Gustomer Service Representative Sandy Apple 
Word Processor Manager Lynda Wilson 
RAINBOW ON tape Subscriptions Monica Wheat 
Research Assistants Laurie Falk, Debbie Leake, 

LprettaVarda 
Dispatch Janice Eastburn 
vSro|(|i^^ 



For RAINBOW Advertising 

and Marketing Office 
Information, see Page 272 



P0! 

Oti 



306, Prospect, KY/ 40059. Phone (502) 228-4492; THE 
RAINBOW and the rainbow logotypes are ^trademarks 

Second class postage paid Prospect, KY and 
additional offices. USPS N. 7Q5-050 (ISSN No '; 0746- 
4797). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the 
HAIMBOW, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY40G59. Forwarding 
Postage Guaranteed, Authorized as second class 

>stage paid from Hamilton, Ontario by Canada Post 

:tawa, Ontario, Canada 

Entire contents ;* by FALSOFT, inc., 1985. THE 
rainhow is intended for the private use and pleasure 
of its subscribers and p urcbasers and reproduction by 

for the single end use of purchasers and any other use 
is expressly prohibited. All programs herein are 
distributed in an ''as is" basis, without warranty of any 

TRS-80, Color basic, Extended Color basic, Scripsit 
and Program Pak are ® trademarks of the Tandy Corp. 
CompuServe is a ® trademark of CompuServe inc. 



the United States. Canadian rates are U1S. $38. „ w 

mail to other countries is U,S. $68, air mail U.S. $103. 
Alt subscriptions begin with next available issue. 

Limited back issues are available. Please see notice 
for issues which are in print and costs. Payment 
accepted by VISA, MasterCard, American Express, 
Cash, Check or Money Order in U.S. currency only. 



LETTERS TO THEItMIK 




f Return' Envelope 



Editor: 

First, a quick note to Dale Reed ("Letters 
To Rainbow," March 1985) . . . Instead of 
retyping a program like his No Ghosts (or 
if he just wants to run it before CSRVting 
it to check it out), just type POKE 65494,0 
in direct mode to return CoCo to normal 
speed. 

I am a beginning "CoCo-nut" and feel 
good that I can pass on some of my self- 
taught knowledge, rainbow has been a 
blessing in my quest for CoCo knowledge! 

Second, I am saving to buy a printer. I'd 
love to hear from anyone with comments 
on printers — advice on which ones to 
consider, which ones to avoid, best deals, 
etc. Also, does anyone have any old, 
unobtainable issues of rainbow they would 
like to share or sell? Please write to me at 
964 Rt. 518, 08558. 

Finally, I cannot resist commenting on 
Mr. Bungay's winning sexist "Envelope Of 
The Month" [March 1985, Page 9]. Since 
his envelope was a "winner" am I to assume 
rainbow's attitude as a whole is also sexist?! 
Please take note of my envelope in response 
to this. I do not claim to be an artist, 
however, I think my point is well made. I 
resisted the temptation to portray an angry- 
looking husband while his wife paid more 
attention to the rainbow than to him! 

Judy Leo 
Skillman, NJ 

Editor's Note: See the article by 
Ed Eilers in the May 1985 Printers 
Issue of THE RAINBOW, Page 178 
for a comparison on printers. Also 
the May 1984 issue has an article 
by Tom Nelson, "A Primer On 
Printers," Page 288. 




HINTS AND TIPS 

Editor: 

1 notice a disclaimer concerning the 
Dragon computer on the rainbow on TAPE 
order form. Mark Randall, in California, 
has a program that used to be sold by Tano 
that will convert about 95 percent of thh 
rainbow programs for Dragon use. You 
will find Mark listed from time to time in 
your BBS section under Color America in 
Covina, Calif. Since I have three CoCos and 
three Dragons, I find it very useful. 

Ray Chasse 
Studio City, CA 

DEFAULT DEFLECTION 

Editor: 

CoCo Max is by far the best graphics 
program on the market for the Color 
Computer, but I found that its exclusive use 
of the default extension / MAX limited the 
use of graphics pictures developed on other 
programs such as Graphicom, Micropainter, 
etc. 

By using the following pokes, you can 
change the default extension to /BIN. 
Before using the pokes, it is recommended 
that a backup be made. Add these pokes 
to the basic loader. 

POKE &H570B,&H42: 
POKE&H570C, &H49: 
POKE&H6900,&H49: 
POKE &HG901,&H4E: 
P0KE&H6989,&H42 

R.S. Gilmer 
Miami, FL 

TWO POKES TO COMPATIBILITY 

Editor: 

I thought some of your readers might be 
interested in a couple of pokes to make the 
older Telewriter-64 compatible with Disk 
1.1 BASIC. 

I recently had to replace my Disk 1.0 
ROM with Disk 1.1 ROM and found my 
version of Telewriter would no longer work. 
I disassembled the program and found 
where it called Disk 1.0 basic. I then found 
the proper address it should call with Disk 
1.1 basic. Here are two pokes which will 
modify Telewriter to call the correct routine 
for Disk 1,1 basic. 

P0KE&H22El,&HCfl: 
P0KE&H22E2,&H67 



These could be included in the basic 
loader program after it loads the TW64J 
BIN file or the binary file could be 
permanently modified by loading it, typing 
in the pokes directly and saving it. The start, 
end and execute addresses are &H1E28, 
&H40EB and &H1E28, respectively. 

R.D. Smith 
Eugene, OR 

THE T IS THE ANSWER 

Editor: 

I entered the MoCalc spreadsheet program 
from the April 1984 [Page 186] issue of 
rainbow, and found it a valuable addition 
to my software library. Mr. Whittom's 
addition to it in the April 1985 issue 
["Letters To Rainbow," Page 6] prompted 
me to write you with my enhancement. 

I have found it annoying, after not using 
a particular program for a period of time, 
to forget the commands needed to utilize 
the program. The result is to frantically 
search for the article in past issues. 

I have attempted to remedy this situation 
in MoCalc. By pressing '?', the function keys 
will be displayed on the screen for viewing. 
By pressing 'IT (update), the original 
spreadsheet is returned to the screen. 

255 IFL$=CHR$(63) THEN 1500 

1500 PRINT@99, "CELL ENTRY <G> 

x v 

1510. PRINT@131, "FUNCTION ENTRY 

<F>X,Y 
1520 PRINT@163, "FUNCTION VIEW 

<V> 
1530 PRINT@195, "MOVE ML, 

MR,MU,MD 
1540PRINT@259,"SRVE-LOfiD<S> 

<L> 
1550 PRINT@291, "PRINT <P> 
1560 PRINT@452, "PRESS <ENTER> 

TO CONTINUE"; :EXEC&HR171 
1570 GOTO 170 

I hope this addition will be of use to 
other MoCalc users. 

Michael S. Kovach 
Lakeview, NY 

FIRST CHARACTERS FIRST 

Editor: 

Here is a short program to correct the 
printer routine in 1.1 basic, which causes 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



the first character in a line to be missed 
occasionally. 

10 DflT.fi 52,4,214,111,43,3,53,4, 
57,249,255,34,84,37,250,53,4,57 

20 L-&H01DA 'STORED IN CASSETTE 

BUFFER 
30 FOR I=1T018:RERD fl-PDKE 

L,fl:L=L+l:NEXT 
40 POKE 360,1:PDKE 361,218 

This routine checks to see if the printer 
is ready before a character is sent. Just add 
this routine to the beginning of your 
programs that use printer output, and those 
first characters will be in front. 

Jerry Graham 
Clovis, NM 



BEATING THE SOCKS OFF 
PRINTER CONTROL CODES 

Editor: 

Please pass along a big thank you to 
Roland Portillo, March 1985 rainbow 
["Home Financial Statement," Page 87]. His 
article gave me something no other author 
has done: He included what his printer 
control codes were for and where in the 
program they could be found. This beats 
the socks off the rest of the programs I have 
tried to figure out; in fact* unless you have 
access to many printer manuals, it's 
impossible! 

Recently I acquired an Olivetti Jet Ink 
Printer — it's good so far, but if anyone 
else out there has one and is having as much 
fun as I did pulling the control codes out 
of its manual, I sympathize. It took me two 
days of solid digging and a royal flash of 
intuition to get them (I think). 

If anyone wants those control codes, 
please write me at 3123 - 138 Street SE, 
98012. 

Christine Terrio 
Bothell, WA 



INFORMATION PLEASE 

Editor: 

If I upgrade to 128K, will I be able to 
get more memory for games such as The 
Trip (August 1984 rainbow )? If I play it 
for more than an hour I end up with an 
OM Error and a ?MEM reveals 300 +- 100. 

Jay Thomas 
Great Falls, MT 

Editor's Note: We haven't seen any 
software for expanding basic with 
128K as of this time, but expect 
something to show up in the near 
future. As 128K modes are fairly 
recent, it will take a little time for 
software to evolve. 

MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TRANSFORMER? 

Editor: 

I have been receiving your magazine for 
about a year now and I, like so many others, 
think it is the best. 



I was wondering if there was a compiler 
for the CoCo that, instead of turning basic 
into machine language, would turn machine 
language into BASIC, either in BASIC code 
or in data. Is there such a thing? Anyone 
with an answer can reach me at 5473 
Cardinal Road, 54124. 

Paul Mac Arthur 
Gillett, WI 

Editor's Note: We know of no such 
program, other than a disas- 
sembler, which converts machine 
code to assembly language. 

Editor: 

I have just recently subscribed to your 
magazine. I love it! But there is one problem. 
I don't understand the double-check listing 
before each program. I was wondering if 
it might help me in correcting my programs. 
Thanks for the help. 

David Brown 
Joplin, MO 

Editor's Note: See "Rainbow Info" 
on Page 129 of this issue for an 
explanation of the Rainbow Check 
Plus. 

PMODE 4 SCREEN DUMP 

Editor: 

I have a 64K CoCo 2 and a DMP-110 
printer. I want to know if you know of a 
short graphics screen dump for the PMODE 
4. 

Brad Williams 
Springfield, IL 

Editor's Note: Radio Shack sells 
a screen dump program called 
BWDVMP (Cat. No. 26-3121). 

COMMUNITY CHOICE 

Editor: 

I am an avid rainbow fan. Recently, 
RAINBOW has carried a number of advertisers 
marketing video digitizers that convert TV 
camera signals to a Hi-Res CoCo screen. 
Considering the three versions carried in 
January: DS-69 by Micro Works, Graphi- 
com by Computize and VIDX by GRAFX, 
which of these have been endorsed by the 
CoCo community? Have you seen any in 
operation? Are they easy to connect to a 
standard video camera? 

James McDermott 
Tyler, TX 

Editor's Note: All of the digitizers 
you mentioned were on display at 
RAINBOWfest-Irvine and, as they 
are reviewed, we will try to dis- 
tinguish between them. The DS- 
69 by Micro Works is used by 
several other programs, but since 
these devices are of recent design 
well have to see which stands the 
test of time with the community. 

ROM PAK SWITCHER 

Editor: 

I have been an avid reader of the 
rainbow for several years now and eagerly 



await each month's issue. There is one 
problem 1 have that someone may be able 
to help with. 

Some of my programs are incompatible 
with Disk BASIC (especially Radio Shack's 
programs for kids). But with two young 
children that I want to have hands-on 
experience, removing and inserting the disk 
ROM Fak is a bit of a chore for them. It 
would seem to me that a switch could be 
wired into the ROM Pak that could enable/ 
disable the Disk basic ROM. Maybe one 
of my fellow readers can come up with a 
way to do this. 

David B. Lamon 
Yuba City; CA 

Editor's Note: Sounds like a job 
for Clay Howe. For starters, check 
his "Color BASIC ROM Switcher" 
article in the April 1985 rainbow, 
Page 98. 

Editor: 

I am a subscriber to rainbow and 
RAINBOW on TAPE. I have a 64K Color 
Computer with two disk drives. 

I am looking for a financial statement 
program that will list stocks and bonds, 
IRAs, mutual funds, savings account, check 
book balances, real estate holdings, cars, etc. 
1 am looking for something I could enter 
all of my assets and liabilities, keep them 
updated and print results on my DMP-200 
printer. 

Sam Cerami 
Fort Lee, NJ 

Editor's Note: We suggest you see 
our Business and Finance issues of 
rainbow, March 1984 and 1985. 

SEPARATING THE AMATEURS 
FROM THE PROFESSIONALS 

Editor: 

Your Simulation contest grand prize 
winner, Christopher Pfeifer, is indeed a 
winner! I read his article on the program 
Surface and was thoroughly impressed with 
the detail and clarity in which it was written. 
I feel he is no longer in a class of amateurs 
but now rivals the professionals. 

Is it possible to purchase the game Surface 
on tape? 

Vol Buncich 
Cloquet, MN 

Editor's Note: Surface is available 
on rainbow on tape. You cart use 
the order form on the insert card 
between pages 34 and 35 of this 
issue. 



16K ADVENTURE GENERATOR 

Editor: 

I was wondering if anyone knows where 
I can get an Adventure generator for a 16K 
standard basic computer. If anyone can 
help me, write to 560 Adamsville Road, 
16134. 

Adam Benedict 
Jamestown, PA 

June 1985 THE RAINBOW 7 



Editor: 

My wife and I have been reading your 
magazine for two years and we love it. Our 
only complaint is we don't have enough time 
to do everything in the rainbow. We 
recently started receiving rainbow on tape 
so we have more time to use each program. 

We would like to know if anyone has 
adapted the "CoCo Season's Greeting 
Cards" program, by Francis Kalinowski in 
the December 1984 issue to run on a Radio 
Shack DMP-200 printer. You can write to 
us at 1433 S. 78th Street, 53214. 

My wife just entered the talking math 
program from the February 1 985 issue ["Let 
CoCo Talk You Into A Better Education," 
Page 118]; we both enjoyed it a lot and 
would like to see more talking programs. 

Has RAINBOW a BBS or are you thinking 
of starting one? We think it would be a good 
idea to transfer media. 

Thanks very much for a great magazine- 
Pa/ 1 and Rob Brick 
West A Ms, WI 

Editor's Note: While we have no 
BBS, nor any immediate plans to 
create one, that prospect is under 
consideration. 



boy, Mrs. Norman still replaced the tape 

at no cost to me. 

Allan B. Klar 
Summer, WA 



COMMENTS, PLEASE 

Editor: 

I am a new subscriber to the rainbow, 
but rest assured that as long as T have my 
CoCo, I shall remain on your subscription 
list. RAINBOW is the best Color Computer 
magazine around. Keep up the good work! 

I would appreciate any comments from 
readers who got a firsthand look at the 
CoCo Max at the RAINBQWfest. Write me 
at 1706 Lakewood Road S., Edmonton, 
T6K 3H5. 

Azim Premji 
Alberta, Canada 



BOUQUETS 

Editor: 

I would like to publicly thank Custom 
Software Engineering Inc. for their patience 
and good service. They cleared my confusion 
about one of their ads and they gladly helped 
me get what I wanted. I hope all CoCo 
product companies follow their example. 
Thanks, guys! 

Jorge E. Monies 
Oklahoma City, OK 



NOW THAT'S SERVICE! 

Editor: 

I'd like to present one perfect rose to 
Michael Norman of KRT Software. 

I purchased a used copy of their F-16 
instrument flight simulator through a 
classified ad from a third party as a present 
for my son. The tape sent to me was 
physically damaged and wouldn't load. 

Although it was no fault of KRT, and 
in spite of giving birth to a 10 pound baby 

8 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



PRINTER PROBLEM 

Editor: 

I have owned and used a Gemini printer 
for some time and recently purchased a new 
one, called the 10X PC. Upon hooking the 
new printer up and using it, I discovered 
that Gemini had deleted the italics set from 
the printer's character set! 

To some, this may seem to be a petty 
complaint but, when you already have so 
many files set up with a word processing 
program (such as Telewriter-64 or VI P- 
Writer) that contain the italics, it is real 
disappointing to purchase a new printer only 
to find that it does not do what the old 
printer did! 

Otherwise, the Gemini-! OX PC is as 
capable and great as anyone could ask for. 

Mark Hardee 
Memphis, TN 

Editor's Note: The Gemini-lOX 
PC was a special version of the 
10X made for use with IBM PC. 
The regular 10X continues to have 
italics. 



CONTEST GROUPIE 

Editor: 

Being the novice CoCo user that I am, 
I would like to say that I am very excited 
again this year about rainbow's Adventure 
contest. The best part is that it gives novices 
and intermediates like me a chance not only 
to get a program published, but possibly 
to earn a prize. Keep the contest coming 
every year, please! 

Tim Lehmann 
Manhattan, KS 



KUDOS 

Editor: 

You guys do it to me every time or 
am I doing it to myself? I let my subscription 
lapse because I got tired of your writers 
forgetting that some of us are not interested 
in becoming Ph.D.s of programming. There 
are those of us who are very happy just 
working with basic. Not everyone is 
interested in moving on to machine language, 
pascal, OS-9, etc. 

What I am trying to say is some of us 
are just having fun at a lower level. This 
doesn't mean we don't have a good grasp 
of computer technology, so please don't 
forget us. 

Your magazine is really super, I promise 
not to let my subscription expire again. 

My system is used for tax record keeping 
for my job (airline pilot) and management 



of rental properties. Also, it is tied into my 
ham radio for RTTY,CW, etc. The article 
in February 1985, WEFAX [Page 42] was 
very interesting. I hope you are going to 
print the changes to it for Radio Shack 
printers. 

Again, thanks for a very good magazine 
for the CoCo. 

Alfred R. Genola 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Editor's Note: If you have access 
to CompuServe, GO PCS 126 to 
enter the Color SIG and check the 
various help files to see how to 
download for the Radio Shack 
printers. 



CLUBS, CLUBS, CLUBS 

Editor: 

If anyone is looking for a new CoCo club 
just for ages 5-16, here is the place to look. 
We won't have meetings, but will have a 
newsletter that will go out about every 
month. In it we'll have contests, programs 
and helpful hints on Adventures. You, the 
members, can submit these things. For more 
information please send a SASE to The 
CoCo Club, 1 1 Regal Drive, 07067. 

Derrick Kardos 
Colonia, NJ 

Editor: 

There is a new CoCo users group that 
meets at the Mercer County Main Branch 
Library on Rt. 1 in Lawrenceville. We meet 
on the first Wednesday of each month at 
7 p.m. We discuss anything and everything 
from CoCo programming to communica- 
tions with the CoCo, graphics to music, 
operating systems to hardware. We also try 
to arrange guest speakers each month. 

For more information call The CoCo 
Enterprise BBS System at (609) 448-7768 
or The Tardis BBS at (609) 448-1361 and 
leave messages with the Sysop. If you don't 
have a modem, call Rachel Sieverts at (609) 
443-4032. 

Michael Barcless 
East Windsor, NJ 

Editor: 

I am starting a CoCo users group and 
would like to reach some prospective 
members through your magazine. Interested 
CoCo nuts can reach me at Box 4Q7, RD 
1, 13021, or call (315) 253-4054. 

David Sullivan 
Auburn, NY 



Editor: 

I am pleased to announce our new Dragon 
computer users group, called Dragonet. We 
are a nonprofit organization in support of 
the orphan Dragon 32 and Dragon 64 
computers, with interests in OS-9, FLEX 
and other features of this fine personal 
computer. We have made numerous con- 
nections with Dragon user groups in Great 
Britain, and will be publishing a monthly 
newsletter to all subscribers. 



All interested CoCo or Dragon users 
should write: Dragonet, 101 1 Louisa Street 
70117. 

Wayne H Schnell 
New Orleans, LA 

Editor: 

I am attempting to start a CoCo users 
group in the Green River-Rock Springs 
area. Anyone owning a CoCo (or thinking 
about buying one), please contact me at 
(307) 875-2106 or write me at 2025 Iowa 
Circle, 82935. 

Stephen R. Slaton 
Green River, WY 

Editor: 

Thank you for your help. We are cor- 
responding worldwide with other CoCo 
clubs. Because of the rainbow, we have 
friends in the U.S., Australia, West Germany, 
Belgium and Great Britain! Our club grew 
up. Our new address is: First CoCo Club 
of Hamburg, 2000 Hamburg 65, Op de Solt 
53 a, West Germany. 

Theis Klauberg 
Hamburg, West Germany 



BULLETIN BOARD SERVICE 

Editor: 

Are you an active shortwave radio 
listener? Would you like to talk to other 
shortwave radio listeners by way of com- 
puter? Contact me via FIDO BBS, No. 77 
or via the UBIX BBS in Ohio or write to 
Colorado Shortwave Radio Listeners, P.O. 
Box 3434, 80161. 

Rob Harrington 
Littleton, CO 

Editor: 

I would like to inform your readers of 
the opening of a BBS in Orange County. 
The BBS will be online 24 hours a day, seven 
days a week. The board will be run by two- 
drive, 64K CoCo, with a 300 Baud Mark 
10. Those who are interested may call (714) 
847-5368 for the BBS, 847-2368 for voice. 

Eric Wilson 
Huntington Beach, CA 



NOUVEAU COULEUR BBS 

Editor: 

I would like to announce a new BBS (in 
French) called L80C, which is dedicated to 
TRS-80 CoCo. Features include message 
base, electronic shopping, downloading, 
uploading, games and graphics. Readers 
may call the BBS anytime at (418) 872-8347. 
Welly Denoncourt 
Ancienne-Lorette, Quebec 

Editor: 

I would like to inform you of a few 
changes concerning my BBS, formerly the 
Pony Express BBS, (816) 232-2320. It has 
been named the Dragon's Lair. The BBS 
number is now (816) 232-4932. It has been 
updated to a Colorama Version 2.6. I plan 
on modifying it to take on a similarity of 
a dungeon Adventure, It is currently 
running only in the evenings. 

Rick Drozd 
St. Joseph, MO 
Editor: 

Please announce our BBS in the Water- 
town area. The system supports up- and 
downloading, games, and many other 
features. The Durant Club Bulletin Board 
is online 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 
The phone number is (414) 699-3214. 

Durant Computer Club 
Water town, WI 

Editor: 

Fort Worth has a dedicated CoCo BBS 
Call TBBS Forth Worth, 300/1200 Baud, 
24 hours daily, (817) 232-2087. It will even 
handle full speed dumps from MIKEY- 
TERM's buffer! 

Wayne Day 
Fort Worth, TX 



the rainbow welcomes letters to the 
editors. Mail should be addressed to: Letters 
to Rainbow, The Falsoft Building, P.O. Box 
385, Prospect, KY 40059. Letters should 
include the writer's full name and address. 
Letters may be edited for purposes of clarity 
or space. 



ARTS AND LETTERS 



£'4$j<°; "'. iffi &&"* yi5.i :. 



... ■■■ .... 

llllllllll 








PARENTS! 

GET A KID 

HOOKED 

ON COMPUTERS 

Send for our unique LOGO STARTER 

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Teachers agree: LOGO is the best way to 
introduce children to computers. Now, with 
LOGO STARTER you won't have to read a 
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Your child will draw exciting designs right 
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LEAD A CHILD FROM 
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Our two QUIZ KIDS programs let you lead a 
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LOGO SHAPES use simple shapes such 
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Reviewed Rainbow May '85- Requires Color 
LOGO. 

£2es*14 95 ££s*14 95 

Both programs on one cassette $22.50 

SPEED READING 

Busy executives! Students! Increase reading 
speed dramatically. Best available speed 
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material appears on the TV screen at the speed 
you select, training you to read faster. You can 
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comprehension, plus a drill to improve visual 
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A naughty, sexy computer game for 2 to 6 

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"Would definitely liven up most parties." 

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DO SOME REAL 

ENGINEERING 

ON YOUR CoCo 

BOILER SIMULATION is a detailed tutorial 
on the dynamic simulation of industrial 
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STEAM TABLE gives steam properties in 
superheat, saturated and subcooled regions. 
Both programs available Sept. '85. Write for 
information and a 20% early-bird discount 
coupon. 

All programs on cassette tape for 16K Color 
Computer. Ext'd BASIC not required. Prices 
include postage {PA resid. add 6%). Send 
check to P.O. Box 210, Jenkintown, PA 19046. 

bGib software 



♦ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦***♦♦♦•*»++♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦+ 

June 1985 THE RAINBOW 9 



DISK DRIVES 
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Price Changes 
Occur On A 

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Introducing 

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Complete Systems Starting at $ 499*95 



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© 1985 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT, INC. 

I Edgell Road. Framingham. MA 1 701 (617) 872-9090 Tclcx-383425 



M. :■■-■ M . i r, thru ■ - r I * J U) .-.n i. -• i() ;>:■• [| S i I S i' tWKj IU1 Ut &30 pffl 



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s3A!«a >tsia siAiua xsia 



CRC Computers 
1 720 Charette 
Duvernay Lavale 
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TERMS: 

M,C Visa/ Am ex and personal 

cheeks accepted at nv esira charee. 

COD . please add 53.00. 

Shipping! Please Call (or amoum. 

Not responsible for typographical errors. 

Prices subject io change. 

TRSy 80 Registered Trademark Tandy Corp. Apple Registered Trademark Apple Computer Corp £ 

BM-PC Registered IBM Curp, Frank tin Regisrereci Trademark Franklsn Corp. Max/ SO Registered Trademark Lobo Ini |C 

Dosplus Micro Systems Software Newdos/80 - Apparat Inc. CO 

siaiuq Hsia S3AIUQ hsiq saAiua hsiq shaihci >isig siaiuq xsiq 



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All m siock products are shipped 

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Repair/ Warranty service is performed 
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FLOPPY DISK DHIVES. PXWKK SUPFI.IfcS AM) CABINKTK 

Our Di-tk Drives at*; U[. appmvol — Our Floppy Drive Cabinets and Power Supplies 
arc E 'iidcittJiiei.s I a bt) nidus I istoJ :mU have passed ilii^ rL-quireci i-ederal 
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Wsmntj iin all disk drhe* U nm< Jul 1 1 jptir part* and hibur. Warning tin flupp> disik 
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Duat Drives in One Ctibmti , '..'.'..'. 326.95 

Dud Sided 40 Ik Hart 162(H) 

En Case with Power Supply 206.95 

Dual Drive* in One Cabins - T . , . . 1*1 i 91 

Hair High Drive* 

Single Sided 40 tk Bare . H , 4 1 22.00 

In Case with Power Supply ,,,,.,.., 1 5ft. |j5 

Dual Driven in One Cabinet 306.95 

Du 3 | Sjdvd 413 Ik Bart! .^, rrttr . „ , , 142,00 

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Dual llrivc», in- One Cabinet . , . , . ♦,..,. . Mf>.95 

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35/40 Track in Case with Cable and Software 174.95 

Controller Card for Two Di&k Drives ,, ,,,... 49,95 

Combination Price for Disk Drive and Controller 19995 

Commodore Disk Drive* ,..,.,.,., „.,,.•.. , 239.95 

Power Supplies and Cabinet 5 14 " and Hard Drive Systems . . siarimg ai ASM 



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Color sysitem resfduiioo - 720h x 240^., MS- DOS . . $^295,00 

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Color system resolution - 720h K 240v, MS-DOS 2,445.00 

IQnicg^VTira - I Floppy Drive - Monochrome Monitor, MS-DOS 2,393.00 

XTLra - Color oystcm resolution - 720h x 240v h MS DOS 2,795.00 

ZOmea/XTlra - 1 Floppy Drive - Monochrome Monitor. MS-DOS . ........ 2695.00 

XTtra - Color system, MS DOS . , .♦.,,.. 3,095.00 

Internal Tape Backup For Any Of Above systems Add f 449.95 



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35 Track Single Head Drive with Case, Power Supply, Cibie 

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Model 1 Starter Sihleni — Dtli^trtd h> I. P.S 
One .Sjii^h< Kideil Disk Drive, Case, Cable, Power Supply 

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MOdej III IV Eflft to Install Disk Drive Sysicms. , 299,95 

Memory Upgrades — 41 lo and 4164 . starting at 1.50 ea. 



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Dot Mains 

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Panasonic 1090 24995 

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Silver Reed 440 E*0 Column 12 CPS Hi 95 

550 132 Column 19 CPS ...,,........, 439,95 

770 132 Column 36 CPS , 895.00 

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Apple/ Franklin Printer Interface w/Graphics and Cable 84.95 

Printer Cables , r starting at 1995 

Primer Paper — Microperf Bdae 1000 Shecls 16.95 



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Surge Protectors — Line Filters — SL Waber — 6 Outlets wiih Switch ...... $ 39.95 

Uninterruptable Power Supplies . . , 399.95 



MODfcMS 

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ADO IN HOARDS FOR THL I&M 
Mulli Function Board Clock 256K t Parallel Pen. Serial Port,, 

Special Software ,,,.,,,.., 

I- loppy Disk Controller , 

STR - Rio Plus I28K , , 

Craphix. plus . , P 

Graphics Plus II , , 

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Diskettes in 10 Pack , 
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Disk Drive Cables 

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© 
1985 
1 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT, INC 



Edgell Road, Framingham, MA 01701 (617) 872 9090 Telex-383425 

Hours: Mori, thru Fri. 9:30 am to 5:30 pm (E.S.T.) Sat. 10 am to 3;30 pm 

SERVICE POLICY — Our Professional Technical Staff Is Available To Assist You Monday Through Saturday. 

WARRANTIES — Up To One Full Year Parts And Labor. Floppy Disk Drive Power Supplies — Five (5) Years. 

SERVICE — 24 Hour lurn A Round On Ail In-Stock Parts. Dealer Inquiries Invited. Call 617-872-9090 

Please Call For Shipping, lOll X*TC€ l"ollO-343" l Oo41 ^**™*^ 1 ! r P^P fc « Kw -* 

„ ji. A j ¥ B Pnm 2nd Specifications May Orange 

Handling And Insurance* without Notice. 



PRINT #-2, 



The daffodils are poking their heads out of the ground here in 
Kentucky this week, which means spring has finally sprung in these 
parts and by the time you read this, they will probably all have 
given way to the tulips, roses and other early summer flowers. 

I like winter a lot because of the weather, but, like most everyone 
else, I love spring most of all The willow tree in the back yard is getting 
green, the pin oaks are starting to bud and it is time for my annual 
hunt for someone to cut the grass (for now, at least) on a weekly basis. 

Dr. Perry, who taught me more than a little bit of Greek and Roman 
mythology at the University of Alabama many years ago, would have 
some interesting observations on why human beings like spring so much. 
The rebirth of the world; the resurgence in spirit; the times when the 
gods frolicked atop Mount Olympus. Something like that — or all of 
those things. No doubt, 

I'm sure all of this has a lot to do with it. But, after all, even though 
the electronic pulses in our CoCos could outrace Mercury (and certainly 
are less tiring than the runner on the Plain of Marathon), mythology, 
rebirth and the like are far from the computer world of binary and 
hexadecimal digits, FDR^NEXT loops and so on. 

Or are they? You have read here before that I consider the computer 
in general — and the CoCo in particular — to be among the ultimate 
in many ways. And so, what would happen if we (as we really do do 
so often in our businesses and in our homes) applied our CoCos to some 
of the ultimate questions of the world and universe. What if we developed 
the "Ultimate Program:? 

AH of this is by way of saying that we're working on our big surprise 
for next month's anniversary issue. No, I will not say what it is. Those 
who know me best know how much I love surprises, But the code name 
for this one is "The Ultimate Program" and it involves a lot of ultimates 
— love and hate, war and peace — all of humankind's passions. And 
all on a grand scale. At least I hope so. Keep tuned. 

Our "Ultimate Program" is both serious and fun. When the surprise 
is over, 111 have some more to say about it — and will certainly welcome 
your comments, too. 



I have yielded to pressure. I often do. For years now, people have 
been asking me why we don't make up some binders to keep the rainbow 
in. 

I don't know. Because we did have some made up, and as soon as 
they came in, I grabbed six of them and started using them. Very nice. 
Very neat. And very organized (maybe that is why I never got any made 
before). 

Our hard-cover binders for THE RAINBOW are red with gold lettering 



12 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 

columns X 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User-friendly full-screen 

editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 

control codes 

Runs in 16k, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 

cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 

required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 
The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower ease characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fun. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 

Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk Or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single Control key command. 
The 51 x 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all oh the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time arid uOn*t even allow editing.. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-Width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the, Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting: Drives any printer 
(LPVI1/VIII, DMP-100/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable /disable justification. 
Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line hepders and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for sure saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 
Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



. , , truly a state of the art word processor. . 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 
704 Nob Street 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 
(weekdays, 8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries 
invited. 

(Add $2 for shipping. Californiarts add 6% state tax, 

Now available at 
Radio /hack stores 
via express order 

Apple II is a trademark nf Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a 
trademark of Atari, Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy 
Corp; MX-80 is a trademark of Epson America, Inc. 




MODEL 101 INTERFACE ^4^5" 49.50 

The Model 101 is a serial to parallel 
interface intended for use with a 
COCO and any Centronics compatible 
parallel input printer. The 101 has 6 
switch selectable baud rates (300- 
9600). It comes with a "UL" listed 
power supply that can be unplugged 
from the interface if your printer 
supplies power (Most do). The 101 is 
only 4" x 2" x 1" and comes with all 
cables and connectors for your 
computer and printer. 

MODEL 102 SWITCHER 35.95 

The Model 102 has 3 switch positions 
that allow you to switch your 
computer's serial output between 3 
different devices (modem, printers or 
another computer). The 102 has color 
coded lights that indicate the switch 
position. These lights also act as 
power indicators to let you know your 
computer is on. Supplied with the 102 
are color coded labels that can be 
applied to your accessories. The 102 
has a heavy guage anodized 
aluminum cabinet with non-slip rubber 
feet. 

MODEL 103 COMBO 35*9^ 73.50 

With the turn of a knob the model 103 
switches your computer's RS232C 
serial port to any one of 3 outputs — 
2 serial and 1 parallel. The serial ports 
may be used for modems, serial 
printers or even another computer. The 
parallel port can be used with any 
Centronics compatible printer The 103 
has the best features from the 101 
and 102: color coded position indicator 
lights, 6 switch selectable baud rates, 
heavy anodized aluminum cabinet, 
"UL" listed power supply and many 
more. 



The Model 101, 102 and 103 will work with any level COCO basic, any memory size 4K-64K 
and are covered by a 180 day warranty. 

The Model 101 and 103 work with any standard parallel input printer including Gemini, 
Epson, Radio Shack, Gorillia, C.ltoth, Okidata and many others. They support basic print 
commands, word processors and graphic commands. 

CASSETTE LABEL PROGRAM 6.95 

This fancy printing utility prints 5 lines of information on 

pinfeed cassette labels. "Cassette Label" is menu driven 

and is very easy to use. It uses the special features of your 

printer for standard, extended or condensed characters. 

Each line of text is automatically centered. Before the label 

is printed, it is shown on your CRT — enabling you to make changes if you like — then 

print 1, 2 or 100 labels. The program comes on tape and it is supplied with 24 labels to get 

you started. 16K ECB required. . 

OTHER ITEMS 

High quality 5-screw shell C-10 cassette tapes $7.50/dozen 
Hard plastic storage boxes for cassette tapes $2.50/dozen 
Pin feed cassette labels $3.00/100 





v/sr 



(MasterCard 



To order call our 24 hour order line 513-677-0796 and use your VISA or MASTERCARD 
or request C.O.D. 



Or send check or money order to: 
METRIC INDUSTRIES 
P.O. BOX 42396 
CINCINNATI, OH 45242 



NEW LOW PRICES 



Free shipping on orders over $40.00. ; Ohio 

residents add 5.5% sales tax. 

Orders under $40.00 please add $3.00 for 

shipping 

We manufacture these products. Dealer inquiries 
are invited. 



on both the front and spine. They are 
extra-thick and we're selling them in a 
set of two for $13.50 (plus $2.50 for 
shipping and handling). Because THE 
rainbow is so big, you need two 
binders to hold a whole year's worth 
of magazines. 

But they look real nice, keep things 
organized and stand up on a shelf or 
desk without any trouble. If you're 
interested in them, see the ad in this 
month's issue on Page 47. 

While on the subject of things we sell, 
we are really overwhelmed at the 
positive response to The Rainbow 
Guide To OS-9. Ken Kaplan, whose 
staff at Microware wrote OS-9, sent a 
most complimentary letter. And, inter- 
estingly, almost every other order we 
have received has been for the two-disk 
set of programs as well as the book. 
Tt is a resource you'll really want to 
have, especially in the years ahead. 



I received a letter just the other day 
from an officer of a Color Computer 
club out West who had just received 
a letter from another club suggesting 
swapping software. The letter writer 
said that he and other members of his 
club resented the letter and that he 
wished I would take some steps to 
prevent it as much as possible. 

We have been trying to do our part, 
but the bottom line is that you have 
to be the ones who stop software theft. 
It hurts every faction of the CoCo 
Community — including the users who 
end up having to spend more money 
than necessary to "cover" losses from 
piracy and the development of protec- 
tion schemes. 

I hope you will do your part to help 
us stop software theft. And, for the 
record, we do ask each club which is 
certified by us to agree to not allow 
"swapping" of software as a part of its 
bylaws. Incidentally, the bigger and 
better clubs are the ones which do not 
allow theft. Perhaps it is because they 
get into helping other members — and 
their communities — rather than having 
as a prime motive the ripping off of 
things for which they should be paying. 



— Lonnie Falk 



14 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 




YOU COULD FALL IN LOVE WITH 

AUTOTERM ! 

IT TURNS YOUR COLOR COMPUTER INTO THE 

WORLD'S 
SMARTEST 
TERMINAL 



K 



GOOD 
LOOKIN' 



AUTOTERM shows true upper/ 
lower case in screen widths of 32, 
40, 42, 51, or 64 characters with 
no split words. The width of 32 
has extra large letters. Scrolling is 
forward, backward, and fast. Block 
graphics pictures are displayed 
automatically and can be scrolled. 

The screen's top line shows 
operating mode, unused memory 
size, memory on/off, and caps- 
lock on/off. It also gives helpful 
prompts. 



SWEET 
TALKIN' 



KEY-BEEP can be on/off. Unac- 
ceptable keystrokes cause a lower 
pitched BOP! This ERROR- 
BEEBOP can be on/off. 

Talks to other computers with 
Full or Half Duplex; Baud Rate of 
110, 150, 300, 600, 1200; Parity as 
even, odd, mark, space, none; 7 
or 8 bit Word; any Stop Bits; all 
128 ASCII characters; true line 
Break; XON/XOFF protocol; and 
optional line-at-a-time transmis- 
sion. Able to send and receive 
text, block graphics, BASIC and 
ML programs. A 64K machine 
holds up to 46,600 characters 
(34,900 in HI-RES). 

DUAL PROCESSING lets you 
review & edit while more data is 



coming in. 



Fully supports D.C. Hayes and 
other intelligent modems. 

Talks to your printer with any 
page size, margins, line spacing, 
split word avoidance. Embed your 
printer's control sequences for 
boldface, underlining, etc. Narrow 
text can be automatically spread 
put. 

You'll also use Autoterm 

for simple word processing 

and record keeping 

You can display directories, 
delete files, transmit directly from 
disk, and work wjth files larger 
than memory. Easily maintain a 
disk copy of an entire session. 

Compatible with TELEWRITER 
(ASCII) & other word processors. 

~ SMOOTH ~~ 

WALKIN' 

AUTOTERM moves smoothly 
and quickly between word proces- 
sing and intelligent terminal 
action. Create text, correct your 
typing errors; then connect to the 
other computer, upload your text, 
download information, file it, and 
sign-off; then edit the received 
data, print it in an attractive 
format, and/or save it on file. 

Editing is super simple with the 
cursor. Find strings instantly, too! 
Any operating parameter, such as 
screen width, can be altered at 
any time. Uncompleted com- 
mands can be cancelled. 




PUTTY IN 
YOUR HANDS 

The word processor can be 
used to create, print, and/or save 
on file your personal KSMs. They 
let AUTOTERM act like you. For 
example, it can dial through your 
modem, sign-on, interact, perform 
file operations, & sign-off; an 
entire session without your help. 
KSMs can answer the phone, 
prompt the caller, take messages, 
save them, hang-up, and wait for 
the next call. The KSM potential 
is unbelievable! 

NO OTHER COMPUTER IN 
THE WORLD CAN MATCH 
YOUR COCO'S AUTOMATIC 
TERMINAL CAPABILITIES!!! 



WHAT THE 
REVIEWERS SAY 



"AUTOTERM is the Best of 
Class." 
Graham, RAINBOW, 6/83 

"The AUTOTERM buffer system 
is the most sophisticated — and 
one of the easiest to use. . ." 
Banta, HOT CoCo f 9/84 

"Almost a full featured word 
processor. . ." 
Eliers, RAINBOW, 11/84 



RECOMMEND 32K to 64K 

Tape-to-Disk Upgrade $23 

You Keep the Cassette 



CASSETTE $39.95 
DISKETTE $49.95 

Add $3 shipping and handling 

MC/VISA/C.O.D. 



PXE Computing 

11 Vicksburg Lane 

Richardson, Texas 75080 

214/699-7273 



Please hire the mentally retarded. They are sincere, hard working and 
appreciative. Thanks! Phyllis. 



WHITE HOUSE 
COMPUTER 

P.O. Box 4025 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

(717) 322-7700 

ASK ABOUT PHONE REBATES! 

HOURS: Monday thru Friday 
9:00 am till 6:00 pm 



PRINTERS 

STAR MICRONICS 

SG 10 225.00 

SG 15 389.00 

SD 10 3bb.00 

SD 10 465.00 

SR10 495.00 

SR 15 590.00 

Powedype 309.00 

LEGEND 

880 220.00 

1080 ...240.00 

1380 275.00 

1385 315.00 

C. ITOH 

851 OA 285.00 

8510BC2 389.00 

8510BP1 339.00 

8510SP 389.00 

8510SR 429.00 

8510SCP 459.00 

8G10SCR 489.00 

1550BCD 529.00 

1550P 485.00 

A10-20P 465.00 

F1O40P/S 875.00 

F10-55P/S 105900 

FIOTrador 169.00 

F10 Sheet 
Feeder . .-.■349.00, 



EPSON 

RX80 

RX80FT 

RX 100 

FX 80 

FX 100 

JX 80 

LQ 1500P. . . . 

LQ 1500S 

PANASONIC 

1090 

1091 

1092 

1093 

3151 



..219.00 
..269.00 
..379.00 
. 399.00 
. . 565.00 
.539.00 
1089 00 
. 1149.00 

. . 199.00 
..265.00 

. .399.00 
.599.00 
..475 00 



MANNSEMAN 
TALLY 

Spirit 80 

MT160L 

MT180L 



269.00 
549.00 
749.00 



OKI DATA 

1.82 

83 

84 

92 

93 : . . 

Image Writer. 
Okimate 10. . 



.229.00 
.545.00 
.645.00 
.349.95 

.565.00 
.425.00 
. 179.00 



PRINTER PAPER 

9 1 ."x1 1" 500 sheets white 

9\"x1 1" 500 sheets qreenbar 

9VY1 1" 1000 sheets white (Lazer 20#) . 

9V'xl 1" 200 sheets white 

9V ! x1 1" 150 sheets rag white 

9V'x1 1" 250 sheets ivory 

9V'xl 1" 3000 sheets white. 

14" x 1 1" 1000 sheets green bar 

1" Mailing labels (qty. 1 000) ........ 



. 1 1.95 
. 1 1.95 
. 19.95 

..8.99 
. 10.99 

. 10.99 
.42.75 
.24 75 

..9.75 



SAKATA MONITOR 

SG 100 Color 195.95 

SG 1000 Green.... 99. 95 
SA 1000 Amber. . 1 05 95 

ZENITH MONITOR 

ZVM 122 Amber .85.95 
ZVM 123 Green.... 75. 95 
ZVM 131 Color/Med res 

299.95 

ZVM 133 Color/Hi res 

RGB 399.95 

ZVM 135 Color/Hi res 

459.95 



PRINTER RIBBONS 
DUST COVERS 



ZVM 136 RGB/Hi res 



599.95 



NEC 

1201 Green/Hi res 

w/speaker 139.95 

1205 Amber/Hi res 

w-'speaker .... 139.95 

1260 Green 97.95 

AMDEK 

300 Green 135.95 

300 Amber 145.95 

300 Color 249.95 

TEKNIKA 

MJ-10 Composite/ 
Separate Video . 235.00 
MJ-22 RGB Composite 
Separate Video ..289.00 

MODEMS 

Volksmodem/ 

cable 58.95 

Volksmodem 

1200 249 95 

Hayes 300 199.00 

Hayes 1200 399.95 

CompuServe Starter 

Kit 24,95 



TEAC DISK DRIVE 

FD 55V320K/Half Height 
DS/DD 149.00 

FD 55F 320K/Half Height 
. . . . 96T.P.1 169.00 

Software for 
FD 55V 39,95 

DISKETTES 
SKC 

SS/SD .11.95 

SS.'DD 14.95 

DS/DD 16.95 

MAXELL 

MD-1 18.95 

MD-2 23.95 

ELEPHANT 

SS/SD 14.95 

SS/DD 16 95 

DS/DD 21.95 



INNOVATIVE 
CONCEPTS 

Flip-N-File (10) 

Fltp-N-Filc. ...(15) 
Flip-N-File w/lock 

(25} 

Flip-N-File (50) 

Flip-N-File w/lock 

(50) 

Flip-N-File ROM Ho 



INTERFACES 

SP-3 Serial to 
Parallel 



3.50 

8.50 

18.50 
17.50 

23.50 

Ider 

17.50 



.59.95 



• Dealers Inquiries Invited* 
POLICY:No deposit on COD orders. Free freight 
on all prepaid cash orders over S300.00 in the 
continental U.S. APO & FPO add S5.00 per 
hundred. For priority mail add $8. 00 per hundred. 
PA residents add 6°c sales tax. Defective 
products must have Prior RA number. Schools 
net 15. 

VISA and MC Accepted 4% 




BUILDING JUNES RAINBO 



Jerry Does Our Cover . . . 
Lonnie Sees the Light . . . 

And, Bob Accepts the Challenge . 



Our change of tempo this month begins with our cover. It's the 
creation of Jerry McKiernan, a Beatles and blues, steel-stringed 
Harmony guitar picker, who's also rainbow's chief illustrator. 
The work of our resident gnome should be quite familiar to rainbow 
readers, as much of the artwork on our pages each month reflects 
his elfish qualities. He's produced so much for our inside pages as 
well as several covers for rainbow's sister publication, pcm, that I found 
it difficult to believe he hasn't previously done a cover for us. Jerry and 
I both had to double-check to confirm that, yes, this is his first for RAINBOW. 
It's an auspicious beginning, so, even though widely-acclaimed Fred Crawford, 
our regular cover artist returns next month, expect to see Jerry dipping his 
talented hand into all sorts of things, from his "CoCo Cat" cartoon feature 
to designing new additions to our Rainbow Bookshelf series. 

While the rhythm is far-ranging in this our Sound and Music issue, with 
a little bit of everything from Chopin to sound synthesis, we're reserving some 
special fanfares for next month's Fourth Anniversary issue. After all, we're 
going to have the "Ultimate Program," 

Did Lonnie Falk have the light of the enlightened in his eyes when he 
handed me the Ultimate Program memo? It seemed so to me. Maybe it was 
the gleam of recognition. You see, he had "that look." No, there was no 
light bulb visible above his head when he summoned me into his inner sanctum, 
but he'd clearly had a vision, and you could almost make it out if you peered 
deeply into his pupils. After reading his three-page, single-spaced memo, I 
still regarded his "latest" with a large measure of disbelief. As usual, though, 
he was not to be dissuaded. 

While his immodest proposal for the Ultimate Program would seem to 
tax even the capabilities of that great computer room in the sky, Lonnie 
saw no reason whatsoever not to use the CoCo. His reasoning went along 
the lines that, given enough cassettes, everything that has ever happened could 
be saved to tape ■— or something like that. Just take it in byte-sized chunks, 
so to speak. He also saw no reason why we couldn't have it done in a month! 
That's when I called Bob Tyson. 

Much to my surprise, Bob Tyson accepted the Anniversary Special 
assignment in stride. He was so matter of fact about it, 1 decided he must 
have seen the same light that shone in Lonnie 's eyes. Write the Great American 
Program? Why not? Have it done in a month? No problem. Do it in under 
32K? Probably wouldn't take that much. An assignment like that would fluster 
Clint Eastwood, but apparently not Cool Hand Bob. So, stay with us; there's 
a new genre of computer program in the making and it'll be one of our 
fourth anniversary gifts to the CoCo Community. 

In the meantime, let's celebrate the sounds of CoCo and add to our musical 
skills as we explore this issue of THE RAINBOW. I'll conclude by breaking 
into my usual refrain: why not take note that a subscription to THE RAINBOW 
not only ensures that the beat goes on, but aiso saves you some 35 percent 
off the newsstand price. And, that's the name of that tune. 

— Jim Reed 



16 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 





A MUST FOR: 

High School Students 

The College Entrance Examinetinn 
Board CCEE3J has chosen Pascal for its 
college advanced placement computer 1 
science test. OEFT Pascal Work- 
bench provides all the Pascal program- 
ming cools you need to prepare for this 
test on your Color Computer, 



College Students 

Tht: DEFT Pascal Workbench gives 
you the software you need to do your 
Pascal programming homework at 
home on your Color Computer. 



Professionals 

Most of the pr-uyremming features 
found on the mainframes and minis used 
in business and science are available on 
the Color Computer with DEFT Pascal 
Workbench, 



Hobbyists 

Has the extensions necessary to quickly 
do any Color Computer programmrning 
job without giving up execution speed. 
DEFT Pascal Workbench helps you 
get the job done. Directly access as 
sembler language routines and hard- 
ware registers from Pascal. 



R.S. Cat.# 90-5002 
$89.95 






$39.95 
RS#90-5001 



DEFT 



$59.95 
RS#90-5000 






"pjgk-S^f 






HOT CoCo Magazine - (March 1985) 
^ "* DEFT ^ uct W , s the extent of 

mm TkT- ' T^ the C ° C0 USer wilh * very 
compatible implementation of standard h- asca | 
along w ,th many useful extension, for string ££ 

DilLn ? B mem ° rY """' and the c °™- 
P- at on of ^parate program module. Th at < 5 quite 

a lea, for a , yst em that can run on a 32K corner 

DEFT s Pascal supports real (that is, floating-point) 

variables Many CoCo aftermarket languages 

handle only integers; this Pascal give, you fl 

bore computation capability." 



RAINBOW Magazine - (November 1984) 
"The DEFT Systems people have put together a pack- 
age which is a complete Pascal and/or assembly pro- 
gramming environment that is reasonably priced and 
works like a champ." 

"DEFT Bench and DEFT Pascal remain an excellent 
example of what can be accomplished in the CoCo 
world. The entire package gives you all the necessary 
tools rn learn Pascal. If you already know Pascal, then 
it gives you a total development environment. No- 
thing is missing, there is nothing else to buy." 
"Any college applicant attempting tn obtain advanced 
credit will be required to know Pascal in order to 
complete the exam. DfcFT Bench and DEFT Pascal 
provide an excellent learning environment. The entire 
package is impressive. It is very well-written and 
exrrpmely easy to use. In all the years I have been 
looking at software packages, never have I seen so 
much offered for so little." 



DEFT Extra Only $39.95 

The perfect addition to your DEFT Pascal or DEFT 
Pascal Workbench. DEFT Extra is a library of gaming 
and direct file 1/0 routines with graphics routines that 
provide Extended Basic's graphics capabilities in all 8 
graphics modes. Full DEFT quality documentation and 
sample Paint program included, (requires 64K) 

Available 
By Express Order 

At Your Local 
Radio /hack Store! 

Also Available in Canadian Radio Shack Stores! 

All DEFT software and programs developed with DEFT software 
are BASIC ROM independent and use all of the memory in your 
Color Computer without OS-9. All you need is DEFT software and 
a Tandy Color Computer with Extended Disk BASIC, at least 32K of 
RAM and One Disk Drive. With DEFT Pascal ($59.95) you will also 
need a text editor to write your programs. PBJ WORQ-PAK compati- 
ble upgrades and Educational discounts available. Dealer inquiries 
welcome. 

Orders and Sales Information 1-800-992-DEFT 
Technical Assistance 1-301-253-1300 



3-D Graphics Sampler 
Only $29.95 

Do 3 Dimensional Imaging 
from Pascal. Define an object by 
specifying points and lines. 
Then, with 3-D graphics library 
procedure calls, Rotate, Zoom 
and Move your 3-D Skeletal Ob- 
ject(s). All Source Files 
Included 



P.O. Box 359 
Damascus, MD 20872 

Quantity of Each: _ DEFT Pascal _ DEFT Bench 
DEFT Extra _ DEFT Pascal Workbench _ 3-D Graphics 

Method of Payment (check one) D Check Enclosed 
D VISA □ Master Card □ COD 




Account Number [ 

Card Expiration Date 

Signature 

Name 



«*y sut. □□ ap DDnnn 

All orders are shipped UPS within 24 hours of receipt. Add 4% for shipping and handling; 
Maryland residents add 5% for State Sales Tax; add $2.00 for COD. 



GAME 

Laughing, dancing, lightning and stars 




18 THE RAINBOW June 1985 




, RAINBOW. 



Learn Your 

Multiplication 

With 



MULTO 



MARS 



U 



I 



don't have to learn the multiplication ta- 
bles," my 9-year-old announced. 

"Yes, you do," 1 said. 

"No, 1 don\r 

"DO!" 

"DONT!" 

My son and I often have such philosophical 
discussions. 

"Don't you want to know why?" he asked be- 
tween rounds five and six. 

"OK, tell my why." 

"Because when I grow up, they'll have wrist 
computers. If I want to know how much some- 
thing times something is, 111 just punch it into 
the computer." 

"That hasn't happened yet," I said. But in my 
heart I knew 1 was fibbing. There are already 
cheap digital watches with full calculator func- 
tions. Some of the newer ones are rumored to 
have spreadsheets that run up your arm. 

"Besides," my son went on, "when Vm grown 
111 probably be living on Mars." He paused, sa- 
voring the idea. "And my wrist computerll have 



By Richard Ramella 



(Richard Ramrl la has written two b&afcs and 
numerous articles on TRS-HO topics. He is a writer 
for a California hospital.) 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 19 



word processing so I won't have to 
write, And it'll have a full-color screen 
that picks up any TV program 1 want/ 1 

"But what if you run into a Martian 
slime bunny and it vaporizes your wrist 
computer?" I said, "Then you won*t be 
able to figure the coordinates to return 
to Mars Base One. You'll be lost out 
there! And all because you never 
learned the times tables!" 

"Oh, get serious, Dad!" 

I am a stern father. I sent my son 
to bed with only four peanut butter 
sandwiches and a quart of milk. 

That night 1 wrote Multo of Mars. 
Multo is a computer character that 
makes a game of multiplication drills. 

I remember learning the limes tables 
in a kind of group agony called choral 
recitation. Thirty of us squirming 
fourth-graders droned answers as 
meaningless as telephone numbers we'd 
never call. I'm sure most of us managed 
to lapse into fantasies while mouthing 
the numbers. Like my son, J usually 
took a rocket ship to Mars, arriving 
well before "two times two is four/ 1 

The next afternoon, I introduced 
Multo to the p re-adolescent Earlhling 
at my house, Multo helped but didn't 
do the entire job alone. Young Earth- 
lings must write, recite and think about 
concepts they are learning, not just 
punch the answers into a computer. 

Multo of Mars is a 16K Extended 
Color Basic program. It uses Extended 
graphics and animation to teach fun- 
damental multiplication skills ranging 




from " I * n to "9 * 9." The times table 
is an educational must which is presented 
at about third grade level and should 
be mastered by about fifth grade. 

Multo is a comic creature with 
tousled red hair, a huge head and big 
blue feet. Its mouth moves rapidly, then 
becomes a rectangle with a multiplica- 
tion problem. Mullo responds to 
correct answers in random, cheerful 
ways: dancing, smiling, crossing or 
blinking its eyes, and lifting an ear to 
emit colorful lightning bolts. 

Play is simple. When a problem is 
presented, the player types the number 
answer and presses ENTER. A correct 
answer produces positive visual cues> 
and that particular problem is erased 
from the system. It may seem the same 
problem is presented more than once, 
but consider that "4 * 8" and "8 * V 
are a different sequence, and that "3 
* 4" and "2 * 6" have the same answer. 

A wrong answer offers non~ 
judgmental correction, The mouth 
becomes a green rectangle, the correct 
answer is shown in white, and the 
problem is once again presented for the 
player to enter the answer just seen. 

This problem is not taken out of the 
system. It returns in its random turn 
until the player gets it right. In this way, 
the pool of problems narrows to those 
which the learner needs to study. 

Multo of Mars keeps score inwardly. 
About every seventh correct answer, a 
new letter of a building message appears 
on the screen. The encouraging message 
isnt completed until the 81st problem 



is answered correctly. When this 
happens, Multo springs its last surprise: 
a huge smile and an endless series of 
dancing, eye-crossing and blinking, and 
fireworks from the ear. The program 
must be broken into to stop the run. 

If your computer does not accept the 
"speed poke" (POKE 65455,0,), this 
command should be taken out of Line 
110. 

If a run of Multo of Mars is stopped 
before the entire series of problems is 
worked, the problems not yet solved 
may be seen by typing FDR X=l TO Bl: 
PRINT R$[X);: NEXT and pressing 
ENTER. 

My advice to adults is to merely tell 
the young player how to play and leave 
the rest as a series of surprises. The 
building message, especially, tends to 
sustain interest even after the player has 
seen through the facade of what is after 
all a math drill. 

The program has no sound. I removed 
the "hoops'* and "beeps" after a 
classroom test showed they tended to 
interfere with the work of students not 
at the computer. 

Finally, I am not a teacher, but I 
know these things: Telling the answers 
to a computer, no matter how much 
fun it can be, is no substitute for writing 
the answers on paper. There is a 
learning connection between seeing, 
saying and writing, and learning the 
times tables is only the first step to 
learning how to multiply large numbers 
by each other — a process that requires 
pencil, paper and mind, 

(Any i nq ui ries regarding this program 
may be directed to Ml Ramellaat 1493 
Mt, View Ave., Chico, CA 95926. 
Please include a SASE.) 




The listing: MULTD 



r 240 .,. 


. ...64 


800 , 


...212 


390 . . . 


,..,11 


950 .. . 


. .197 


530 . . . 


. ...36 


END .. 


...115 


680 . . . 


....17 









100 REM • MULTO DF MARS * TRS-80 
EXTENDED COLOR BASIC / 16K / RI 

CHARD RAMELLA 

110 POKE 65495,0c CLEAR 9001 DIM 
Z ( 1 , 21 ) : ZL*=- "U8E5F5D2L 10R 10D6" 

e GOTO 250 

120 2 $="6020010829697871" i RETUR 



20 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 




Pro-Color-Series 



TM 



THE LOGICAL CHOICES 



DYHACALC Telewriter-64 



42 Four Seasons Center #122 
Chesterfield, MO 63017 
Ph: 314/576-5020 



COGNITEC 
704 NOB ST. 
DEL MAR, CA 92014 
(619) 755-1258 



Pro-Color-Series 

DERRINGER SOFTWARE, INC. 
PO BOX 5300 

FLORENCE, SC 29502-2300 
(803) 665-5676 



SEE ADS FOR THESE PROGRAMS IN THIS ISSUE. REFER TO THE ADVERTISER'S INDEX. 



Derringer Software, Inc. 
Introduces The 



Pro-Color-Series 

Of Ready To Run Data Bases 



TM 



Get the features of the most 
flexible data management software 
package in a single application program 
for half the cost! 



$29.95 



Plus $3.00 
S/H 



Each database is completely set up and can be used as soon as you get it. The documentation that comes with 
PRO-COLOR-FILE is included so you can change report formats, label formats and math equations. You get all 
the file management features of the PRO-COLOR-FILE program such as summary reporting, field totals and 
averages, fast ML sorting, multiple indexing, custom tailored menus, file-wide recalculation of equations, auto 
key repeat and keyboard "click" just to name a few. 

After you use the single application program and see how flexible the PRO-COLOR-FILE program is, you'll want 
to get the Master Version so you can start creating your own database formats, In this case, you'll only have to 
pay the difference in price! 



MAILING m 



READY TO RUN FORMA TS INCLUDE 

Standard mailing list with a capacity of 1200 + names on a single disk. Sort 1200 names in 
less than 13 minutes! 



^^ 



MAILING #2 

MAILING #3 
MAILING #4 
INVENTORY #1 

INVENTORY #2 — 

FINANCE #1 — 

FINANCE #2 - 

Format disks can 



Standard mailing list with the addition of dues owed, date of last payment and note field for a 
membership roster. 

Standard mailing list with 8 category fields for specific mail out selections and a note field. 

Standard mailing list with added fields for a Church (or family oriented) application. 

A home inventory format that offers date of purchase, cost, current value, insurance # and 
more. Obtain reports by category and totals for present value. 

Retail inventory format offering stock level reports, Purchase Orders outstanding, cost, retail. 
profit and descriptions. 

Maintains a listing of expenses and generates summary reports by category or month. 
Reports can be merged with DYNACALC. 

A stock portfolio designed to help maintain stock holdings with detailed reports and current 
value updating. 

be purchased separately for $15.95 + $2.00 S&H — These are the formats only and don't in- 
clude the manual or the program modules. 

You can also use our other PRO-COLOR-SERIES programs, PRO-COLOR-FORMS and PRO- 
COLOR DIR, with any of the above formats. See their descriptions for features and prices! 

AH programs require a 32/64K Color Computer with at least one disk drive. Upgrading to the 
Master Version of PRO-COLOR-FILE can be obtained at any time for $30.00 + $2.00 S/H. 

Call or send a SASE for more details of each format and what it has to offer! 

Derringer Software, Inc. ♦ P.O. Bqx 5300 • Florence, S.C. 29502 • (803) 665-5676 



K*&* 



CO 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 



Pro-Color-Series 



TM 



© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 



Now there's a series of programs that offers 
Database, Word Processing, Spread Sheet, 



integration between the five major uses of a computer 
Communications and Graphics! 



PRO-COLOR FILE 'Enhanced* 2.0 $59.95 

An all new version of PRO-COLOR-FILE will once again leave its mark as 
the most flexible database in its price range for the Color Computer. 

• 60 Data Fields • 1020 BYTE RECORDS • TRUE MULTI DRIVE SUPPORT 

• 4000+ RECORD CAPACITY ♦ 4 USER DEFINED DATA ENTRY 
SCREENS • 28 MATH EQUATIONS « IF-THEN-ELSE FUNCTIONS IN 
EQUATIONS • FILE-WIDE RECALCULATION • 8 USER DEFINED REPORT 
FORMATS • 6 USER DEFINED LABEL FORMATS • TOTAL FIELDS ON 
REPORTS * SUMMARIZE FIELDS * SEND REPORTS TO PRINTER, 
SCREEN OR TEXT FILE • FAST ML SORT (750 RECORDS IN LESS THAN 
5 MINUTES) • CREATE UP TO 16 INDEXES FOR SORTING OR REPORTING 
RECORDS • AUTO KEY REPEAT • KEYBOARD CLICK • STORES FOR- 
MATS FOR REPEATED USE • CUSTOM SELECTION MENUS • 
PASSWORD PROTECTION • CREATES FILES COMPATIBLE WITH 
DYNACALC® • 

Because of PRO-COLOR-FILES ability to send reports to a text file, this 
means you can use your favorite communications program to transmit 
reports to other computers or read them in with your favorite word pro- 
cessor for creating customized reports. You can also convert ASCII files 
from your favorite spread sheet program into data files that can be ac- 
cessed for further reporting and analyzing. PRO-COLOR-FILE is also sup- 
ported by the PRO-COLOR-FILE National Users Group with quarterly 
newsletters. Join the rest of the world and discover for yourself what 
you've been missing. 



PRO-COLOR-DIR 



$21.95 



Need to organize all your diskettes so you know where each program is? 
PRO-COLOR-DIR will read your directories and create a master data file 
that can be accessed by PRO-COLOR-FILE for sorting and reporting^ 
1000+ records can be stored on one diskette with valuable information 
about each program. 

• DISK ID NAME • FILENAME/EXT • TYPE OF FILE • DATE CREATED • 
DATE UPDATED • NUMBER OF GRANS ALLOCATED • NUMBER OF SEC- 
TORS ALLOCATED AND USED • MACHINE LANGUAGE ADPRESSES • 

A diskettes directory can be re-stored in the data file with old entries 
deleted and new ones appended automatically. You can obtain hard 
copies of the information and create labels of the filenames for placing on 
the diskette itself, 



MASTER DESIGN 



$29.95 



This graphics program does more for you than just hi-res graphic editing. 
It will generate lettering in hi-res graphics that can be different sizes, 
skinny, bold, textured, drop shadowed, raise shadowed or tall. It will 
also interface with the Telewriter-64 word processor for printing hi-res 
displays with your letters. 

As a graphics editor, it takes full advantage of all the extended BASIC hi- 
res graphic commands. Create boxes, circles, lines, copy displays and 
utilize GET and PUT features. Some added commands include mirror 
reflection, turn displays backwards or upside down, Squish displays, 
create dot patterns for shading, or diagonal lines for creative 
backgrounds. 

Special text files created with the Letter Head Utility allow you to access 
hi-res graphics from Telewriter-64, your own BASIC programs or PRO- 
COLOR-FORMS. 

MASTER DESIGN comes with its own screen dump routine which inter- 
faces with all popular dot matrix printers that have dot addressable 
graphic ability. 
See reviews in: 
July '84 Rainbow t 0c\. '84 Hot CoCo Telewriter-e4 © 1983 by Cognitec 



PRO-COLOR-FORMS 2.0 



$29.95 



PRO-COLOR-FORMS will access data files you create with PRO-COLOR- 
FILE and merge them with a letter or place them on pre-printed forms 
such as statements. Any field of information from your data file cap be 
placed anywhere and repeated as many times in the letter or on the form. 
You can use the built in ML text editor for creating the form or use your 
favorite word processor. 

• DESIGN UP TO 6 FORMA TS AT ONE TIME • USER DEFINED PAGE SIZE 

• SUPPORTS SPECIAL PRINTER CONTROL CODES • RIGHT JUSTIFICA- 
TION • PASSWORD PROTECTION • MERGES WITH GRAPHICS FROM 
MASTER DESIGN • 

If you use our graphics program MASTER DESIGN, you can merge 
graphics with your forms for added enhancements. Have your graphic 
letter head printed at the top of each letter or incorporate designs, bar 
graphs or any display created within the form itself. 



Buy any 3 and deduct 10% - Buy all 4 and deduct 15% 



Shipping: Include $3.00 for UPS shipping, $6.00 postal, $12.00 overseas 

Send orders to: Derringer Software, Inc. P.O. Box 5300, Florence, SC 29502-2300 

VISA/MasterCard customers call: (803) 665-5676 10:00 am to 5:00 pm EDT v 



DYNAGALG 



■ THE BEST SPREAD SHEET PROGRAM ON THE MARKET* $99.95 (Includes DYNAGRAPH©) 

$89.95 IF PURCHASED WITH ANY OF THE ABOVE PROGRAMS. 



is a registered trademark of Computer Systems Center, DYNAGRAPH <:; j S copyrighted by Derringer Software, Inc., 1984. 
TELEWRITER-64 c j S copyrighted by Cognitec, 1983. 




(3 



.'■-^Mfycv 



MORE FROM DERRINGER SOFTWARE 



TELEGRAPHICS 4gt SIMON 



© 1985 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

PRINT HI-RES GRAPHICS WHILE USING TELEWRITER 64! 

Use your CoCo Max, Graphicom or any other graphics editing program to 
create your own letter heads or sales charts and then print them while you're 
using Telewriter-64, It's the perfect way to add that personal touch to your 
correspondence. 

Telegraphies comes with a hi-res screen print routine that interfaces with 
Radio Shack, Epson, Gemini, C-Itoh and Okidata printers having dot- 
addressable graphics. A simple modification to Telewriter-64 will allow you 
to exit Telewriter via the DISK I/O MENU and print out the graphic without 
affecting any of your text in the buffer. Using Telewriter's partial print op- 
tion you could have a sales chart or any other graphic printed right in the 
middle of your document. 

This is the same feature that is included in our MASTER DESIGN program. 
Since we felt you don't need to buy two graphics editing programs, we have 
made this feature available at a reduced price. 

SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFERS! 

TELEGRAPHICS - $19.95 

TELEWRITER-64 + TELEGRAPHICS - $64.95 (SAVE $15.00) 

COCO MAX + TELEGRAPHICS - $74.95 (SAVE $15.00) 

ALL 3 PROGRAMS - $129.90 (SAVE $19.95) 

(Available Only On Disk) (No Other Discounts Applicable) 

DYNAGRAPH 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

A utility program for owners of DYNACALC® 

DYNAGRAPH will transfer graphic files from DYNACALC to standard 
graphic files for further enhancing and labeling by graphic editing programs 
such as MASTER DESIGN. 

DYNACALC stores its graphic displays in a way that is not accessable by the 
standard LOADM command. DYNAGRAPH will convert these to files that 
can be LOADMed by most any graphics editing program such as MASTER 
DESIGN. DYNAGRAPH will also convert a standard hi-res display into 
the format that is needed by DYNACALC. DYNAGRAPH can also reduce 
a graph vertically and horizontally so that multiple displays can be combined 
into one. 

DYNAGRAPH - $19.95 

MASTER DESIGN - $29.95 

DYNAGRAPH + MASTER DESIGN - $44.95 

DYNACALC - $99.95 (DYNAGRAPH INCLUDED!) 

ALL 3 PROGRAMS -$119.95 



© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

Wouldn't it be nice if you could run through a BASIC program, answer 
prompt after prompt, and then have the same responses generated again with 
the touch of one key? You can with SIMON! 

SIMON will "watch" you run through any BASIC program and keep track 
of every keystroke you make. The keystrokes can be saved in a disk file so 
the next time you want to perform the same procedure, SIMON will do it for 
you. 

SIMON can remember 6000 keystrokes (including mistakes) and will faith- 
fully repeat them for you at anytime. A custom menu can be created so that 
the press of one key will have SIMON run your BASIC program(s) and select 
the appropriate command file to use. You can even have SIMON pause at 
any input so that you can enter information that won't be the same each 
time. 

SIMON is perfect for any type of reporting, file maintenance or any other 
program that requires a sequence of prompts Lo be answered each time it's 
used. This works especially well with our PRO-COLOR-SERIES programs. 

Requirements: 64K Color Computer with Disk. 

$24.95 (Disk Only) 



SIDE WISE™ 

© 1984 by Derringer Software, Inc. 

SIDE WISE makes your printer do something you never thought possible — 
priftt side ways! Print out an ASCII spread sheet file that has up to 255 
characters per row for easier viewing. No more hassles with trying to hold 
sheets together! 

SIDE WISE will read in any ASCII text file and print it out side ways using 
a Radio Shack, Epson, Okidata, C-Itoh or Gemini printer. The only re- 
quirement is that your printer has dot-graphics ability. SIDE WISE reads 
any ASCII file including BASIC programs and word processor files. 

Add a new "twist" to your printer's capabilities! 

$19,95 (Disk Only) 



Include $3.00 for UPS Shipping - $5.00 U.S. Mail - $9.00 Air Mail 
Checks, Money Order, VISA or MasterCard 

Derringer Software, Inc. 

P. O. Box 5300 — Florence, 'S. C. 29502-5300 

(803) 665-5676 



N 

130 Z*«" 234040482959": RETURN 

140 Z*- "022020606073737575070709 

0979": RETURN 

150 Z*-"02202060607373757535757B 

786969292906": RETURN 

160 Z*-" 000606765059" i RETURN 

1 70 Z*» " 700000040464647575777759 

59191908": RETURN 

1 80 Z *■ " 70202002020707292979797B 

7B757515": RETURN 

190 Z*-"00707009": RETURN 

200 Z*«"01 1010606071717373646414 

1 403030 1 1 405050808 1 9 1 969697B7B75 

7564"! RETURN 

210 Z*="741 41403030101 1010606071 

717B7B696919190B"s RETURN 

220 Z*=" 12721575"! RETURN 

230 Z*-"00790970": RETURN 

240 FDR H-i TO LEN(Z*) STEP 4s L 

INE (X+VAL (MID* (Z*,H, 1 ) ) , Y+VAL (MI 

D*(Z*,H+1,I)))-(X+VAL(MID*(Z*,H+ 

2,1)) ,Y+VAL(MID*(Z*,H+3,1))) ,PSE 

T: NEXT: RETURN 

250 PMODE 3,1 I PCLS1: SCREEN 1,1 

260 COLOR 3,1 i LINE (0,0) -(255,20 

) ,FSET,BF: COLOR 1,1 

270 M**"U16R5F7E7R5D16L5U1 1G7H7D 

11L5": DRAW"BM5,18t"+M*: PAINT(7 

,15), 4,1 

2S0 DRAWBM33, IB; U16R5D1 1R8U1 1R5 

D16L1B": PAINT (35, 15) ,4,1 

290 DRAW"BM55,1B;U16R5D11R13D5L1 

8"i PAINT(57,15),4,1 

300 DRAW " BM77 , 1 8 ; U 1 1 L7U5R 1 9D5L7D 

11L5"i PAINT(79,15) ,4,1 

310 DRAW"BM93,1B:U16R1BD16L18E1C 

3E4C1U6RBD6LB": PAINT (95, 15) ,4,1 

320 CIRCLE (125, 11) ,8 

330 DRAM " BM 1 37 , 1 B ; U 1 0R3L6R3U3E3R 

3F3" 

340 DRAW"BM153,1B;"+M*s PAINTU5 

5,15) ,4,1 

350 DRAW"BM1B3,IB(U16R1BD16L5U6L 

7D6L5 " l DRAW ■ BM 1 B9 , 5 : R5D4L5U4 " i 

PAINT(1B5,15) ,4,1 

360 DRAW"BM205,18jUl6R17D10L6F6L 

5H6L2D6L5 " : DRAW " BM2 11,5; R5D4L5U 

4": PAINT(207,15) ,4,1 

370 DRAW " BM227 , 1 8 ; U3R 1 3U3L 1 3U 1 OR 

18D4L13D3R15D9L18": PAINT (229, 17 

),4,1 

380 DIM A* (81): C-li D-Bli FOR A 

»1 TO 9s FOR B-l TO 9 

390 A*(C)=STR*(A)+"X"+STR*(B): C 

=C+li NEXT B,A 

400 COLOR 2,1s CIRCLE (128, 96) ,80 

f 1 « / f ■ 7D T ■ 55 

410 DRAW"BM50,80iH25R35ClR135C2R 



35625": COLOR 4,1 

420 R-75: FOR A—R+10 TO R-10 BT 

EP 2s B-R*R-A#A: Y-INT (SQR(G) ) 

430 LINE(A+12B,96-Y)-(A+12B-(RND 

(20) -10) ,96-Y+RND(25) J ,PSETi NEX 

T: COLOR 2,1 

440 FOR X-100 TO 196 STEP 56 I CI 

RCLE(X,70) ,20,,.6« CIRCLE(X,73> , 

5: NEXT 

450 DRAW ,, BM117,B5pF12E12"l DRAW" 

BM 1 1 5 , 1 78 s U27R30D27 " 

460 FOR X-100 TO 160 STEP 60: CI 

RCLE(X,lB3),20,,.5l PAINT (X, 185) 

,3,2i NEXT 

470 LINE(B0,188)-(180,192>,PRESE 

T , BF i DRAW " BM85 , 1 68 ; R32C 1 R30C2R3 

1" 

4B0 FOR U-l TO 5+RND(15): ER-l+R 

ND(3) 

490 Ql-Qi PI -Pi P-RND(26): Q-RND 

(0): CIRCLE (128, 125) ,P,ER,Qi CIR 

CLE (128, 125), PI, 1,Q1 

500 NEXT Ui CIRCLE (128, 125) ,P,1, 

Q 

510 COLOR 2,1: R1-0I C*«""t E-RN 

D(B1): IF D-0 THEN 730 

520 IF A*(E)= M " THEN 510 

530 F» V AL ( LEFT* ( A* ( E > , 2 ) ) s G-V AL 

(RIGHT*(A*(E),D) 

540 LINE(91,115)-(169,135),PSET, 

B: X»95: Y-120: A*«A*(E)+"-": GO 

SUB 750 

550 W*=INKEY*: IF W*=CHR*(13) TH 

EN 570 ELSE IF W*«"" OR INSTRC'l 

234567890 ",W*)=0 OR Rl«2 THEN 55 

ELSE A*=W*: C*=C*+W*b H1=VAL(C 
*>: 60SUB 750: Rl-Rl+1 

560 GOTO 550 

570 IF H1=F#G THEN FOR T-l TO 50 

01 NEXT Ti GOTO 590 

580 GOSUB 810: Rl-0: El-1: C*-"" 

g GOTO 530 

590 LINE(91,115)-(169,135),PRESE 

T,BF: KL=20+RND(30): CIRCLE(12B, 

115), KL, 2, .5,0, .5 

600 GH=RND(10): ON GH GOSUB 840, 

860,910,970: if GH>4 THEN FOR T- 

1 TO 600: NEXT T 

610 CIRCLE(12B,U5) ,KL,1,.5,0,.5 

620 IF D-74 THEN DRAW "BM 15,65; D5 

F5E5U5D5B5D6" 

630 IF D-67 THEN DRAWBM15, 103|R 

10D12L10U12" 

640 IF D-60 THEN DRAW"BM15, 1 IBjD 

12R10U12" 

650 IF D-53 THEN DRAWBM15, 151: " 

+ZL* 

660 IF D-46 THEN DRAWBM15, 166xU 

12R10D6L10R3F6" 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 25 



670 IF D-39 THEN DRAWEM25, 181 ; L 
10U6R3L5U6R10" 

680 IF D-32 THEN DRAWBM235, 101 1 
"+ZL* 

670 IF D-25 THEN DRAW "BM235, 123 | 
R10L10U12R10" 

700 IF D-19 THEN DRAWBM235, 139| 
U12D6R10U6D12" 

710 IF D-ll THEN DRAW "BM235, 154 t 
"+ZL* 

720 IF D-4 THEN DRAW "BM235, 169 | U 
12F6E6D12" 

730 IF D-0 THEN DRAW"BM235, 165j U 
12R10D6L10": BOTO 990 
740 IF El-1 THEN El-0: BDTD 480 
ELSE A*(E>«"": D-D-l: BOTO 480 
750 FOR P-l TO LEN<A*>: Q*-MID*( 
A*,P,1) 

760 K=ASC<Q*): IF K-61 OR K-BB 
R K>47 AND K<58 THEN 770 EL8E 80 


770 IF K-61 THEN BOSUB 220 ELSE 
IF K-BB THEN GOSUB 230 ELSE IF K 
-48 THEN BOSUB 120 ELSE IF K-49 
THEN BOSUB 130 ELSE IF K-50 THEN 
BOSUB 140 ELSE IF K-31 THEN BOS 
UB 150 ELSE IF K-52 THEN GOSUB 1 
60 ELSE IF K-53 THEN GOSUB 170 




LOWEST PRICES 




EDITTRON 

EDITTBON is a Machine-Language, Full-Screen 
BASIC Program Editor More powerful than any word 
processor for editing your BASIC programs EDITTRON 
allows you to HUN and debug your programs without 
having to SAVE them in ASCII. 20 simple commands 
plus Auto Numbering make EDITTRON an extremely 
powerful and Umesaving BASIC programming aid. 

Requires 16K Extended Color BASIC 

GOLDKEYS 

GOLDKEYS is a 64K Machine-Language Keyboard 
Enhancement which adds these powerful new features 
to your Color Computer: Function Keys, Type-Ahead 
Buffer, Non Destructive Cursor. Auto Repeating Keys, 
Key Click, Enhanced Line Editor, and these Powerful 
Commands: BREAKON, BREAKOFF, ONBREAKGOTO, 
ONRESETGOTO, INPUTUSING, and much more! 

Requires 64K Extended Color BASIC. 

Buy Either Program for J 20 QO on Cassette or & 22 00 on Disk 
Buy Both Programs for 5 35°° on Cassette or s 39°° on Disk 



Color BASIC BOM 1,2. , *30 DI 

Disk Extended Color BASIC ROM 1.1 s 30 01 

64KH28K RAM B u^o ms ... - - *3 51 



TERMS' Cashier's dice Its and Money Orders for immediate 
delivery • Personal chocks allow I weeks • Orders over SI 00 save 
|0»/fl • Calirorniaresidenisadd tV^u Sales T aa * Orders under S2 5 add 
S2 shipping • U.S. C.O.D. orders add $4 

441 a E. Chapman Ay*.* Suite 
Orange, CA 92669 
(7141 639-4070 




VIDTRON 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 




780 IF K-34 THEN GOSUB 100 ELSE 

IF K-53 THEN GOSUB 190 ELSE IF K 

-56 THEN GOSUB 200 ELSE IF K-57 

THEN GOSUB 210 

790 GOSUB 240: X-X+12: NEXT Pi R 

ETURN 

B00 NEXT P: RETURN 

B10 LINE (91, 115) -(169, 135) ,PSET, 

BF 

820 COLOR 1,1: X-9S: Y-120: A*=A 

*(E)+"-"+RIGHT*(STR*(F*G) ,2): GO 

SUB 750 

S30 FOR T-l TO 10001 NEXT Tl LIN 

E (91, 115) -(169, 135) .PRESET, BF: C 

OLOR 2,li RETURN 

640 FOR Ul-1 TO 5+RND(10): FOR X 

1-100 TO 156 STEP 56: PAINT (XI, 6 

6),RND(2)+2,2: NEXT XI, Ul 

650 PAINT (100, 66) ,1,2: PAINT(156 

,66), 1,2: RETURN 

660 FOR HG-1 TO 3-t-RND(5)t Cl-RND 

(2) : IF Cl-1 THEN Ll-79 ELSE Ll- 

139 

B70 BET(L1,170)-(L1+56,192),Z 

BB0 FOR J 1-170 TO 170- (RND(B) #2) 

STEP -2l GOSUB 9001 NEXT Jl 
690 FOR Jl-Jl TO 170 STEP 2s GOS 
UB 900: NEXT J1,HG: RETURN 
900 PUT(L1,J1)-(L1+56,J1+22),Z: 
RETURN 

910 GET (205,50)- (230, B0) ,Z 
920 FOR J 1-50 TO 30 STEP -li Q06 
UB 960: NEXT Jl 

930 FOR T-l TO 5+RNDU0): P-3+RN 
D(10): P*-RIGHT*(STR*(P) ,1): PL* 
- " E " +P*+ " F *» +P* : PL*=PL*+PL*+PL# : 

C0*=STR*(1+RND(3>) 
940 F*=" ^217,52;": DRAW "C"+CO 
*+F*+PL»: FOR Tl-1 TO 100: NEXT 
Tl: DRAW"C1"+F*+PL*: NEXT T 
950 FOR J 1-30 TO 50: GOSUB 960: 
NEXT Jl: COLOR 2,1 l RETURN 
960 PUT(205,J1)-(230,J1+30),Z: R 
ETURN 

970 FOR WR-1 TO RND(5)*2: IF WR/ 
2-INT(WR/2) THEN Tl-1: T2-2 ELSE 

Tl-2: T2-1 
980 CIRCLE(100,73) ,5,T2: CIRCLE ( 
113,70) ,5, Tl: CIRCLE (156, 73), 5, T 
2: CIRCLE (145,70) ,5,Tli FOR VT-1 

TO 10: NEXT YT,WR: RETURN 
990 FOR X-B5 TO 115: CIRCLE (126, 
X), 40, 4, .5,0, .5: NEXT X 
1000 FOR X-105 TO 113: CIRCLE (12 
8,X) ,32, 1,-4,0, .5: NEXT X 
1010 GH-RND(4): ON GH GOSUB B40, 
860,910,970: GOTO 1010 
1020 END 



The HJL-57 Keyboard 






Now available for all models, 
including CoCo 2. 



^^ 









Compare it with the rest. 
Then, buy the best. 



If you've been thinking about 
spending good money on a new 
keyboard for your Color Computer, 
why not get a good keyboard for 
your money? 

Designed from scratch, the 
HJL-57 Professional Keyboard 
(a built to unlock ALL the 
potential performance of your 
Color Computer. Now, you can 
do real word processing and sail 
through lengthy listings^wlth 
maximum speed; minimum errors. 

At $79.95, the HJL-57 la reason- 
ably priced, but you can find 
other CoCo keyboards for a few 
dollars less, So, before you buy, 
we suggest that you compare. 

Compare Design. 

The ergonom ieal ly-superior 
HJL-S7 has sculptured, low 
profile keycaps; and the three- 
color layout is Identical to 
the original CoCo keyboard. 

Compare Construction. 

TheHJL»57hasarigldlzed 
aluminum baseplate tor solid, 
no-flex mounting. Switch contacts 
are rated for 100 million cycles 
minimum, and covered by a epill- 
proof membrane. 



Compare Performance. 

Offering more than full-travel, 
bounce-proof keyswitches, the 
HJL-57 has RFI/EMI shielding that 
eliminates irritating noise on 
displays; and four user-definable 
function keys (one latchable), 
specially-positioned to avoid 
inadvertent actuation. 



Free Function Key Program 

Your HJL-57 kit Includes usage 
instructions and decimal codes 
produced by the function keys, 
plus a free sample program 
that defines the function 
keys as follows: F1 = Screen 
dump to printer. F2 = Repeat 
key (latching). F3 = Lowercase 
upper case flip (if you have 
lower case capability), F4 = 
Control key; subtracts 64 from 
the ASCII value of any key 
pressed. Runs on disc or tape; 
extended or standard Basic. 



Compare Installation. 

Carefully engineered for easy 
Installation, the HJL-57 requires 
no soldering, drilling or gluing. 
Simply plug It In and drop It 
right on the original CoCo 
mounting posts. Kit Includes a 



Ordering Information: Specify model {Original, F-version. or CoCo 2). Payment by C D check 

S^f M° r . ^^ ^ rd CU3tomera inc,uda com ^ e »d ^mber and expiration date. Add 
S500 for shipping ($3.50 for Canada). New York state residents add 7% sales lax 
Dealer Inquiries Invited, 



now bezel for a totally finished 
conversion. 

Compare Warranties. 

The H JL-57 Is built so well, It 
carries a full, one-year warranty. 
And, it Is sold with an exclusive 
15<lay money-back guarantee. 

Compare Value. 

You know that a bargain is a 
bargain only so long as It lasts. 
If you shop carefully, we think 
you will agree...The HJL-57 Is 
the last keyboard your CoCo will 
ever need. And that's real value. 

Order Today. 

Only $79,95, the HJL-57 is 
available for immediate shipment 
for either the original Color 
Computer (sold prior to October, 
1982) or the F-version and TDP-100 
(introduced in October, 1982), 
and the new 64 K CoCo. Now also 
available tor CoCo 2. 

call toii Free 
1-800-828-6968 

In New York 1-800-462*4891 




PRODUCTS 

Div. of Touchstone Technology Inc, 

955 Buffalo Road - P.O. Box 24954 

Rochester, New York 14624 

Telephone; (716)235-6358 



mm 







GAME 



ItiK 
ECB 



nswr 



Your undercover mission is to prevent enemy agents from spying on you . . . 




Chopper 
Assault 



By Jens Petersen 



AI6K FCB Color Computer 
game, Chopper Assault requires 
a joystick to play. The object is 
to stop enemy spies from gathering too 
much information; if they do, you die! 
First CLDRO and RUN the program, 
then you will be asked for either levels 
1, 2 or 3, depending on your level of 
play. Type in your name and press 
tNTER, which will then show the title 



(Jens Petersen is 14 years old and goes 
to Centennial Regional High School in 
Brassard [ Quebec, He likes to bike, 
swim, fish and compute on his Co Co.) 

28 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



screen. Press the firebutton to start the 
game. 

You will see from inside your own 
helicopter your four cannon sites > with 
a box in the center of the sites showing 
where the cannon will shoot. Your timer 
is at the top, indicated by a line or bar. 
Your score is there too, in the middle. 
You move the box, or center site, 
around the screen with the joystick. 

You have five shots at the enemy; 
when he gathers enough information to 
leave, another comes to take his place. 
If you shoot one, your score increments 
by the amount of time left. If your score 
is above the high score, the program 



displays some graphics to show you 
this, but it can only happen once in your 
game. 

You die if your time runs out, 
meaning thai the enemies have gathered 
enough information to destroy you. If 
you're dead, the program goes into text 
and you see your name and score, and 
the top three names and scores. Press 
the firebutton to play again or press 
*Q' to quit, {Chopper Assauit does not 
work on a disk-based system.) 

If you have any questions about this 
program, Jens may be reached at 6 ISO 
Baffin, Brassard, Quebec, Canada J4Z 
2H8, phone (5 14)678-4205. 




tware 



fflqt C0GI0 CaUtgrap^r. 



See You at 
Chicago RAINBOWfest 



Use your CoCo, your 8-bit dot addressable graphics 
printer and the CoCo Calligrapher to create beautiful 
signs, invitations, flyers, greeting cards, diplomas, cer- 
tificates, awards and love letters. 

The original Calligrapher letters are 36 points (1/2 inch) 
high and variably spaced. It includes an easy-to-use , 
menu-oriented program and these three typestyles: 



Old English Cartoon 

Gay Nineties 

Gey Nineties 

The CoCo Calligrapher requires 32K ECB. 
Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 



ADDITIONAL TYPESTYLES 

These tape$ of additional typestyles are available for 
$19.95 each. They can be easily moved to disk. The 
original Calligrapher program is required. 

Tape 1 - Reduced, Reversed, and Reduced-Reversed 
versions 



These disks of additional typestyles are 

available for $49.95 each. 
Disk 1 - all type styles on Tapes 1 , 2 and 3. 
Disk 2 - all type styles on Tapes 4, 5 and 6. 

Tape 4: Wild West/Checkers 



Old English 



Gay Nineties 



Cartoon 



Wild West C(. 



:i 



tethers 



umt<A-qai€jfisbaJbcd€ 



All typestyles on Tapes 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 include Stan- 
dard (1/2 inch), Reversed, Reduced, and Reduced- 
Reversed unless otherwise noted. 



Tape 5: Star 



Hebrew 



Tape 2: Broadway/Old Style 



■Stairs □I s ) ^7 

Victorian (Standard and Reverse only) 

eFicTorien 



Tape 3: Business/Antique 

Business dfetif f que 



Tape 6: Block/Computer 

Block 

CompuTEP) 



®Ije ©£-9 €aUtgrapi|er_ 

$39.95 

Requires OS-9 Version 01.01.00 and a dot matrix print- 
er. The OS-9 Calligrapher reads a standard input text 
file which contains text and formatting directives to pro- 
duce standard utput for printer or disk. You can specify 
which font to use; centering; left, right or full justification; 
line fill; narrow mode; margin; line width; page size; 
page break and indentation. 



These disks of additional typestyles are available for 
$49.95 each. They are not compatible with the CoCo 
Calligrapher typestyles or program. OS-9 typestyle 
disk must be used with the OS-9 Calligrapher. 

Disk 1 - OS-9 version of all type styles on Tapes 1 , 2 and 

3. 

Disk 2 - OS-9 version of all type styles on Tapes 4, 5 and 

6. 



1 



Dealer and author inquiries are al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kelly Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 11932 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (403) 
421-8003. > 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS only. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

2153 Leah Lane 

Revnoldsburg, Ohio 43068 

(614)861-0565 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Add #1.50 per tape for postage and 
handling. Ohioans add 5.5% sales tax. 
COD orders are welcome. CIS orders 
EMAIL to 70405, 1374. No refunds or 
exchanges. 



■^ 


VISA 


\ 




The listing: CHDPPER 



10 '******CHQPPER ASSAULT******* 

20 'JENS PETERSEN JANUARY 14/84* 

30 '***##*#******♦♦♦*♦********** 

40 POKE65495,0 

50 CLEAR300:DIMH(18> ,J<18) ,EX(10 

) 

60 A* (0) ="BDER2FD4GL2HU4" : A* < 1 ) = 

"BD6BR2RNRU6G" : A* (2) ="BDER2FDGL2 

GD2R4" : At (3) -"BDER2FDGNLFDGL2H n : 

A* (4) ="BR4ND6G3R4" s A* (5) -"BRNR4D 

3ER2FD2GL2H " : A* < 6 > - " BRNR3GD4FR2E 

UHL2 " : A* ( 7 ) = " R4G3D3 " 

70 A* ( 8 ) - " BRR2FDGFDGL2HUEHUE " : A* 

( 9 ) = " BD6R2EU4HL2GDFR2 " 

80 GOSUB7B0:SC*=0 

90 GOTO210 

100 T*=STR*(SC) 

110 CQLaR5,0:LINE(104,3)-(D,13> , 

PSET,BF 

120 D=106 

130 F0RT=2T0LEN(T*) 

140 E*=MID*(T*,T, 1) 

150 E«VAL(E*) 

1 60 DRAW " C0BM " +STR* ( D ) + " , 5 " +A* < E 

) 

170 D=D+7 

180 NEXT 

190 C0L0R5, 

200 RETURN 

2 1 PM0DE2 , 1 : COLOR0 , 5 : PCLS i SCREE 

Nl,l 

220 D*= " NR5D 1 0R5BU 1 0BR3D 1 0U5R5NU 

5D5BU 1 0BR3D 1 0R5U 1 0L5BR8ND 1 0R5DSL 

5BR8BU5ND 1 0R5D5L5BRBBU5NR5D5NR3D 

5R5BU 1 0BR3ND 1 0R5D5L5RF4D " : DRAW " B 

M92,30"+D* 

230 DR*= " ND 1 0R5D5NL5D5BR8BU 1 0L5D 

5R5D5L5BR 1 2BU 1 0L3D5R3D5L3BR8U 1 0R 

3D5NL3D5BR4NU 1 0R5U 1 0BR4D 1 0R3BR6U 

1 0NL2R2 " : DR AW " BM92 , 44 " +DR* 

240 DRAW " BM20 , 1 20D 1 0R5U5L5BRBD5R 

5NU5D5BR 1 2R5D 1 0G2L3H2BR 1 1 BU 1 0NR4 

D6NR3D6R4BU 1 2BR4ND 1 2F6ND6U6BR4NR 

4D6R4D6NL4BR 1 2BU 1 2ND 1 2R4D6NL4BU6 



BR4NR4D6NR3D6R4BU 1 2BR4R2NR2ND 1 2B 

R6NR4D6NR2D6R4BU 1 2BR4ND 1 2R4D6L4R 

1 F3D3BU 1 2BR4NR4D6R4D6NL4BU 1 2BR4N 

R4D6NR2D6R4BU 1 2BR4ND 1 2F6ND6U6 

250 DR AW " BM 1 60 , 1 50D2BR4BU2R4D 1 2L 

4U6NR4U6BR8D6R4NU4D6 " 

260 P=PEEK (65280): IFP=2540RP*126 

THEN270ELSE260 

270 PM0DE4,1: PCLS; SCREEN 1,1: COLO 

R5,0: F0RCF-1T02: Ql-127: Q2-96: Q3- 

96 : FORT= 1 27TO0STEP-3 : Q 1 =Q 1 +3 : Q2= 

Q2+2. 2: Q3M33-2. 2: LINE (T,Q3) - (Ql , 

Q2) ,PSET,B: NEXT: COLOR0,0: NEXT: CO 

L0R5 , 

280 PMODE0,1: SCREEN 1,1 

290 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 

300 DRAW " BM50 , 50R4NR4D2LG2FR4EH2 

"; PAINT (53,54) ,5,5 

310 6ET(50,50)-(5B,55) ,H,G:GET(1 

00, 100) - ( 108, 105) , J ,G: PCLS: FORX» 

1TO20: PSET (RND ( 10) +100, RND ( 10) +1 

50,5) : NEXT: GET ( 100, 150) - ( 1 10, 160 

),EX,G 

320 PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 

330 V1=RND ( 191 ) : V*RND (255) s 01-10 

: 02« 1 00 : EM=200 : AS= 1 27 : SD«96 : DS= 

96 

340 LlNE(0,0)-(255,16) ,PSET,BF 

350 COLOR0,1 

360 A=0:B=0 

370 F0RT=1T02 

3B0 A=A+1:B=B+1 

390 DRAW " BM " +STR* < A ) + " , " +STR* ( B ) 

+D* 

400 NEXT 

410 A»200:B=0:FORT=1TO2:A=A+1:B= 

B+l : DRAW"BM"+STR* (A) +" , "+STR* (B) 

+DR*:NEXT 

420 D=104:GOSUB100 

430 SCREEN 1,1 

440 X=RND(5)+2:Xl«RND(5)+2 

450 EM-EM-F3 

460 I FEM< 5THEN760ELSEL I NE ( 200 , 1 4 

>-<EM,14) , PRESET 

470 JH»JOYSTK(0):JV=JOY5TK(1) 

480 WE=JH*255/63 

490 EW=JV*191/63+16+5 

500 IFWE<5THENWE=5ELSEIFWE>250TH 

ENWE=250 

510 IFEW>191THENEW»191ELSEIFEW<1 

9+5THENEW=19+5 

520 L I NE ( AS-5 , SD-5 ) - < AS+5 , SD+5 ) , 

PRESET ,B 

530 LINE(0,SD)-(8,SD) ,PRESET:LIN 

E<255,DS)-(247,DS> , PRESET: LINE (0 

,EW)-(8,EW) ,PSET:SD=EW: LINE (255, 

EW ) - ( 247 , EW ) , PSET : DS-EW 

540 LINE(AS,17)-(AS,22) »PRESET:L 



30 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 






M 
M 
M 
M 

M 



M 
M 



M 
M 



M 

H 
M 



M 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H II I 1 M I M T T 1 1 I I IH I ! . 1 ? M I I II T T ? 1 1 1 I I i ff t f 

WHY ARE WE GIVING OUT TOP 
PROGRAMMING SECRETS — FOR A SONG? 

'cause you are #1 with us. We strive hard to give you the 

best to succeed. 

UTILITY ROUTINES FOR THE TANDY & TRS-80 
COLOR COMPUTER (VOL. I) 

This powerful book, written for BASIC and ML Programmers includes almost all the utility routines 
essential for programming. Each routine includes program explanation, memory requirements and an 
annotated listing. These routines if bought individually will cost you HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS At the 
price of this book, you can't go wrong. 

I^MihUS i°°Y? Po , sition Independent ML Utilities. NO ML PROGRAMMING KNOWLEDGE 
REQUIRED. Routines for: 

COMMAND KEYS: Access Basic/ECB Commands / Functions with two keystrokes" 
CURSOR STYLES: Create OVER 65000 different cursor styles. 
ERROR SKIP: Skip and handle errors for your programs. 

FULL LENGTH ERRORS: Get full length error messages instead of abbreviated ones. 
KEY CLICKER: Ensure key input accuracy. 

LINE AUTO INCREMENT: Use Computer Generated Line Numbers. 
PAUSE CONTROL: Put ANY Basic program (and most ML Programs) "on hold." 
REPEAT KEY: Repeat any key. 5 different repeat speeds. 
REVERSE VIDEO (GREEN and RED): Eliminate eye-strain. 

SPOOLER (16K, 32K, 6.4K): Don't wait for those long printouts. 32K Spooling Buffer in 64K 
SUPER SCROLLER (For 64K Only): Save everything that scrolls off your screen and view it 
later. 

TAPE INDEX SYSTEM: Get a listing of tape programs. 
TAPE-TO-DISK: Move Basic and ML programs from tape to disk. 
TEXT SCREEN SCROLL PROTECT: Disable text screen scroll. 

AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!!! 
COMPATIBLE WITH 16K/32K/64K ECB/Disk Basic Cassette and Disk Systems 

CoCo I and CoCo II. 

ONLY $19.95 

These Routines (Ready-To- Run) On Cassette/Disk Only $24.95 
Both Book & Cassette/Disk $36.95 



500 POKES, PEEKS \N EXECS for the 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 

NEVER BEFORE has this information of vital significance to a programmer been so 
readily available to everyone. This book will help you 'GET UNDERNEATH THE COVER' 
of the Color Computer and develop your own HI-QUALITY programs, SO WHY WAIT? 
This 80-page book includes POKEs, PEEKs and EXECs to: 

* Autostart your Basic programs. 

* Disable most Color Basic/ECB/Disk Basic Commands. 

* Disable BREAK KEY, CLEAR KEY and RESET BUTTON. 

* Generate a Repeat^Key, 

* Merge two Basic programs. 

* Transfer Rompaks to tape (for 64K only). 

* Speed up your programs. 

: ISSSi JKB££SK£8?i&ET button. mmm ¥oiW£Z e Ar 32Km * 

* Produce Key : Clicks and Error-Beeps. basic cassette and disk systems 
Recover Basic programs lost by NEW, ?10 ERRORS and faulty RESET. and CoCo I and CoCo II 

* Set 23 different GRAPHIC/SEMIGRAPHIC modes. ajaap 

* Set 15 of the most commonly used Baud Rates. only h> I U.93 

* Allow you more plays in 23 of your favorite arcade games. «,«■■• 
a«*4 ™.,«u *.. A i — ^-~ * Basic Programming (fj-i yj QJ" 

Tricks Revealed ^J) | 4as/0 




f And much, much more. 



MJF 



See us at 
RAINBOW FEST-Chicago 






MlCROCOM 
SOFTWARE 

P.O. BOX 214, FAIRPORT, N.Y. 14450 

T ° °*l e ^y^^^ C ' CHECK, MO, COD ($2.50 extra). Please add $2.00 shipping and handling (For- 
e, ?n S„ - 00 /- U J? Residen *s. Please add Sales Tax. • Immediate shipment • Order by phone and Qet 
S2.00 refund for your phone call • Call for discounts on bulk quantities • Dealer inquiries invited 



'^iilllll 24-HOUR ORDER HOT LiKE:(716) 223-1477 til l I I T U T 



INE (AS, 191) -(AS, 185) , PRESET! LINE 

(WE, 17)- (WE, 22) ,PSET:LINE(WE,191 

>-<WE,lB5> ,PSET:AS-WE 

550 LINE(WE-5,EW-S)~(WE+5,EW+5) , 

PSET,E 

560 P=PEEK (65280) s IFP=1260RP=254 

GOSUB640 

570 RN=RND(20) : IFRN=1THENX1=-Xls 

PLAY"L255V3101;CD" ELSE IF RN«=2T 

HENX=-X : PLAY"L255V31D1 ; CD" 

580 IFX4=>5THENF0RT«1T07STEP2: CI 

RCLE(V+4,Vl+3) ,T:NEXT:FDRT=1T07S 

TEP2:CIRCLE(V+4,Vl+3) ,T,0:NEXT:V 

=RND (255) : V1=RND ( 191 ) s PLAY"L50O5 

DGDGDGDGD": X4=0 

590 V=V+Xs IFV>247THENV=7ELSEIFV< 

7THENV=247 

600 V 1 =V 1 +X 1 ! I FV 1 > 1 05THENV 1 =24EL 

SE I FV 1< 24THENV 1 = 185 

610 PUT(01,02)-(01+8,02+5) ,J,PSE 

T:PUT(V,Vl)~(V+8,Vl+5) ,H,PSET:01 

=V:02=V1 

620 IFINKEY$="Q"THEN910 

630 GOTO450 

640 PRESET (WE, EW) i PUT <V,V1 > - <V+B 

,Vl+5) ,H,PSET:PH=PPOINT(WE,EW) :L 

INE(WE,22)-(WE,185) ,PSETs LINE ( 10 

,EW)~<245,EW) ,PSET:LINE(WE,22)-( 



WE, 185) , PRESET: LINE <10,EW)- (245. 

EW ) , PRESET s PLAY " L255V3 1 1 ; 1 2 j 1 1 ; 

1059s8" 

650 I FPH< >0THEN660ELSEEM=EM~5 ! X4 

=X4+1: RETURN 

660 PUT ( WE-5 , EW~5 ) - ( WE+5 , EW+5 > , E 

A ^ r Dt. I 

670 DRAW"C0BM72,3D4ND4R4NU4D4BR3 

NUSBR4U8NL2R2BR3D5BD2D " 

680 PLAY"L30V31O1 ; 12: 1 ; 12: 1 ; 12; 1 

;12;1;L255D1;4:3;2;1;4:3;2;1;4;3 

5 2; 1;4;3;2; 1 : 4; 3; 2s 1 5 4« 3; 2; 1 : 4; 3 

: 2; 1 ; 4; 3; 2? 1 " : PUT (WE-5,EW-5> - (WE 

+5, EW+5) ,J,PSET 

690 SC=SC+EM : GOSUB 1 00 : EM=200 

700 LINE(200,14)-(0,14) ,PSET 

710 V=RND(255):V1=RND(191):IFSGN 

( X ) =- 1 THENX=RND ( 5 ) +2ELSEX= ( RND ( 5 

)+2)*~l 

720 IFSGN(X1)=-1THENX1=RND(5)+2E 

LSEXl=(RND(5)+2)*-l 

730 IFSOSC(l) THENIFGPO1THENC0 

LOR5,0:FORCF=1TO2:Q1=127:Q2=104: 

Q3=104sFORT=127TO0STEP-3:Ql=Ql+3 

; Q2=Q2+2: Q3=Q3-2: LINE (T,Q3) - <Q1 , 

G2> ,PSET,B:NEXTT:COLOR0,0:NEXT:C 

OLOR5,0:GP=1 

740 DRAW " C5BM72 , 3D4ND4R4NU4D4BR3 



s*Z, 



r 






•1 



Patents! Want to stimulate pur child's learning? 



TCE'S EARLY LEARNING SERIES 



3 



,X 



ABC*S In Color 

Speed your child's learning of the 
Alphabet! 

CoCo MK ECB Tape $ IB. 95 Disk $25,95 



■Mr. Bear Count 

A counting program that will tantalize 
the youngest member of your family! 

CoCol^K Tape $15.95 Disk $19.95 



Alpha Memory 

Your child can master the lower and 
upper case letters of the alphabet while 
having fun! 

CoCo lGK Tape $16.95 Disk $20.95 



Mr. Beat Math 
Add fit subtract with Mr. Bear. Your 
child will gain Mr. Bear's wink of praise 
& approval! 
C0C0I6K Tape $15.95 Disk $19,95 



Basic Math 

Lea rn to add & subtract through 
counting! 

G0G0 16K ECB Tape $12.95 Disk $16,95 

Mix h Match 
A brilliantly colored constantly moving 
computer version of concentration! 

CoCo 16K Tape $12,95 Disk $16.95 




Mr, Bear Flash Card 
After your child has mastered Mr. Bear 
Math, continue his/her learning, 
experience with Mr, Bear's 
multipheatioii & division flash card. 
CoCo H3K Tape $15.95 Disk $19.95 

Program will aid your child in learning 
the value of money! 

CoCo 32K ECB Tape $19.95 Disk $24.95 




Let your computer aid your child in 

learning to spell! 

CoCo 16K ECB Tape $ 14,95 Disk $18.95 

.V Jeachmg Clock 
Learn to tell time with the aid of a special 
teaching clock! 

CoCo 10K ECB Tape $16,95 Bisk mm 



^f§Ii§I 



. . t-WI '* ■ ■' 

..;■. ...-.-.. •. 
■:';■.■ :•..■■ ••.-.;-.-^.-. -. •..•■::■.■;:'..■■.;■:' ■.. . 

■ ;.-. . .- . ;■■;■■; .'.■.'.■'■.'■' ..'•.';',■': 




32 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



NUBBR4U8NL2R2BR3D5BD2D " 
750 GOTO450 

760 PLAY "L20V3 101 ; 6; 5s 4? 3; 2: 1 s L3 
0; 6; 5; 4; 3; 2; 1 5 L50s6; 5; 4; 3; 2s 1 s L7 
0; 6; 5; 4; 3; 2; 1 5 L90s 6; 5; 4s 3; 2s 1 ; LI 
30; 6; 5; 4; 3; 2; 1 ; L200; 6; 5s 4s 3s 2s 1 " 
s FORT=lTO50s LINE (RND (255) ,RND (19 
1) )-<AS,SD) ,PSET:NEXT 

770 GOTO910 

7B0 CLS 

790 PR I NT© 11," CHOPPER " s PR I NTS32+ 
1 1 , "ASSAULT" s PRINT@32*2+7, "BY JE 

NS PETERSEN" 

800 PRINT@32*3,"PRESS LEVEL OF D 
IFFICULTY" 

810 PRINT@32#4,"1- BEGINNER" i PRI 

NT@32*5,"2- EXPERT" : PRINT@32*6, " 

3- PRO" 

820 PLAY " L255V3 1 1 " 5 FORT= 1 024TO 1 

535:Z=PEEK(T) : IF Z>63THENP0KET, Z- 

64s PLAY" 1" 

830 NEXT 

840 A*«INKEY*s IFA*=" "THEN840ELSE 

I F VAL < A* )< 1 ORVAL < A* ) >3THEN840 

850 PLAY"L255V3101; 1 ; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6s 7 

;B;9; 10; U; 12" 

B60 PRINTS256,"name"s 

870 POKE282,0 



880 

B90 

900 

RN 

910 

920 

930 

PER 

940 



INPUTNA*: IFNA#=""THEN860 

P0KE2B2 , 1 

U7= VAL < A* ) +2 s F3= VAL ( A* ) s RETU 



CLS 

PR I NTQ64+ 11," GAME OVER " 

PR I NT@0 , " " ; s PR I NTT AB ( B ) " CHOP 

ASSAULT" 

IFSOSC ( 1 ) THENSC (3) =SC <2) : NA 
* (3) =NA* (2) s SC (2) =SC < 1 ) s NA* (2) =N 
A* ( 1 ) : SC ( 1 ) «SCs NA* < 1 ) =NA* 
950 IFSC<SC<1)ANDSC>SC(2)THENSC( 
3) =SC (2) s NA* (3) =NA* (2) s SC (2) =SC: 
NA*(2)=NA* 

960 1 FSC< SC ( 2 ) ANDSC >SC ( 3 ) THENSC ( 
3)=SCsNA*(3)=NA* 
970 PRINTei28+ll,SCsNA*5 
9B0 PR INT@1 92+10, "HIGH SCORES" 
990 PRINT@256+10,SC(l)sNA*(l)s 
1000 PRINT@288-H0,SC(2)sNA*(2)5 
1010 PRINT@320+10,5C<3> ;NA*(3) ; 
1020 FORT=1024TO1535:Z=PEEK(T) : I 
FZ >63THENP0KET , Z-64 
1030 PLAY"L255V3104sD":NEXT 
1 040 P=PEEK ( 65280 ) : I FP= 1 260RP=25 
4THENB0ELSE I F I NKE Y*= " Q " THEN 1 050E 
LSE1040 
1050 CLS: CLEAR: POKE65494,0 



PAYROL/BAS™ PAYROLL PROGRAM 

From Howard Medical By Bemie Litton 

Increase the power of your Color Computer with useful business programs from Howard Medical 



A dynamic tool for businesses and accountants, PAYROL/BAS™ cuts checks and 
keeps records for companies up to 100 employees. All you need is a computer 
with 64K Extended Basic, one disk drive and a printer, and PAYROL/BAS™ lets 
you: 

• Enter employee data {name, address, SS#, FICA, taxes, deductions, profit 
sharing, insurance). 

• Cut checks. (The program works with both pin-feed and friction-feed printers, 
and we can even supply the checks if you need them.) 

• Automatically calculates and stores seven deductions, including federal, FICA, 
state, three of your choosing (such as city, profit sharing or insurance) and one 
miscellaneous. 

• Will calculate tax and print to screen for approval before printing check. 

• Keep ledgers (including monthly listings of all checks, gross income, FICA, 
taxes, profit sharing, insurance). 

• Error correcting routine lets you change data if you have made a mistake. 

• Handles weekly, bi-weekly, semi-monthly and monthly pay periods. 




New 



Only $79.95 ($2 shpg) 




^*mx& r 



cm 



Box 2 Chicago, IL 60690 



Phone 312/278-1440 

Computer Bulletin Board 312/278-9513 

Retail Store: 1690 Elston, Chicago 



WITH PAYROL/BAS™ YOU'LL ALSO WANT. . . 

941 Program: Gives individual summaries and totals of check information to 

prepare 941 and state unemployment forms. $29.95 ($2 shpg) 
W-2 Program: To cut year- end W-2-s. $29.95 ($2 shpg) 

I VIP WRITER: Powerful word processing program has 

I all standard word-processing features PLUS 

automatic justification, pagination, centering options, 

as well as Error Detection and Undo Mistake features. 

A "flawless" program, according to Rainbow. $68.88 

I (includes VIP Speller) ($2 shpg) 

VIP CALC: Create business spread sheets, get up to 33K of work space in 64K. 

Calculation functions include trigonometry and sorting. $68.88 ($2 shpg) 
VIP DATABASE: Stores data and files of ail kinds and allows you to combine VIP 
Writer files as well. Do mailing lists, inventories, menus and recipes, and more! 
$58.88 ($2 shpg) 

OTHER PROGRAMS FROM HOWARD 

SAP il STOCK ANALYSIS PROGRAM: Stores and tracks your stock portfolio's 

performance. A Howard exclusive. $19.95 {$2 shpg) 
EPSON PRINTER TUTORIAL: Menu driven program that teaches you how to use 

the different commands to unleash the full potential of your Epson printer. $24.95 
($2 shpg) 



Illinois residents add 8% tax. American Express, MasterCard, VISA accepted. 

Howard Medical Computers 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 33 




New Dual Mode Printer 

The new Epson LX-80 offers printing flexibility in 
two modes: one mode allows you to print in a quick 
(100 cps) dot-matrix style for program mm a. and 
graphics, and the Near Letter Quality mode (16 
cps) produces precise (240 dots per inch), 
beautiful type for correspondence, reports, and 
similar purposes. The LX-80 offers 160 different 
type-style combinations, including Pica. Elite, 
Enlarged, Emphasized, Condensed, Subscripts 
and Superscripts, and type-styles can be selected 
quickly from the top control panel or from program 
control Comes standard m friction feed; tractor op- 
tion is also available 

LX-P package includes LX-80 with a serial inter- 
face with 2K buffer, a Color Computer to Epson 
cable, and Printer Tutorial that teacnes you how 
to program the different type styles ($29.95 value). 

LX-P: LX-SO package $317 ($7 shpg) 
ET-1 tractor option for LX*ao. $29.50. 
SF-1 Single-sheet feeder for the LX-Q0 $145 ($7 
shpg) 



RX-80F/T+CLOSEOUT 

RX-P package includes Epson RX-SQF/T+ printer, 
Epson serial interface, a serial Color Computer to 
Epson cable, and free Printer Tutorial. S3 17 ($7 shpg) 

MONITORS 

123 Zenith 12 " Green Screen, 640 dots* 200 dots 
resolution, 15 MHz band width, S1 14 ($7 shpg) 

122 Zenith 12 " Amber Screen, 640 dots x 200 dots 
resolution, 15 MHz band width. $134 ($7 shpg) 

131 Zenith 13" Color Monitor with speaker, com- 
posite & RGB jack, 240 dots x 200 dots resolution, 
2,5 MHz band width. $334 ($14 shpg) 

NEW: 141 Roland 13" Color Monitor with speaker 
270 dotsx200 dots resolution, 4 MHz band width, 
S247 ($12 shpg) 

All monitors require video controller. 

Reverse video free with monitor order 

MEMORY 

64K Upgrades— 1 Year Warranty 
64-E1 for E Boards with complete instructions. Re- 
move old chips and replace with preassembled 
package—no soldering or trace cuts. $52.45 {$2 
shpg) 
64-F1 tor F Boards, Mo soldering needed. Capacitor 

leads must be cut $48.45 ($2 shpg) 
64*2 lor COCO 2. Kit requires one solder point, no 
trace cuts. $48.45 ($2 shpg) 



SURGE SUPPRESSOR 

SS-1 protects your data and equipment against power 
surges and trans rents. $16.25 ($2 shpg) 



CONTROLLERS 

New Controller from J&M: Has switch that allows 
either JOOS or RS DOS to be the disk operating 
system; eliminates software compatibility problems 1 
while preserving the advantages of J&M's gold con 
tacts and data separator. Also added to the DC-2 is 
a parallel port, which means a serial interface is no 
longer needed to make a parallel printer (like the 
Epson} work, 

DC-2 Disk Controller with JDOS. $138 ($2 shpg) 
fiS-1: RS DOS ROM Chip. S20.00 ($2 shpg) 
DC-1 Disk Controller reads and writes to 35 and 40 
track singte and double-sided drives tor aft models 
of the Color Computer w/ JDOS. $128 ($2 shpg) 
VC-1 Video Interface mounts inside Color Computer 
by piggy-backing IC on top of interface— no solder- 
ing, no trace cuts. All models give composite video 
& sound. $24.45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-2 for COCO 2— mono only. $26,45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-3 for COCO 2— both color and monochrome. 

$39,45 ($2 shpg) 
VC-4 for new Color Computer (no sockets, chips are 
soldered to mother board) Attaches with spring- 
loaded clips, Color & mono. $39.45 ($2 shpg) 



EPSON AND J&M 

The EJ-P Package 
The Epson LX-80 Printer teamed with our new 
J&M DC-2 Controller gives you top printing 
capabilities plus built-in switch gives JDOS or 
Radio Shack DOS so all software can run on your 
Color Computer Package includes; Epson LX-80 
Printer with ET-1 tractor option; DC-2 controller; 
parallel Cotor Computer to J&M cable; Epson 
Printer Tutorial ($29.95 value). 

Complete EJ-P package $425.00 ($7 shpg) 



DRIVE O PACKAGE 

359,424 byte package includes half-height, double- 
sided double-density TEAC drive with slim-line case 
and heavy-duty power supply, DC-2 J&M Controller, 
and a gold plated connecting cable. Accesses both 
35 and 40 track disks 

D0»P package $354 ($7 shpg) 



HOWARD QUALITY STANDS 

New TS-1X Mon- 
itor Stand; De- 
signer-beautiful 
stand with clear 
corner posts, 
easy side access 
to ROM port, re- 
set and on/oft 
buttons. $39.50 
(S3 shpg) 
TS-1; Standard 13" monitor stand for the original Color 

Computet". Specify black, ivory or clear. 15" xll" x4" 

$29.50 ($3 shpg) 
TS-2; Same as above for the COCO Z $29,50 ($3 

shpg) 
PS-1X Printer Stand features new noise-suppressing 

foam top and cork base. 15" x11 Jd *2W\ $24.95 ($3 

shpg) 



GUARANTEE 

Howard Medical's 30-day guarantee is meant to 
eliminate the uncertainty of dealing with a com- 
pany through the mail. Once you receive our hard* 
ware, try it out; test it tor compatability It you're 
not happy with it for any reason, return it in 30 days 
and welt give you your money back— no questions 
asked. 




I 



CTrl 



Howard Medical Computers 



1690 Elston, Chicago 60622 



Cat. No Quantity Description 



E3I 

Telephone (312) 278-1440 

Computer Bulletin Board (312) 278-9513 

Unit cost Cost 



□ Bill i circle one) 

□ My check or 

money order C radii Card it _ 
is enclosed 

□ Send COD Expiation date . 

Name 



uc 



Address 

City, State, Zip_ 



Total Cost _ 

Shipping 

III. res. add 8% _ 
COD (add 190) _ 
Total order $ . 






n 




SPEED RACER is a super 
car race game written in 
the POLE POSITION™ type 
of arcade game. It has un- 
believable scrolling 3D 
graphics! Unconditionally 
guaranteed to be the finest 
car race game ever written 
for the COCO. $34.95 
Disk or Tape 32 K. 



CARS PASSED 

'fiiiiimimiHiniMiJiii^ 




I 




• >•:.., 



1» 



576 S Telegraph Road 

Pontiac. Michigan 48053 

Orders & Info: (313) 334-6576 




R AINBOW 

F~^U 



Program your voice into memory 




Analog-To-Digital 
And Back Again 




By Jeremy Spiller 




One of the most interesting aspects of the Color Computer 
is its ability to synthesize sounds, and perhaps the most 
interesting sound of all is the human voice. This very simple 
machine language program will digitalize your voice or any other 
sound that is input through the cassette recorder port, then store 
the data as a linear array of bits in memory. These bits can then 
be used to re-create the original sound. 

All sounds are simply "vibrations" of the air, or more precisely, 
variations in air pressure. They amount to "peaks" of high pressure 
followed by "valleys" of low pressure. How closely the peaks are 
spaced (frequency), and how high the peaks are (amplitude) 
determine the nature of the sound. 

A loudspeaker makes sounds by re-creating the same variations 
in air pressure as the voice or instrument that created them in the 
first place. The original sound is first translated to electrical voltage 
vibrations. The loudspeaker responds to higher voltages by pushing 
its diaphragm farther out, and to lower voltages by allowing the 
diaphragm to fall back inward again. As the diaphragm vibrates, 
it pushes on the surrounding air reproducing the original sound. 
Of course, these vibrations are extremely fast, but your CoCo is 

even faster. 

The Color Computer is able to synthesize sounds because it can 
manipulate the voltage output to the loudspeaker about as quickly 
as the original sound produced its vibrations in the air. It does 
this by manipulating numbers with lightning speed, and those 
numbers are simply ones and zeros. The high pressure "peaks" can 
be thought of as ones, and the low pressure "valleys" correspond 



(Jeremy Spiller is a U-vear-old student who has been an avid computer 
programmer since receiving a TRS-80 CoCo three years ago. He started assembly 
language programming about a year ago, and plans to start writing his own 
machine language games soon.) 



36 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



to zeros. While this is an oversimpli- 
fication of the physics of sound, it is 
still a fairly accurate assessment, and 
one can begin to see how a computer 
can create sounds from simple data. 

With the right combination of ones 
and zeros, you can fabricate any 
sound you want to, including the sound 
of your own voice. But first, you must 
somehow change your voice into the 
correct series of ones and zeros. This 
process is called "digitalizing," and the 
program that does it is called an 
"analog-to-digital converter." It converts 
your voice, which is an analog (con- 
tinuous) signal, into digital data by 
sampling it at regular intervals. 

This data may then be stored in the 
computer's memory, and using a dif- 
ferent program, it may then be retrieved 
and used to re-create the original sound. 
While BASIC may appear fast, it is not 
fast enough to sample the analog signal 
with any precision. On the other hand, 
the CoCo's 6809 microprocessor can 
move fast enough to do the job, but 
you must talk to it directly — through 
a machine language program. 

A complete listing of the assembled 
program is provided. Note that it is 
composed of three separate programs 
strung together. The first program 
digitalizes the tape recorder input and 
stores the input in memory as a 
continuous string of bits. The second 
program retrieves these bits and outputs 
them to the television loudspeaker. The 
third program is actually executed first 
and allows the user to adjust the 
recorder volume for the best fidelity 
possible. By using this option you are 
assured of the clearest possible digital 
array of stored bits. 

How to Use the Program 

First, key in and run the basic driver. 
The data statements contain the as- 
sembled object code that comprises the 
ML program, (Note that each number 
corresponds to a two-digit Hex number 
in the second and third columns of the 
assembly.) 

Next, prepare a tape for digitalizing 
by speaking in a normal voice into the 
microphone. Speak slowly, loudly and 
enunciate clearly. Next, be sure the 
correct jack is connected to the earphone 
plug of the recorder, and that the other 
end of the cord is connected to the 
cassette port on the back of the 
recorder. 4 

Press *r at the menu and press Play 
on the recorder. Turn up the volume 
on your TV. The sound you hear is 



being processed in a way similar to the 
way it will be processed during digital- 
ization and playback. Adjust the 
volume on your recorder so your words 
are as clear as they can be, and the space 
between them as dead as possible. In 
order to break out of this mode, you 
must press the Reset button. You will 
have to rerun the basic driver once you 
break out of the volume check mode. 

Now you are ready to digitalize your 
voice. Prepare the tape so it is at 
the exact beginning of the sounds you 
wish to store in memory. Only the first 
13 or so seconds of input will be stored, 
so be sure your tape is within one or 
two seconds of the signal you prepared 
earlier. Press the Play button on the 
recorder. If the remote pause jack is 
in place, the motor will not start until 
you are ready to begin. Press '2' and 



'With the right 
combination of ones 
and zeros, you can 
fabricate any sound 
you want to, including 
the sound of your own 
voice." 

enter at the menu. Press enter again 
and the digitalizing routine will begin. 
The motor starts and stops automat- 
ically. When the analog to digital 
program is finished, the basic driver 
tells you so. 

Now, to reassemble the data into 
sound, press '3' at the menu. A prompt 
will request a delay number. The default 
value is six. By varying this number, 
you may vary the speed and pitch of 
the playback. You may play it back as 
many times as you wish by pressing '3' 
again and again. 

The quality of the data is affected 
by the volume of the recorder during 
the digitalization segment, so you may 
be able to improve on the quality of 
the sound by going back and re- 
datalizing at a different volume. 

How the Program Works 

If you wish to understand the work- 
ings of the program, please consult the 
assembly listing. While the purpose of 
this article is not to teach assembly 
language programming, I will try to give 
a reasonable explanation of how the 
data is input into the machine, how it 
is stored in memory, and how it is then 



utilized to reproduce the sound. In 
order to understand computer sound 
synthesis, you first must understand the 
mysteries of magic memory-location 
FF2Q. 

FF20 is located in the last 256 bytes 
at the top of ROM which is reserved 
for input/ output functions. While it 
looks to the microprocessor like any 
other memory byte, it is in reality 
"superbyte." While disguised as a mild- 
mannered ordinary byte, it is really 
responsible for communication with the 
cassette port, the printer and the 
loudspeaker of our TV. (And that's only 
while the computer is operating. Who 
knows what it does at night while we're 
asleep!) 

FF20 has eight bits (numbered '0' to 
■7*) like any other byte. Bit zero, located 
farthest to the right, i$ solely responsible 
for all input and output to and from 
the cassette port. Its main function is 
to send and receive binary information 
to and from the computer from cassette 
tape. It was designed for use with signals 
tha^t are already digitalized (i.e., tape 
saves of programs), however, it does 
respond to any other noises that come 
through the cassette port, including 
voices. 

If the volume on the cassette recorder 
is correct, it produces a reasonable 
representation of most sounds in ones 
and zeros. The analog-to-digital con- 
verter collects the ones and zeros and 
stores them, one by one, in memory. 
It begins by defining the first memory 
location designated for storage of data 
as &H2500 in Line J 10. 

Line 120 resets all bits in FF20 to 
zerps. Line 130 sets the count to eight, 
the number of bits in each byte. Lines 
150 to 170 are simply a timing loop. 
They make the computer count to six 
between bits. Location &H790B con- 
tains the number six. By poking other 
numbers into this location, you can get 
the computer to wait for a longer or 
shorter time between storing bits. 
Changing this number changes both the 
length of tape digitalized and the quality 
of the sound in the reproduction. 

Remember that while all this is going 
on, bit zero is changing back and 
forth between zeros and ones in response 
to the input from the tape recorder. 
Lines 172 and 174 are the real "meat" 
in this program — 112 does an LSR 
(Logical Shift Right) of Location FF20. 
this shifts all the bits in FF20 one place 
to the right. In other words, bit seven 
is moved over into the position of bit 
six, bit six is moved over to the position 

June 1985 THE RAINBOW 37 




VIP Integrated 

. •■ TM 

Library 



VIP Desktop Magic! 



Finally, you can have the power and integration of Lotus Symphony , 
1 2 3™ or Open Access™ for the larger micros on your Color 
Computer! The convenience of instant changes to a new application 
and effortless transfer of files is at the tip of your finger. 

With VIP Desktop, the six applications ofVIP Library are integrated 
into one program, on one disk. You have instant access to word 
processing, with a spelling checker always in attendance, data 
management with mail merge, spreadsheet financial analysis, tele- 
communications and disk maintenance. Just move the hand to point 
to the volume, and the new application is there. And VIP Integrated 
Library has been made to work well with one disk drive, or all four, so 
be readv to push your Color Computer to the limits! 



Elegance! 

VIP Integrated Library is a product with finesse, inside and out. 
Inside is one awesome but very elegant program. On the outside, it 
comes handsomely bound in two cloth covered, gold embossed 
binders with slipcases - like those you get with software for the 
Tandy 2000™. And remember, to get software of this quality for the 
Tandy 2000 you would have to pay hundreds more! 



Stand-Alone Power 

VIP Integrated Library is not one of those slip-shod, all-in-one 
slicer-dicer machines, good for one day and then you throw it away. 
It fully integrates the six top-of-the-line stand-alone programs 
described in the following pages: VIP Writer, VIP Speller, VIP Calc, 
VIP Database, VIP Terminal & VIP Disk-Zap. You c^n buy the entire 
Integrated Library at once, or you can buy one or two programs that 
you need now and upgrade to the integrated Library later. t 



Shared Files, Shared Features 

All VIP Integrated Library applications share common iei 
such as ease of use, built-in help, the same commands, full f 
control, full use of your 64K of memory, and step-by-step tut 
Most important, all essential applications feature profession 
resolution lowercase displays to give you a choice of 51, 64, 
characters per line, with 21 or 24 lines per screen. You 
professional display on your Color Computer without any har 
modification! 

Buy the Integrated Library for 

$149.95 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0213 

Or buy the individual volumes separately, 
as shown on the following pages!! 



The most powerful 



VIP Writer© 

RATED TOPS IN RAINBOW v 

COLOR COMPUTER MAGAZINE & COMPUTER USER 

The most powerful and easy-to-use word processor is available in 
the showpiece and workhorse of the Library: The VIP Writer™. 

The result of two years of research, the VIP Writer™ offer every 
feature you could desire from a word processor. It is the most 
powerful, fastest, most dependable and most versatile. With the hi- 
res display, workspace and compatibility features built into the 
Library the Writer is also the most usable. 

". . . Nearly every feature and option possible to implement on the 
Color Computer The design of the program is excellent; the 
programming is flawless. October 1983 "Rainbow" 

Among word processors for the CoCo, VIP Writer stands alone as 
the most versatile most professional program available/' May 1984 



The Writer will work with you and your printer to do things you 
always wanted to do. Every feature of your printer can be put to use, 
every character set, every graphics capability at any baud rate, EVEN 
PROPORTIONAL SPACING. All this with simplicity and elegance. 

Professional features of particular note: 

-Memory-Sense with BANK SWITCHING to fully utilize 64 K, giving not just 



_TRUE FORMAT WINDOW allowing you to 
THE SCREEN BEFORE PRINTING, showing c 
NOTES, page breaks, page numbers, & margi 
characters. It makes HYPHENATION a snap. 
"A TRUE EDITING WINDOW in all 9 displ 



I FREEDOM to imbed any num 
EVEN JUSTIFIED TEXT. 

■ Full 4-way cursor control, so 
any BASIC program or ASCII 
INSERT, LOCATEANDCHANC 



berof PRINTER CONTROL CODES anywhere, 



ile, SEVEN D 



■ Automatic justification, automatic pagina 
matic flush right, underlining, superscripts, 
sheet pause, and print comments. 

■ Type-ahead, typamatic key repeat and I 
DETECTION and UNDO MISTAKE features 



iLETF FUNCTIONS, LINE 
ptoTFN.SIMULTANEOUS 
lable tabs, display memory 
footers and FOOTNOTES. 



o for the pros, ERROR 
3RAMMABLE functions, 



Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0141 

32K (Comes with tape & disk) $69.95 

VIP Writer VIP Speller Combo comes in VIP Writer Binder. 



- Irt*r ( jfc-j Wiii Re-ai Power 

n>rcrt you mt\i tte p»*r of i reil «-d whyi*, 
atwn yo<j M-sftt up t>: 8' frvrAir's per line ttith 
your Color- Oip;ter, tfer, yjv mnt to «afce jour 
' printer raallu now, ycj . neeo. VIP Hr iter. 

WP Hriter is * jtite-ot-tr*-*--*. tnr-i p-ooassftr 
for the fro*. It ii sn^ed nit* cotMy.dj, features 
*nd e-ptions. yet iff *inpU *.■: learn wl use. tt*» 
«1$« gives you err! hi help, n-d ever en Urdo 
coniurt to undo nsU-:*;* 

fi nest featura is fi-s Fre/ie* U:r.$>. «!u-:* you 
5*4 ir> uss he-a. Th.ir *eatL** -allow >m I: ,<u* 

rw? tent U- : t as it will te prihU: - «r>tar*a 
i*.l*s, p*g4*fitn5*ri-' fwtnjtw, euer .JJi-l-I^TI-W 
for *v«"» left *">d rigv.-Ssri nsrjn-! i: 
cyejs work. VI? U-j*e- i. ! y.r 4->i*=H 
i) 1 Ltf 1 CH 1 l* * F* r A 



VIP Speller™ 

VIP Speller 1 " is the fastest and most user-friendly speller for your 
CoCo. It can be used to correct any ASCII file— including VIP 
Library'" files and files from Scripsit™ and Telewriter™. It automatically 
checks files for words to be corrected; marked for special attention 
or even added to the dictionary. You can even view the word in context, 
with upper and lowercase. VIP Speller™ comes with a specially 
edited 50,000 word dictionary, and words can be added to or 
deleted from the dictionary or you can create one of your own. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0142 
32K DISK ONLY $49.95 



Requires 64K and ( 



'rams do not work with J DOS 



VIP Database™ VIP Terminal 



"ONE OF THE BEST" JULY 1984 "RAINBOW" 

This high speed MACHINE LANGUAGE program fills all your 
information management needs, be they for your business or home. 
And it does eo better than any other database program for the Color 
Computer, featuring machine code, lowercase screens and mail- 
merge capabilities. Inventory, accounts, mailing lists, family histories 

you name it # VIP Database™ will keep track of all your data, and it will' 
merge VIP Writer" files. 

The VIP Database" features selectable lowercase displays for 
maximum utility. It will handle as many records as fit on your disks. It 
is structured in a simple and easy to understand menu system with 
full prompting for easy operation. Your data is stored in records of 
your own design. All files are fully indexed for speed and efficiency. 
Full sort of records is providedofor easy listing of names, figures, 
addresses, etc., in ascending or descending alphabetic or numerical 
order. Records can be searched for specific entries, using'muitiple 
search criteria. With database form merge you may also combine 
files, sort and print mailing lists, print "boiler plate" documents 
address envelopes - the list is endless. The math package even per- 
forms arithmetic operations and updates other fields! Unlimited 
print format and report generation with the ability to imbed control 
codes for use with all printers. 

Radio Shack Catalog No. 90-0140 
32K DISK $59.95 

64K Required for math package & mail meree 




MrtS J*i- in thi to 
•lfttfiCitK OM 

Mm Deposit 
tWl» Safww 

WIS hint L;. H j, Hrdur 



Cte; Is Deposits BiLtwe 1 



VIPCalc™ 

"MORE USABLE FEATURES" FEB 1985 RAINBOW 



VIPCalc'" istrulythe finest and easilythe most powerful electronic 
worksheet and financial modeling program available for the Color 
Computer. Now every Color Computer owner has access to a 
calculating and planningtool betterthan VisiCalc™, containing its 
features and commands and then some, WITH USABI.F DISPLAYS. 

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of bit five and so on, right down to 
bit zero, which appears to fall off the 
right end into oblivion. 

Actually, this bit is saved in a special 
location called "the carry" which is one 
bit in a special register called the 
"condition codes. "This is most fortunate 
because bit zero, now saved in the carry, 
contains the information we are inter- 
ested in storing in memory. 

Now that we have the bit stored in 
the carry, we want to store it some place 
in memory. Line 174 does this with an 
ROLA. A register is a memory location 
within the microprocessor itself used for 
the temporary storage of numbers. The 
'A' register is an eight-bit register, just 
like any memory location. "ROLA" 
means Rotate the 'A' register one bit 
to the left. This is something like a 
Logical Shift Left, except that all bits 
are shifted to the left, the leftmost bit 
(bit seven) goes into the carry, and the 
bit that was in the carry before now 
becomes the new bit zero in the 'A' 
register. 

If this process were repeated contin- 
uously, you would see the bits marching 
to the left, circling around through the 
carry and back again into register 'A' 
from right to left. A single cycle of this 
has now put the contents of the carry 
into the 'A' register in the position of 
bit zero. 

This process will be repeated a total 
of eight times, each repetition shifting 
the important bit zero out of FF20 into 
the carry, and then rotating it into 
register 'A.' Each rotation carries the 
previously rotated bits in register 'A' 
one more place to the left until the first 
one rotated in now occupies the position 
of bit seven. 

Line 190 subtracts one from the "8 
count" (remember Line 130), and Line 
200 sends the microprocessor back to 
Line 150 for another rotation if it has 
not filled the 'A' register with eight bits 
of data from FF20. If Register *A' is 
now full of the input data, Line 210 
then stores it in the memory location 
&H2500 (The 'X' register still is "point- 
ing to" &H2500 from Line 110), then 
increments the pointer by one (the 'X' 
register now holds the number &H2501). 

The entire cycle is repeated until all 
memory locations from &H2500 to 
&H7900 are filled with data. Line 220 
checks to see if the data has reached 
the top of RAM. If it has not, Line 
230 sends the microprocessor back to 
Line 130, otherwise Line 240 returns 
control to BASIC. 

Lines 280 to 480 work in a similar 



way to retrieve the stored data. In order 
to hook FF20 to the TV loudspeaker, 
a few other "adjustments" must be made 
in other ROM locations. These adjust- 
ments are made in a subroutine named 
"sound" and that subroutine is called 
in Line 280. The microprocessor then 
follows the instructions in lines 600 to 
680 and then returns to Line 365. 

The mechanics of the sound routine 
are not important to an understanding 
of this program. What is important is 
an understanding of how FF20 controls 
the output voltage to the loudspeaker. 
Once enabled by the sound routine, the 
six most significant (i.e., leftmost) bits 
in FF20 are now available to hold 
binary numbers from zero to 63. Each 
number represents a voltage between 
zero (represented by zeros in all six 
bits) and -5 volts (represented by ones 
in all six bits [63 decimal]). 



Any number stored in these six bits 
is immediately translated into a 
voltage at the loudspeaker. The trick 
is now to get the bits out of memory 
and into the left end of FF20. This is 
accomplished by once again loading the 
pointer with the location of the first byte 
in memory (Line 365) and loading 
register 'A' with the contents of $H2500 
(Line 370). 

(Note that the pointer is incremented 
at this point instead of later on as was 
the case in the digitalizing program.) 

Line 380 again sets the count to eight. 
This time, however, the 'A' register is 
shifted left instead of to the right. This 
pushes the most significant bit into the 
carry. Line 400 now rotates FF20 to 
the right which pushes our data bit from 
the carry into position seven in FF20. 
This causes an immediate change in the 
voltage output to the loudspeaker. 
Again, the process is carried out eight 
times until all eight bits from memqry 
have been rotated into FF20. 

Line 470 now sends us back to Line 
370 where register 'A' picks up the next 
byte and rotates that into FF20, and 
so on until all the data to the top of 
RAM is used up. 

The Volume Check Routine is easy 
to understand. It also makes use of the 
sound enable subroutine and then 
simply rotates bit zero of FF20 through 
the carry and into bit seven which 
controls the loudspeaker. 

Playing with the Binary Program 

Once you have loaded the machine 
language program in high RAM, you 
can discard the basic program that 



poked it in by typing NEW and then 
fabricate your own programs that 
manipulate the timing loops or change 
the origin of the data array. 

Remember that &H790B contains a 
six, but that you can speed up or slow 
down the program by poking different 
numbers here. Smaller numbers will 
give a higher quality sound, but a 
shorter real-time recording. The play- 
back segment also has a timing loop, 
and location &H792F also contains a 
six. The basic driver has a provision 
to manipulate this number, but you can 
do the same thing by poking any 
number into &H792F. 

Since the machine language programs 
can stand alone, it is possible to 
include them as a "talking subroutine" 
in your BASIC programs. Patch 1, or 
the digitalizing routine, is a complete 
program and will stand alone without 
Patch 2 or Patch 3. Patch 2 is the 
playback routine; it requires that Patch 
3, which includes the sound enable 
subroutine, be included with it. 

These programs are not relocatable, 
but if you want to use the playback 
routine alone without the A/D conver- 
ter, you can do it as long as you 
remember to poke Patch 2 beginning 
at &H791F, followed by Patch 3 ending 
at &H795C. Remember to protect these 
routines along with your digitalized 
data with CLERR 200, &H****. The 
asterisks, of course, stand for a number. 
This number should be one lower than 
the first byte used to store your digital 
data. To set this address, consult the 
summary of key pokes. 




y^s^^^^&0^^^§S^^^i 







||H7922:&H7923 — Contain the ad- 



dress 



CH790B ■, 



a array 

ifllllll 



lllilllf llSSili ■--■'" Default- 6 ■■■■ 



(Anyone having questions about 
these programs may contact Jeremy at 
RFD #1, Shirley, MA 01464, phone 
(617)448-2681.) 



40 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



#^ 



130 . 
END 



.224 
..12 



Listing l:fVD DRVR 

CLS: PMQDE0: GOTO 350 

10 CLEAR200,&H24FF I 

15 'PATCH 1 I — 

20 DATA SE^S.aB^F^F^BiC^.BB, 

10,aE t 00,06,31,3F,26,FC,74,FF,20 

, 49, 5A, 26, Fl ^7,80,8^79, 00, 25, E 

B,39 

25 'PATCH 2 

30 DATA BD, 23, 8E, 25, 00, A6, 80, C6, 

08, 48, 76, FF, 20, 10, BE, 00, 04, 31, 3F 

,26,FC,5A,26,F1,8C,79,00,25,EB,3 

9 

35 'PATCH 3 

40 DATA 8D,05,76,FF,20,20,FB,B6, 

FF,01,84,F7,B7,FF,01,B6,FF,03,84 

,F7,B7,FF,03,B6,FF,23,8A,0B,B7,F 

F.23,39 

50 FDR X-&H7900 TO &H791E:READ A 

*: A=VAL("&H"+A*) :P1=P1+As POKE X, 

A:NEXT 

60 FOR X=&H791F TO fcH793C:READ A 

*! A=VAL < "S«H"+A*> : P2=»P2+A) POKE X , 

A: NEXT 

70 FOR X-&H793D TO &H795C:READ A 

*iA=VAL("&H"+A*>:P3*P3+A:P0KE X, 

A: NEXT 

B0 IF P1O3092THENPR TNT" ERROR IN 

PATCH l"sE-l 
90 IF P202852THENPR INT "ERROR IN 

PATCH 2":E=1 
100 IF P3O4499THENPRINT"ERR0R I 
N PATCH 3"iE=l 
110 IF E=l THEN STOP 
120 CLS 

130 PRINT" ANAL08 TO DIGITAL CO 
NVERTER" 
140 PRINT" 
R" 
150 
160 



BY JEREMY SPILLE 



PRINT 
PRINT"1. 
RECORDER" 

170 PRINT"2. 

ZE) " 

180 PRINT'3. 



TEST VOLUME OF TAPE 



READ TAPE (DIGITAL I 



SAY DATA < PLAYBACK) 



190 PRINT 

200 INPUT" PICK A NUMBER" | A 

210 ON A GOTO 230,280,310 

220 GOTO 120 

230 CLS 

240 PRINT"TD GET BACK TO MENU PR 

ESS RESET THEN RUN THIS PROGRAM. 

II 

250 PRINT 

260 PR INT "SET YOUR TAPE RECORDER 
TO THE CORRECT VOLUME" 



270 MOTORON:EXEC WH793D 

2B0 CLS; INPUT "ENTER TO RECORD" 5 ft 

:MOTORON:CLS 

290 PR I NT "READING TAPE 1 ': EXEC &H7 

900:MDTOROFF 

300 60T0 120 

310 CLS: INPUT "TYPE A NUMBER 1-13 
TO CONTROL THE SPEED. ENTER 
OR & m DE- FAULT" J St IF B-0 TH 

EN S-A 

320 IF SMS THEN 310 

330 CLSs PR I NT "SAY INS": POKE &H792 

F,SsEXEC 8eH791F 

340 GOTO 120 

350 PCLEARlsGOTO10 

Listing 2: R/D PRGM 



7900 
7900 
7903 
7906 
7908 
790C 
790E 
7910 
7913 
7914 
7915 
7917 
7919 
791C 
791E 



791F 
7921 
7924 
7926 
7928 
7929 
792C 
7930 
7932 
7934 
7935 
7937 
7 93 A 
793C 



8S 

7F 

C6 

108E 

31 

26 

74 

49 

3A 

26 

A7 

ec 

25 
39 



8D 

8E 

A6 

C6 

43 

76 

108E 

31 

26 

5A 

26 

ec 

25 
39 



250O 

FF20 

08 

0006 

3F 

FC 

FF20 



Fl 
80 

7900 
E8 



23 

2500 
80 
08 

FF20 
0006 

FC 

Fl 
7900 

m 



793D 8D 05 

793F 76 FF20 

7942 20 FB 

7944 B6 FF01 

7947 84 F7 

7949 B7 FF01 

794C B6 FF03 

794F 84 F7 

7951 B7 FF03 

7954 B6 FF23 

7957 8A 08 

7959 B7 FF23 
795C 39 

0000 
00000 TOTAL ERRORS 



00010 
00020 
00030 
00040 
00050 
00100 
00110 
00120 
00130 
00150 
00160 
00170 
00172 
00174 
00190 
00200 
00210 
00220 
00230 
00240 
00250 
00260 
00270 
00280 
00365 
00370 
00360 
00390 
00400 
00410 
00420 
00430 
00440 
00450 
00460 
00470 
00480 
00490 
00500 
00510 
00520 
00530 
00540 
00600 
00610 
00620 
00630 
00640 
00650 
00660 
00670 
00680 
00690 
00700 



************************* 

* SIMPLE A/D CONVERTER * 

* BY JEREMY SPLLLER * 

* 1985 * 
************************* 

ORG $7900 

START LDX #$Z5QQ 

CLR $FF20 

ST010 LDB tf$8 

TIME LDY #6 

TIME2 LEAY -1 ,Y 

BNE TIME2 

LSR $FF20 
ROLA 
DECB 

BNE TIME 

STA ,X+ 

CHEK #$7900 

BL0 ST010 

RTS 
************************* 

* RECONSTRUCTS SOUNDS * 

•A******************;**** W 



SOUND1 

S0UND2 

TIMER 
TIMER2 



BSR 

LDX 

LDA 

LDB 

LSLA 

R0R 

LDY 

LEAY 

BNE 

DECB 

BNE 

CMPX 

3L0 

RTS 
************************* 

* VOLUME CHECK ROUTINE * 
************************* 

BSR 
R0R 
BRA 
LDA 
ANDA 



SOUND 
#$2 500 

#8 

3FF20 

-UY 
TIIIER2 

SOUND2 
#$7900 
SOUND1 



VOLUME 



SOUND 



STA 

LDA 

ANDA 

STA 

LDA 

OKA 

STA 

RTS 

END 



SOUND 

$FF20 

VOLUME 

$FF01 

#$F7 

$FF01 

$FF03 

#$F7 

$FF03 

$FF23 

#8 

$FF23 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 41 



iiti);lM 




Simplifying 

u " 



se o 



F th 



C 



omman 



W,ll,am R. White 




42 THE RAINBOW June 1965 




Do you love computer music, but 
hate entering long command 
lines? Frustrated because you 
can't use your hard-learned music 
lessons? Still using your 4K or non- 
extended machine? 

If so, cheer up fellow programmers, 
this article is for you! If adding music 
to enliven a program appeals to you, 
read on. 

When you first got your CoCo and 
excitedly began Getting Started With 
Color BASIC* one of the first places you 
probably "stalled" was the 5DUND 
chapter. Admit it! We all did. Creating 
sounds (music, if you prefer) is fun! But 
soon the drudgery of SOUND, "tone 1 ' and 
"duration" wore out the fingers and the 
sound command was put on the back 
shelf, 

Listing I is the BASIC program for 
"Happy Birthday." It contains the 
traditional SOUND commands. Listing I 
works very well, if you don't mind 
entering individual command lines and 
constantly referring to the musical tones 
appendix. However, 1 suspect that none 
of us wants the extra effort of repeatedly 
turning to a reference page. 

Let's put some of the RAM memory 
power to work! Listing 2 contains the 
same program, this time with the tone 
values given as simple numeric variables 
and neatly tucked away in memory. 



(William White has taught junior high 
school science for 20 years. His hobbies 
include amateur radio, photography 
and "CoCo-ing." This is his first year 
of teaching computer literacy and his 
first published article.) 



Once they have been defined (lines 100- 
110) the tone value can be called by 
use of its label (a letter). Time values 
are stored (Line 120) and called to use 
by their proper label (tetter). Using this 
method, the note lengths in the entire 
song can be quickly changed by reas- 
signing values of time variables. Try 
that with your PLAV command! 

Once these numeric variables have 
been defined, a valid command line is 
"SOUND letter, letter" (i,e., SOUND C,Z). 
You have already saved keystrokes, 
your memory and there are no numbers 
to remember! Now you are free to 
concentrate on the music, not on a 
reference page. 

Another method of accomplishing 
the same end is shown in Listing 3. DRTfl 
statements are composed of note values 
followed by the time value. When this 
information has been written into DATA, 
it is read in the same sequence and 
executed by one (that's right, just one) 
SOUND statement. Again our efforts are 




June 1985 THE RAINBOW 43 



conserved by using the power and 
efforts of the mighty CoCo. 

Entering either listing 1 or 2 requires 
the use of 25 SOUND statements. By 
using Listing 3, SOUND is entered just 
once and made to repeat by the FOR/ 
NEXT loop. This savES keystrokes, 
memory and needless repetition. 



Our objective at the outset was to 
simplify the use of the SOUND command. 
One method shown does this by defining 
tone numbers as variables. The other 
eliminates the need to repeatedly enter 
the SOUND statement. 

For you who have worn out (or 
thrown out) the "Appendix of Musical 



Tones," the octave of Middle C is as 
follows: Middle C=89, D=108, E=!25, 
F=133, F#=140, G=147, A=159, B=I70, 
B^l65andCl=176. 

There you have it! Dust off the old 
music books, do your thing, call in the 
family and have a sing-a-long. After all, 
computers are fun! 



Listing 1: BRTHDRV1 

10 ' PROGRAM LISTING 1 

20 '*♦*#########*#*##*#»######## 

30 '# 'HAPPY BIRTHDAY 

40 '# USING SOUND TONE, DURATION 

50 '# NOV., 19B4 W. WHITE 

60 '#***#**##***##«##**########« 

70 ' 

80 CLS 

90 PRINT" PLAYING HAPPY BIRT 

HDAY" 

100 SOUND 89,4 

110 SOUND 89,4 

120 SOUND 108,8 

130 SOUND B9,8 

140 SOUND 133,8 

150 SOUND 125,16 

160 SOUND B9,4 

170 SOUND 89,4 

180 SOUND 108,8 

190 SOUND 89,8 

200 SOUND 147,8 

210 SOUND 133,16 

220 SOUND 89,4 

230 SOUND 89,4 

240 SOUND 176,B 

250 SOUND 159,8 

260 SOUND 133,8 

270 SOUND 125,8 

280 SOUND 108,B 

290 SOUND 165,4 

300 SOUND 165,4 

310 SOUND 159,8 

320 SOUND 133,8 

330 SOUND 147,8 

340 SOUND 133,8 

350 END 

Listing 2: BRTHDRV2 

10 ' PROGRAM LISTING 2 

20 '**#####*###»»«»###*#*##*#» 

30 '# 'HAPPY BIRTHDAY' 

40 '* USING DEFINED VARIABLES 

50 '# NOV., 19B4 W. WHITE 

60 '**##*######*##**########*#* 



70 ' 

80 CLS (3) 

90 PRINT" PLAYING HAPPY BIRTHD 
AY" 

100 C=*89sD='10B:E=125sF=133! 8=147 
110 A=159sB=170s Bl=165» 01=176 
120 X«4i Y=8s 2=16 
130 SOUND C,X : SOUND C,X : SOUN 
D D,Y : SOUND C,Y : SOUND F,Y s 
SOUND E,Z 

140 SOUND C,X : SOUND C,X : SOUN 
D D,Y : SOUND C,Y : BOUND G,Y : 
SOUND F,Z 

150 SOUND C,X : SOUND C,X i SOUN 
D C1,Y i SOUND A,Y s SOUND F,Y ! 
SOUND E,Y : SOUND D,Y s SOUND B 
1,X s SOUND B1,X 

160 SOUND A,Y : SOUND F,Y : SOUN 
D G,Y s SOUND F,Y 
170 END 

Listing 3: BRTHDAY3 

10 * PROGRAM LISTING 3 

20 * #*##*#****#**##*#####***■* 

30 '# 'HAPPY BIRTHDAY' 

40 '* PLAY USING DATA STATEMENTS 

50 *# NOV., 19B4 W. WHITE 

60 ' ##*######***######*#*♦#### 

70 ' 

80 CLS (3) 

90 PRINT" PLAYING HAPPY BIRTHD 

AY U 

100 DATA 89,4,89,4, 108, B, 89, 8, 13 

3,8,125,16 

110 DATA 89,4,09,4, 108, B,B9, 8, 14 

7,8,133,16 

120 DATA 89,4,89,4, 176,8, 159, B,l 

33,8,125,8,108,8 

130 DATA 165,4, 165,4, 159,8, 133, B 

,147,8,133,8 

140 FOR R=l TO 25 

150 READ S,T 

160 SOUND S,T 

170 NEXT 

180 END m 



t 



fc? 



rj 



*i£ 



I 



$=± 



± 



i 



¥*ff 



I 



44 



THE RAINBOW June 19S5 




EDUCATION NOTE 



RAINBOW, 
'- •-" I 



A Serendipitous 
Learning Experience 



By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Sometimes it is important to present 
students with an educational 
program that is mostly for fun. 
Entertainment remains one of the 
primary reasons many of us bought 
computers in the first place. This 
month's program attempts to combine 
learning with fun. 

Although it is loosely intended as a 
language arts program, there is really 
no definite learning that is expected 
from this program. Many incidental 
learnings, however, may occur that we 
are not always aware of at the moment. 
Incidental learning is learning that is 
not necessarily designed to happen, but 
rather occurs as a side effect of the 
experience. Typing in computer pro- 
grams from magazines, for example, 
often produces the incidental learning 
of the keyboard. Another example 
might be shopping with your family in 
a department store. This may produce 
incidental learning about using money, 
travel training, reading signs and a host 
of others. 

(Steve Blyn teaches both exceptional 
and gifted children, holds two master's 
degrees and has won awards for the 
design of programs to aid the handi- 
capped. He and his wife, Cheryl, own 
Computer Island.) 



The game we are doing this month 
is a code breaker. The alphabet is 
written on the screen with a number 
next to each letter. Next to the letter 
'A' is a '1,' next to 'B' is a '2,' and so 
on down to the letter 'Z' with a "26" 
next to it. This represents a simple code. 
Each letter may be associated with a 
different number. The numbers, of 
course, range from 1 to 26 to represent 
each of the letters. 

A word should be entered by someone 
other than the player; this is a good 
two-player game. The computer will 
show the child the word in code and 
the child's job is to decode the secret 
word. For example, if someone types 
in the word COCO, the program will 
convert it into "3 - 15 - 3 - 15." The 
player must use the chart or his/her 
memory of the alphabetical order to 
decode the word back again to its 
original form. 

This game may be played on two 
levels. You may either choose to have 
the code visible or invisible while you 
are decoding. If you choose to hide the 
code, you will have to review the 
alphabetical order mentally several 
times to figure out the word. This is 
much more difficult, of course, than 
leaving the code in view. 

Younger players will most probably 



need the code visible at all times. Older 
players will no doubt hide the code each 
round. Middle-of-the-road learners will 
probably combine the two and benefit 
the most from this program; they can 
constantly be learning and reviewing 
the alphabetical order while playing the 
game. 

Lines 400-430 draw the code. Line 
450 will hide the code if that option 
is selected. Lines 120-140 present the 
option of hiding the code. 

An easy possibility for altering this 
program is to present the letters and 
numbers in reverse order. The letter 'A' 
could be equivalent to 26, 'B' to 25, and 
so on to 'Z' equal to one. This would 
make the code slightly more difficult 
and the program more challenging. 
Two lines must be altered to accomplish 
this switch. 

First, change Line 250 from 
PRINT ASC(L$)~G4; 

to 
PRINT RSC(L$)-91; 
Secondly, change the portion of Line 
410 which reads 
R$(R) 

to 
R${27~R) 

These two changes will reverse the 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 45 



position of the numbers. You may get 
more daring and devise your own 
schemes to further mix up the numbers, 
if you desire. 

The partner types in the letters of the 
mystery word on lines 160-210. The 
computer converts these letters into 



numbers on lines 220-270. The player 
then guesses the secret word. If incorrect, 
the right answer will be displayed by 
Line 320. 

We meant no pressure to be on the 
student in this program. For this 
reason, we included no time limit or 



report card. The game can be ended 
after each round by pressing 'E' or 
continued with more examples by 
pressing 'M.' The game can be played 
as long as the interest remains. We hope 
your children have fun as well as 
incidentally learn at the same time. 




The listing: CDDEURD5 



10 REM "SECRET CODE WORDS" 

20 REM "STEVE BLYN, COMPUTER ISLAN 

D, NY, 1985" 

30 DIM N<26) ,A*(26) 

40 CLS 

50 C*-"" 

60 PR I NTS 10," SECRET CODES" 

70 PRINTG32, STRING* <32, 191); 

80 FOR A-1T0 26: N(A)=A:NEXTA 

90 FORB- 1 TO 26 : A* ( B > =CHR* ( 64+B ) s 

NEXT B 

100 GOSUB 390 

110 SOUND 200,3 

120 PRINTS64," DO YOU WANT TO HI 

DE THE CODE?" 

130 EN*=INKEY* 

140 IF EN*="Y" THEN GOSUB 450 EL 

SE IF EN*="N" THEN 150 ELSE 130 

150 SOUND 220,3 

160 PRINT@64," TYPE IN YOUR MYST 

ERY WORD NOW. " 

170 B*-INKEY* 

180 IF B*-CHR*<13) THEN 220 

190 C*=C*+B* 

200 IF B*="" THEN 170 

210 GOTO 170 



220 REM "PR I NT OUT THE WORD USING 

NUMBERS" 
230 FOR T=l TO LEN<C*> 
240 L*«MID*<C*,T,1) 
250 PRINT ASC<L*>-64; 
260 PRINTCHR*<8);: PRINT"-"; 
270 NEXT T 

280 PR I NT: PR I NT" WHAT DO YOU THI 
NK THE WORD IS " ; 
290 INPUT M* 

300 PRINTSTRING*(32,".">; 
310 IF M*=C# THEN PRINT" 

CORRECT " s SOUND 1 80 , 5 
320 IF M*OC* THEN PR I NT" SORRY, T 
HE ANSWER IS " ; C*: SOUND 10, 3 
330 PRINTSTRING*<32,".">; 
340 PR I NT "PRESS *M' FOR MORE OR 
'E' TO END"; 
350 EN*=INKEY* 
360 IF EN*«"E" THEN CLS: END 
370 IF EN*="M" THEN 40 
380 GOTO 350 

390 PRINT@321,STRING*<30,236); 
400 REM"PRINT THE CODE" 
410 FOR R=l TO 26:PRINTN<R);CHR* 

(8);"=";A*(R);sNEXT R 

420 PRINT@481, STRING* (30, 227); 

430 RETURN 

440 REM"HIDE THE CODE" 

450 PRINT6352, STRING* (128, 143);: 

RETURN 



Robotize Your Co Co with EMC 



Our unique expansion hardware enables you to create a versatile automated control system. 
All EMC boards come fully assembled and computer tested. 

Model 100 Parallel Port (PIA) $39.95 

Features: Two 8 Bit Bi- Directional Ports, 4 Control Lines, Sample Software Provided 

Model 200 Buss Driver $89.95 

Features: TTL, Fanput of 1 0, 2 Card Slots and Flexible Ribbon Buss Provided. 
Additional Connectors Available. 

Model 400 Mother Board $44.95 

Features: 4 Slots, 5 Gold Pin Connectors, PC Board, for all Addr. Decoded Boards. 

Model 500 Motor Control Amp $29.95 

Features: TTL Compatable, LED Direction Indicators, Drives DC Motors 500 MA 
Maxat12VDC. 



Purchases Add $3.00 Shipping & Handling with Check • Shipping is FREE 

with Money Orders • Florida residents add 5% sales tax • Send for 

FREE Brochure • For Information Call (813) i 896-8295 





MODEL 100 





MODEL 400 

ELECTRONIC MOTION CONTROL 

P.O. Box 27271 «ARPT Station 
Clearwater, Florida 33516 

Dealer Inquiries Welcome 



46 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



Protect Your Valuable Magazine Collection With . . . 




Every single issue of THE RAINBOW is a vital resource 
that you will refer to again and again for new insights, 
to explore new areas of interest or simply to refresh your 
memory. So, you need to keep your copies of the rainbow 
safe — in high-quality, vinyl binders that provide complete 
protection. 

These distinctive red binders not only ensure that your 
RAtNBOWs stay in mint condition, but they showcase your 
collection as well Each binder is clearly embossed with 
the magazine's name in gold lettering on both the front 




DISTINCTIVE 
AND DURABLE 
RAINBOW BINDERS 



and the spine. They're a handsome addition to any decor. 

They also make it possible for you to organize your 
workspace and eliminate the clutter on a permanent basis. 
You will spend more time on your CoCo and eliminate 
those frustrating searches for misplaced magazines. 

A set of two handsome binders, which hold a full 12 
issues of THE RAINBOW is only SI 3.50 (please add $2.50 
for shipping and handling). 



Special Discounts On Past Issues With This Offer 



To help you complete your collection of THE RAINBOW, 
weVe offering a special discount on past issues with the 
purchase of one or more sets of binders. 

When you place an order for six or more back issues 
of the rainbow at the same time you order your binders, 
you are entitled to SI off each magazine, which normally 
sells for the single issue cover price. For an order form, 
please refer to our "Back Issue Information" page (check 



Table of Contents under departmental listings). Also with 
this offer, copies of the "Official And Compleat Index To 
THE RAINBOW" (a comprehensive index of Rainbow's first 
three years, July 198! through June 1984), usually priced 
at $2,50, may be purchased for only $1 with a set of binders. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you order the back 
issues that you want now while supplies last. 



sets of binder(s) at $13.50 each (plus $2.50 for shipping and handling. 



YES, Please send me 

If your order is to be sent via U.S. Mail to a post office box or to another countryr p lease add $1 
Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax). 

1 also want to take advantage of the special savings of $1 off single issue cover price for back issues 
with the purchase of a set of binders. (Minimum order of 6 magazines. An order form from a recent 
issue indicating the back issues you wish to receive should accompany this order.) 

I want to purchase the comprehensive index to THE RAINBOW (July 1981 through June 1984) at the 
special price of $1 (regular price $2.50) with my purchase of one or more sets of binders. 



Name _ 
Address 
City 



State 



ZIP 



My check in the amount of . 

Charge to: , VISA l 1 



MasterCard 



is enclosed, (In order to hold down costs, we do not bill) 
American Express J 



Account Number 
Signature 



Expiration Date 



Mail to: Falsoft, Inc., The Falsoft Building, Prospect, KY 40059. To order by phone, call: (502) 228-4492 




». 



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• « 



Electronic Audio Recognition System 




EARS 



Electronic 
Audio 
Recognition 
System 



$99.95 



• SPEECH 
RECOGNITION 

• HANDS OFF 
PROGRAMMING 

•HIGH 
QUALITY 
SPEECH 
REPRODUCTION 

EARS Does It All! 



tt*C 



ftto 



\tttf- 




Two Years In the Making. Speech Systems 
was formed to develop new and innova- 
tive speech products. After 2 years of in- 
tensive Research and Development, we 
have created a truely sophisticated 
speech recognition device, Recognition 
rates from 95% to 98% are typical. Until 
now, such a product was outside the 
price range of the personnel computer 
market, and even small businesses. 

EARS is trained by your voice and capable 
of recognizing any word or phrase. 
Training EARS to your particular voice 
print takes seconds* Up to 64 voice prints 
may be loaded into memory, You may 
then save on tape or disk as many as you 
like so that your total vocabulary is virtu- 
ally infinite, 

Speech and Sound Recognition. EARS is re* 
ally a sound recognition system, so it re- 
ally doesn't matter whether you speak in 
English, Spanish, or French . In fact you do 
not have to speak at all, you can train 
EARS to understand sounds such as a 
musical note or a door slamming. 

Hands Off Programming, Imagine writing 
your own BASIC programs without ever 
touching the keyboard. Everything that 



fftEE 
BLANK DISK 

OR TAPF 

WITH EVf RV 

^-jr ■ ORDER ^> 



you would normally do through a 
keyboard can now be done by just 
speaking. 

Programming EARS Is Easy. LISTEN, 
MATCH and other commands have been 
added to BASIC so that programming 
EARS is a piece of cake! The single BASIC 
line: 10 LISTEN: MATCH wiil instruct 
EARS to listen to you and return the 
matching phrase. 

It Talks. EARS is also capable of high qual- 
ity speech. We mean REALLY high quality. 
The speech is a fixed vocabulary spoken 
by a professional announcer. Speech 
Systems is currently creating a library of 
thousands of high quality words and 
phrases. For a demonstration call (312) 
879-6844, you won't believe your ears or 
our EARS. 

DISK OWNERS, EARS will work with any 
disk system with either a MULT1-PAK or 
Y-CABLE, Our new Triple Y-CABLE was 
specifically developed for those wishing 
to add SUPER VOICE as a third device. 

You Get Everything You Need, You get ev- 
erything you need including a specially 
designed professional headset style noise 



cancelling microphone. The manual is 
easy to use and understand. Several 
demonstration examples are included so 
you don't have to wrtte your own pro- 
grams unless you want to, EARS will work 
in any 32K or 64K Color Computer. 

SUPER VOICE $20 OFF 

Imagine talking to your computer and it 
talking back to you. When you need an 
unlimited vocabulary, you can't beat 
SUPER VOICE. For a limited time, we will 
give you the SUPER VOICE for $59.95 with 
your EARS purchase. Even if you already 
have another speech unit, here is your 
chance to buy the best and save $20. 

VOICE CONTROL 

Applications lor EARS are astounding, 
Here is our first of many listening pro- 
grams to come. VOICE CONTROL is a 
program specifically designed to allow 
you to control any appliance in your 
house with your voice and our HOME 
COMMANDER (sold separately). For 
example, you can control your TV by 
saying "TV ON" or TV OFF". $24.95 






W#W 



Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



9} jJWj Speech J^)tf stems 

/*' 38W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders, 

Shipping and handling US and Canada ><*+; n , „ $3.00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada $5.00 

COD charge , ............. . $2.00 

Illinois residents add bv*% sales tax 



BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (VOICE) 
1 <SS£Ef (312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OF BBS. 



'TALKING SOFTWARE' 

FOR THE VOICE, SUPER VOICE ™, RS SPEECH & SOUND PAKl 



RADIO SHACK® 
SPEECH & SOUND TRANSLATOR 

We believe that no COCO speech 
synthesizer gives you the power 
and flexibility of the SUPER 
VOICE. Nevertheless, some have 
decided to go with the Radio 
Shack SPEECH & SOUND PAK. 
For those we've decided to open 
our TALKING LIBRARY by offer 
ing the SPEECH & SOUND 
TRANSLATOR . Just load this pro- 
gram and our entire library is open to you. 

But that's not all, this program adds features. You get increas- 
ed intelligibility, the power of an exception table to specify 
specific pronunciations, $12,81 is spoken in dollars and cents, 
1,234,567 is spoken fn millions, thousands, and hundreds, and 
much more. $24.95 




TERMTALK All the features of an intelligent telecom- 
munications program plus what appears on the TV is spoken. 

• Upload and Download programs • Control Xmit Protocols 

• FuU or Split Screen • Buffer Editing 

• Normal or Reverse Video * It talks 

Please specify version (VOICE or RS SPEECH & SOUND PAK) 
Tape $39.95 Disk $49.95 

TALKING BINGO BINGO was never like this. The VOICE or 
SUPER VOICE makes all the calis while you sit back and play. 
Comes with 20 playing cards and 200 markers. High Resold 
tion graphic screen, 3 timing level, ball count and pause con- 
trol. $24.95 

ESTHER the talking psychoanalyst. An excellent example of 
artificial Intelligence. She may not solve all your problems, but 
her Insight will amaze you. Just like the original Eliza. 524.95 

SCORE E-Z A yahtzee type game. Up to six can play. $24.95 



CULT OF THE CAVE BEAR You're a stranded time 
traveler 50,000 years in the past. Can you fix your time 
machine while still surviving in this alien environ, and make it 
back? 529.95 

SHIP HUNT Play Battleship with your CoCo, All status 
reports are spoken. Ready battery, aim, fire at will! $24.95 

FINAL COUNTDOWN You must stop the mad general 
from launching a missile at Moscow and causing WW III. Has 
multiple voices for added reaiism. $24.95 



=ADVENTURES= 



STAR TALK You're the 
mission, ..destroy the enemies' 
reports are spoken! 



Star Fleet Captain. Your 

Dragon Star Ships. All status 

S24.95 



ADVENTURE GENERATOR Create talking adventure 
games that are 100% Machine Language, Up to 99 rooms, 255 
objects, 70 command words and 255 conditional flags. 

64K Disk $39.95 



EDUCATION 




ANIMATED SENTENCES The child builds complete sentences from 
a graphic menu using keyboard or joystick. The action is then spoken and 
acted out graphically. It's a great way to learn the parts of speech (ie. verb, 
subject, noun, etc) $24.95 



PRE-SCHOOL 

TALKING COUNT TO ONE HUNDRED 

A program designed to teach the child 
counting to 100 by 1 t 2, 5, and 10 for- 
wards and backwards. $29.95 
TALKING ALPHABET A program 
designed to help the pre-schooler 
master the alphabet. $29.95 
TALKING NUMBERS & COLORS A 
must program for the very young. High 
Resolution graphics to insure atten- 
tion and concentration. $29.95 
TALKING NUMBER SKILLS The child 
becomes familiar with the shape and 
meaning of numbers. $29.95 
TALKING CLOCK In these days of the 
digital clock, children miss an impor- 
tant education. This program aids the 
student in mastering the traditional 
analog clock. High Resolution 
graphics, $29.95 
AU software, 



GRADES 2- 6 




TALKING SUBTRACTION A program 
specifically designed to help the stu- 
dent learn subtraction. $29,95 
KING AUTHOR'S TALES A creative 
writing tool to allow a child to write 
compositions, or short stories, Q & A 
option is also included. $29.95 
COLOR MATH Addition, Subtraction, 
Multiplication, and Division are 
mastered. Student may specify dif- 
ficulty leveL $24*95 
SPELL ATRON Student builds a dic- 
tionary of words to be quizzed on. 
Perfect for Spelling B. $24.95 
SPELLING TESTER A graphic spelling 
game. The student is shown objects to 
be spelled. $9.95 
POETRY CREATOR The VOICE 
speech unit is used to speak poetry 
that is created. $9.95 
except as noted \ shipped on tape but may be 



SHORT STORY MAKER A program to 
create and speak stories created by 
the child. $9.95 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE Learn a foreign 
language, French dictionary is includ- 
ed. $995 
PRESIDENTS The student is able to 
master the Presidents of the US. $9.95 
STATES A program designed to aid 
the student in learning correct spelling 
of the states. $9.95 
CAPITALS Learning the State's 
Capitals is made more interesting us- 
ing speech. $9.95 
HANGMAN A word guessing game 
You must guess the word before you 
hang. $9.95 
MATH DRILL A program to help teach 
arithmetic $9.95 

moved to of/'sk. 



'HOME COMMANDER' 



The HOME COMMANDER easily connects to the 
cassette port of your Color Computer and lets you 
control appliances in your home. 

NO WIRES NECESSARY 

The HOME COMMANDER uses your home's 
existing electrical wiring to control virtually any- 
thing. Appliances are controlled via small control 
modules available at your local SEARS or Radio 
Shack store. 

ON FRIDAY 7:42 PM, OFF 
SUNDAY 1:26 AM 

Included FREE is a program to allow you to control 
up to 2=56 devices and specify the time and date 
they are to be activated. That's right, the software 
has its own built in accurate clock. 




$59.95 




Imagine controlling a light or TV with your voice. 
When used with our Electronic Audio Recognition 
System, EARS, you can literally control any 
appliance, 

PLUC'N POWER USERS 

If you were disappointed in the software that 
came with the Radio Shack PLUG'N POWER unit, 
and you probably were, we'll offer you our pow- 
erful software separately. An early version is de- 
scribed in the Feb., April, June, and August 1983 
issues of RAINBOW. Our current version is even 

better. .<>,♦.< ^ . . . . . . $1 9,95 

PLLJG'N POWER Is a trademark of Radio Shack* 



— INCLUDES OS9 DRIVER — 




PRECISION TIME MODULE $59.95 

Now your computer will always know the correct 
time and date. This amazing precision time mod- 
ule Is calibrated to the National Bureau of Stan- 
dards |WWV) atomic clock and you should never 
have to change it. 

Use the PRECISION TIME MODULE to add the 
time element to your games or use on BBS. If you 
like, purchase separately our BBS. 
COLORAMA BBS (64 K, 1 drive minimum) $99,95 

BATTERY BACKUP 

Even when your computer is off, the clock 
keeps correct time by operating using the 
internal battery backup system. 





■as** . 

****** 



MONTHS, LEAP YEARS & DST 

The PRECISON TIME MODULE automatically 
adjusts for the different number of days in 
each month as well as ]eap years. And believe 
it or not, it adjusts for DST so you don't have to 
remember if it's SPRENC FORWARD or FALL 
FORWARD. 



Y-CABLE $28.95 

Why pay $100 to $200 for a multl-pak. With 
the Y CABLE, you can connect your disk 
system to your computer along with either 
our STEREO PAK music synthesizer, our 
VOICE, SUPER VOICE speech synthesizers, 
or our PRECISION TIME MODULE. All con^ 
nectors gofd plated. 



TRIPLE Y $34.95 

We developed the Triple Y-Cable specifically 
for those interested in both speech synthesis 
and speech recognition. The Triple Y-Cable 
lets you connect EARS and SUPER VOICE to 
your color computer along with your disk 
system. 




A Need an _„ - 

^ ATTENTION EXPERIMENTERS! «*" $2900 

Interested in building your own project? Disks. ,.. {any quantity) 11:49 

Our oversized board gives plenty of room Tape t-TO, G-20 , $0.69 

for construction while the sturdy aluminum Advanced Hard Tape Box $0.29 

case with black satin finish assures protec- ^^^ 6821 $2 95 

lion and a professional appearance. ssi-263 74 LSI 38 $0,79 

Prototype Board only $19,95 $34 95 7407 - ■ ■ $079 

Prototype Enclosure only $19,95 IC sockets 14, 16, 22 pin .,,,.,., $0.29 

Buy both for $29,95 'C sockets 24, 28, 40 $0.39 




V^C 




V^* BLANK DISK 

^ OR TAPE 

>* WrTH fVFRY 

^ OROER ^ 



VISA* 



W T '^( 


lMQ«!»rCardj 





Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



#- 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders 

Shipping and handling US and Canada _„ „ S3. 00 

Shipping and handling outside the US and Canada T S5.00 

COO charge ...... .". $2,00 

Illinois residents add 6tt% sales tax 



y em6 



Speech *3mj/i 

38 W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 
(312) 879-6880 (VOICE) 
cS7 A E <312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OF BBS. 



ft a MUSIC THEORY -a fl 

Speech Systems is dedicated to bringing you the finest in music products. We are now proud to introduce MUSIC THEORY 
Courses 1 and 2, Each supports: drill and practice sessions, a scorecard to measure your progress, graphics and sound output 
for complete illustration of the concepts being introduced, and a reviewing session. Each course is a collection of programs 
emphasizing a particular subject area. 



COURSE 1 

This course covers all ihe basics from music notation & 
duration, key signatures, tempo, to an introduction of the 
keyboard. This is an entry level course recommended as a 
prerequisite for Course 2, 
32K Disk only ...... .,,..... . .$29,95 



COURSE 2 

A more advanced course that deals with: Major and Har- 
monic Minor scales, interval spelling, Triad (Chord) theory, 
Inversions, Dominant 7th chords, and ear training of the 
intervals. 

32K Disk only .*,*■, . „> $49:95 



*« 



& 



MUSICA 2 




& $29.95 

?* vU Tape or Disk 



When in stereo mode, music is played 
through our STEREO PAK (purchased 
separately). 



Now shipping 

Version 2.6 

Previous users call 

for update info 





• Loudness of each voice may be 
individually specified. 

• Memory available is constantly 
displayed. 

• Voice waveshapes may be 
exchanged between voices at 
any point. 

• Tempo may be specified and 
may even be altered as the 
music plays. 

• Flats and sharps supported. 

• Billions of timbre 
combinations- 

• High resolution graphic 
display, looks just like sheet 
music. 

• MUSICA 2 is 1 00% software, no need for 
hardware unless you want music 
produced in STEREO. In that case, the 
STEREO PAK may be purchased 
separately. It's a must for the 
audiophile] 

• Durations include: whole, half, 
quarter, eighth, sixteenth, thirty 
second, sixty-fourth, and triplet, 

• 30 page manual describes all. 
» Requires minimum of 32K. 



m u : i c h ii i . - 

1 9:97445Q<U 2 7598750QQ0 
3 3:95577000 i 9:93H32fl| 



= MEHQF'Y 



jJj 






Jj 



±1 



5 




ftforfr 



Repeat bars allow repeating of music without 
re-Inserting music a second or third time. 




* Voice timbre (waveshape) may 
be altered by specifying 
harmonic content just like 
stops on an organ. 

* During editing, voice being 
inserted is displayed. 

■ Each measure is numbered for 
easy reading of music. 

* Measure bars aid in reading 
and developing music. 

» Each voice may be visually 
highlighted for easy 
identification. 

■ 4 Voices produced 
simultaneously. 

■ Input notes from keyboard or 
joystick. 

• Play music from your own BASIC 
program. 

• Block copy music for easy music 
development. 

• 100% machine language so it is lightning 
fast. 

• Vibrato effect easily produced- 

• With STEREO PAK, voices may be 
switched between left and right 
speakers as music plays. 



Output music to your printer (Gemini 10X, 
Epson, R.S, printers, Okidata). 



i** STEREO PAK™ $39.95 



Plug this gem into your computer, connect to your nome 
stereo system and sit back and enjoy music realism. The 
STEREO PAK is a hardware music synthesizer that plays our 
MUSIC LIBRARY and MUSICA 2 music in stereo. Because it 
was designed specifically with music reproduction in mind r 
the sound is superb. The highs are crisp and clear while the 
bass notes will rattle your walls. 

The STEREO PAK is all hardware. It rs intended as an 
enhancement for MUSICA 2 and our MUSIC LI BRARY. Disk 
owners may use the STEREO PAK with the R,S, Multi-Pak or 
our Y-CABLE ($28.95) 







^ MUSIC LIBRARY™ — 3 VOLUMES 



You get over 100 four voice songs with a combined 
playing time of 3 hours. That's right, 3 hours of music. You 
won't belive your CoCo could sound so good. To fit over 
1 00 songs required both sides of 5 C-20 tapes and the disk 
version uses 5 full disks (that's a half box of disks). 

A JUKE BOX selection program is included to allow you to 
select specific songs or automatically play each. These 
songs are ready to go, you don't need MUSICA 2 or a 
knowledge of music. 

These MDngs were developed usingthe best music program 
available for the CoCo; MUS I CA 2 . The tunes may be used 
as source files for MUSICA 2 and changed by the user. 
When coupled with the STEREO PAK the songs are 
reproduced in stereo with unsurpassed realism. 



i 



MUSIC LIBRARY 100 categories: 

Stage, Screen, and TV Classical 
Music of the 70's 
Music of the 60's 
Music of the 5G's 
Old Time Favorites 



10 hours | 




Christmas (popular) 
Christmas (traditional) 
Patriotic 
Polka Party 



/V W; 



MUSIC LIBRARY 200 

Our second volume of 100 tunes 3% hours of music. 

MUSIC LIBRARY 300 

Our third volume of 100 tunes, 3 more hours of music. 

MUSIC LIBRARY (Each Volume) . . (32 K Tape) , . . $34,95 
(Specify 100, 200, or 300) (32 K Disk) „.. $39.95 



SPEECH SYSTEMS 
DATAPEN $29.95 

Two programs are provided 
free with each DATAPEN. 
SKETCH is a superb high reso- 
lution color drawing program 
allowing precise drawing and 
freehand sketching, painting 
and much more. SHAPE 
CREATE is a high resolution 
library shape drawing program. 
You can even save your work 
to tape or disk for later display 
or editing. 

The software is shipped on 
tape and may easily be moved 
to disk. Included is complete 
documentation to allow you 
to integrate the DATAPEN into 
your own BASIC program, 
Requires 32K. 




EASY TO 
USE! 



EDUCATIONAL 
SOFTWARE 

An easy and tun way for kids to 
enter answers. 

Vol 1 — grades 1, 2, and special 
education, 

Includes these five programs: 

• Basic Addition 

• Basic Multiplication 

• Match the Shapes 

• Match the Numbers 
■ Rhyme the Words 
32Kdisk $29.95 

VoL 2 — grades 3 to 6 and 
special education 
Includes these five programs; 

• Men of Science 

• Mixed Math 

• World Capitals 

• Computer Terms 

• 20th Century Events 
32K disk ,,,.,.. $29.95 




WW 



MoAtarConj 



Dealer Inquiries 
Invited 



'/A 



Speech ^3mj/ 



9- 



etnd 



We accept CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA and MASTER CARD orders. 

Shipping and handling US and Canada . , , + , $3 00 

Shipping and handiing outside the US and Canada S 5.00 

COD charge 52 00 

Illinois residents add 6tt% sales tax 



38 W 255 DEERPATH ROAD 

BATAVIA, ILLINOIS 60510 

(312) 879-6880 (VOICE) 

'coto^A (312) 879-6811 (24 HR. BBS) 

CALL ANY DAY TO ORDER. ALSO ORDER BY MAIL OF BBS. 



SOFTMART 

JUNE SALES 

SALE PRICES GOOD UNTIL JUNE 26. 
hardware WE PROUDLY PRESENT THE FOLLOWING 

NEW PRODUCTS 

DISTRIBUTED BY SOFTMART 

RAM DISK DRIVER FOR DSL 1 28K BOARD 

Allows use of your EXTRA 64K of RAM as a SUPER 
FAST DISK DRIVE, 



BOTEK PARALLEL INTERFACE — SAVE 15.00 IF ORDERED 

WITH ANY PRINTERS ■ .v.v.iw,...,..,.,.., ,, , . . . 69-95 

WD£Q PLUS ♦ » « * .... w -.......,...».. ■ •*. -*- - ■ ££.-45 

HJL S 7 PROFESSIONAL .,.,,., ..,.,. 79- 95 

J&M DISK CONTROLLER . , . . , . ... T r .. t h ._., H .__....... . 1 1 BOO 

(WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) 

MK UPGRADE: K<T ...... i .>.. .^ ............ i 35. 95 

SPECTRUM UQHT PEW . . * 7, 95 

PHELAN SWITCH BOX , * .>, H .,,.>.,.,.,..,....,... . 39. 95 

(FOR CONNECTING PRfNTER AND MODEM 
AT THE SAME TIME/DATA TRANSFER LlGHTJ 
PHELAN 10 FT. EXT. CORD FOR PRINTER: 

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DUCATION OVERVIEW 



New Trends In 
Educational Computing 



By Michael Plog, Ph.D. 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



Back in April 1982, the Tandy 
Corporation began a program 
called "Tandy Educational 
Grants/" The company provides sums 
of money to educational institutions for 
research and development of education- 
al uses of computers, Since its beginning, 
the Tandy Educational Grants program 
has awarded over $885,000 worth of 
hardware and software. 

The current "cycle 1 * of awards was 
made for proposals based on "Using 
Microcomputers to Develop Thinking 
Skills/* Tandy, of course, has several 
models of computers in its product line. 
Four awards were given during the 
current cycle; one involved the Color 
Computer, 

This award went to Mrs. Margaret 
Perry of Safety Harbor Middle School, 
Safety Harbor, Fla. Her project is to 
establish a model program using com- 
puters to aid gifted students in improving 
their thinking and creative skills, Mrs. 

(Michael Plog received his Ph. D. degree 
from l he University of Illinois. He has 
taught social studies in high school 
worked in a central office of a school 
district, and currently is employed at 
the Illinois State Board of Education J 



Perry (and the Safety Harbor school 
system) received II 64 K Color Com- 
puters with monitors and disk drives, 
a DMP-1 10 printer, color graphics 
printer, touch pad and several software 
packages. (Does that sound like a 
dream come true?) 

At present, we do not know exactly 
how the hardware and software will be 
used, or what the curriculum will look 
like. In the future, we hope to be able 
to report on the results of this project. 
The materials and procedures developed 
in Safety Harbor might be worthwhile 
to adapt to your local school system. 

Possibly, curriculum materials may 
be developed that you can use at home. 
Whatever the outcome of the Safety 
Harbor experience, you should be 
aware that the Tandy Corporation is 
taking education seriously, and even 
providing funds for innovative programs 
in schools. 

If you are interested in preparing a 
proposal of your own, write to Tandy 
Educational Grants Program, Radio 
Shack Education Division. 1400 One 
Tandy Center, Forth Worth, TX 76102. 
The educational community needs to 
experiment with different uses of 
computers, and we need quality products 



and procedures to use in schools, Since 
schools are often short of money, 
outside sources of funds are important 
to continue development of curriculum 
to benefit all students in the country. 

Even with the reduction of funds for 
education from the federal government, 
there are still some programs which help 
development of educational experiences, 
The National Diffusion Network is one 
such program. This program provides 
funds for innovative programs, then 
goes the next step. Funds are also 
provided to help school systems imple- 
ment the projects that have been judged 
successful. Several Diffusion projects in 
past years have dealt with computers 
in the classroom. 

One of the most recent such projects 
is the Asbury Park Computer Math 
Program. The goal of this project is to 
integrate computers into the entire 
curriculum of grades 9-12, with 18 
hours of instruction in each of six 
subject areas: general mathematics, 
algebra 1 and II, geometry, trigonometry 
and calculus. The emphasis of this 
project is on mathematics, but other 
projects have stressed different aspects 
of the educational arena. You can find 
out what National Diffusion Network 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 55 



projects exist by contacting the admin- 
istration of your local school district. 

Another sign of federal involvement 
in computers for schools is from the 
National Institute of Education (NIE). 
This organization has set as one of its 
priorities for 1986 an investigation into 
the effective uses of education software 
and technology. We hope NIE officials 
are aware of projects similar to the one 
in Safety Harbor. The report from NIE 
should be completed in 1986, but 
interim reports may be released earlier. 

One study NIE will probably examine 
has been conducted by the Office of 
Bilingual Education and Minority 
Languages Affairs (of the Department 
of Education). The Office recently 
released a report on the use of educa- 
tional technologies in programs dealing 
with limited English-proficient students. 
The study was limited to students with 
a native language other than English, 

Computer assistance has long been 
thought to be helpful for such students, 
because some students may be in school 
districts where no one else (teacher, 
aide, principal) speaks the same lan- 
guage as the student. Computer assisted 
instruction could help such students 



learn English, as well as basic skills in 
their native language. The study con- 
ducted by the Office has several findings. 
Many of the findings apply to all 
students, not just those with limited 
English proficiency. 

As might be expected, funding for 
computer assisted instruction in- 
creased from 1982 to 1984, while 
funding for audio-visual technologies 

"As the nation moves from 
an industrial to on 
information economy, 
schools must ensure that all 
children have access to 
computers." 

decreased. This is not to imply that 
schools dealing with limited English 
proficient (LEP) students are no longer 
interested in audio-visual technology. 
Many schools have already purchased 
this type of equipment, and have no 
need for more equipment. In a few 
years, we will probably see less money 
spent for hardware and more resources 
used for software- 



The study also found that educational 
technologies can increase the effective- 
ness of instruction for LEP students. 
In addition, the study concluded that 
computer assisted instruction holds a 
greater educational potential than other 
technologies, such as audio-visual 
techniques. 

The study also pointed out some 
concerns for users of computers in the 
classroom. One finding relates to staff 
dealing with computer assisted instruc- 
tion. A lack of planning and staff 
training have compromised the effec- 
tiveness of many CA1 programs. As 
with any educational program, poor 
staff preparation and poor planning will 
result in a "hit or miss" outcome. 

Positive results are due more to 
chance than conscious effort. And, 
many educational computer programs 
depend on one key person; without that 
person (the study founder), the project 
would most likely fail. Again, as with 
any program, a single individual has 
difficulty institutionalizing a set of 
educational experiences. 

Two other findings are important 
from this study, and should be 



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56 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



recognized by anyone trying to imple- 
ment computers in schools. The people 
initiating the computer assisted instruc- 
tion program often had objectives that 
were not specific enough for success. 
We all know people who are so enam- 
ored with the equipment that they do 
not realize its use. 

Finally, the study found what most 
educators have been saying: A lack of 
instruction ally and technically sound 
software has reduced the effectiveness 
of CAI for limited English -proficient 
students. Naturally, the lack of good 
software is not limited to students with 
a native language other than English. 

This study, while limited in scope and 
intent, is worthy of study by people 
interested in computer assisted instruc- 
tion. While computer assisted instruc- 
tion is only one component of computer 
use in schools, it is an important 
component. 

The federal government may even 
take a more active role in computer 
education, if Representative Timothy 
Wirth, a Democrat from Colorado, gets 
his way. Congressman Wirth will 
introduce a computer literacy bill in the 
House of Representatives this yeai\ The 



purpose of his bill is to help schools 
buy microcomputers, train teachers, 
establish a federal information bank 
and create a computer consulting 
service. The proposed legislation covers 
a broad area of assistance to educational 
computing. 

Last year, Congressman Wirth intro- 
duced a similar bill, but it was not 
passed. He is trying again. Wirth is 
interested in equity of access. As the 
nation moves from an industrial to an 
information economy, Wirth claims, 
schools must ensure that ail children 
— regardless of wealth — have access 
to computers, 

T^he issue of equity of access of 
A computers is a priority topic for 
many people. A coalition of Washington 
computer educators has established 
SLICE (Support for Leadership in 
Computer Education). This group is 
organizing in-service training for local 
computer instructors with emphasis on 
equity. This group is working without 
any government funds,' but has a 
localized area of interest and effect. 

Some efforts for computer literacy 
are state oriented. After this summer 



vacation, all schools in Texas will have 
to begin teaching seventh and eighth 
graders computer literacy according to 
standard, state-mandated curriculum. 
Other states are implementing computer 
literacy programs, but none that ! know 
of has a state-mandated curriculum. 

The column this month has been a 
collection of news items, notices of 
happenings and events. If you learn of 
an event that could benefit other people 
interested in educational computing, 
please pass it along to me and I will 
insert it in the column. Please mail 
notices to me at 829 Evergreen, Cha- 
tham, 1L 62629. 

Before ending the column for this 
month, there is one other piece of news 
it is my personal privilege to share with 
you. My wife and I were honored with 
the birth of a daughter. As this is being 
written, my baby girl is Less than one 
week old. She even helped me write part 
of the article, lying in my lap, with little 
fingers reaching for the keyboard. 

She does not have her own Color 
Computer yet, but that will just be a 
matter of time. She is beautiful, and 
I even forgave the nurse in the hospital, 
who thought I was the grandfather. ^ 




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June 1965 THE RAINBOW 57 



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Ease the unwieldy task of writing animated graphics 



Animatic 

Automatic 
Animation 



By Rita Sabo 



Automatic animation {Animatic) is a set of graphics 
animation subroutines that can be called from BASIC or 
Assembler. With Animatic, the cumbersome process of 
writing animated graphics is minimized. In addition, when written 
in Assembler, Animatic will provide smoother and faster 
animation. 

Animatic takes advantage of the fact that most animation 
programs follow roughly the same logic (save previous screen 
contents, get object from old position, put object in new position, 
etc.) and it automatically performs many of these steps. . 

To access Animatic from BASIC, you will make use of a "new" 
function called ANIM. The syntax for ANIM is: 

X = RNIM(P0,P1, ...P7) 

'X' is a numeric variable, and P0-P7 are the parameters 
described in Table I. The variable 'Y' will contain return codes 
and status information relevant to the selected function. 

Depending on the selected function (value of PO), you may 
not need to specify all of the parameters. Zero is assumed when 
a parameter value is omitted: V = RNIM(P0, ,P2), but if you omit 
coding double-commas, then the last used value for the missing 
parameter is used. Example: v = RNIM(P0,P1,,P3) is the same 
as V = RNIN(P0,Pi,0,P3), and V = RNIM(P0,Pi) will use the 
last used values for P2 . . . P7 (if applicable to the function 
indicated by PO). 



(Rita Sabo holds a degree in literature. She enjoys reading the classics and 

working with the CoCo.) 



June 1885 THE RAINBOW 59 



To access Animatic from an As- 
sembler program, you must first obtain 
the address of the Parameter Area by 
doing JSR INFO. There you should do 
a JSR ANIM with the proper parame- 
ters in this area. Upon exit, ANIM will 
set the *D T register with the relevant 
operation status. 

Description of Functions 

Following find the description for 
each of the functions shown in Table 
I. For an example of a program using 
these functions, refer to program 
listings I and 2. Compare program 
Listing I with the "do-it-yourself #%* 
r program of Radio Shack's Going 
Ahead with Extended BASIC. 



DEFINE (P0=0) 

It must be the first used ANIM 
function. It defines in PI the maximum 
number of figures (a.k,a t objects) to be 
created in your program. 

CREATE (P0=1) 

A CREATE is required for each of 
the figures to be moved in your 
program. The figure will behave accord- 
ing to the values of P2 and P7. 

You don't have to specify anything 
in PL A sequential number (starting 
with 1) is assigned to each object as 
it is being created. Any further reference 
to this object will use this "object I D " 
instead of the traditional XY 
coordinates. 

If P2 equals zero, the object will be 
placed on the screen exactly as it was 
created. If P2 is not zero, the object 
will be MIXed with the screen back- 
ground. MIX is similar to the QR 
function for PMDDEs 0, 2 and 4. See 
pictures 1 and 2 for a description of 
MIX effects in several PMODEs. 



P3 and P4 indicate the XY coordi- 
nates of the object's upper-left corner. 
P5 and P6 indicate the width and height 
of the figure. P5 and P6 should not 
exceed 100* 

P7 represents the action to be taken 
in the event that this object is moved 
to an XY position unfit for the size of 
the object. (For example: attempting to 
move an object 20 pixels wide to 
positions X=244, Y=14.) This condition 
will, from now on, be referred to as 
"overflow," With P7 = 0, Animatic will 
signal an error in overflow. 

When P7 = I, the object will be 
"frozen" on the nearest possible position 
on the border of the screen. In our 
example: X=235, Y=14, 

If P7 - 2 the object would disappear 
in overflow. You can make it reappear 
by moving it to a legal position. 

With P7 = 3, the object will "wrap- 
around," henceforth appearing on the 
extreme side of the screen fin our 
example: X=0,Y= 14). 

Regardless of the P7 selection, you 
will receive notice of overflows through 
the status of the operation. 

MOVE (P0=2) 

In PI, specify the number of the 
object to be moved, P2 represents the 
criteria for obtaining the new XY 
coordinates. 

P2-0: The object will move to the 
absolute X-Y values specified in P3 and 
P4. 

P2=l: The movement will be relative 
to the actual position. The P3 and P4 
values will be added to the actual XY 
coordinates to obtain the destination. 
P3 and P4 can be negative. 

P2=2: The object will move to the 
absolute XY coordinates pointed out 
by the left joystick. Because the joystick 
readings cover a 0-63 range, the 'X' 



reading is multiplied by four and the 
'Y 1 reading by three. 

P2=3: Same as in P2=2, but using 
the right joystick. 

P3=4: The object has a relative 
movement with the displacements 
calculated from the left joystick readings. 

The 'X* and % Y* coordinates are 
calculated as follows: 

x=xe«+( (XJ-32)*P3KB 
Y=Y0+( [VJ-32)*P4)^B 

Where XO and YO = actual 
coordinates. 

XJ and YJ = X-Y joystick readings. 

P3 and P4 = Values given for pa- 
rameters 3 and 4. These values can be 
negative. However, the ANIM instruc- 
tion will only accept negative values 
in Hex form, i.e., specify &HFF instead 
of-1. 

Using this option, you can move the 
object with the direction and acceler- 
ation represented by the position of the 
joystick (i.e., P3 = 3 will give the effect 
of greater accelerations than P3 = 2). 

P2=5: Same as in P2=4, but using 
the right joystick. 

P2=6: Animatic will select XY values 
at random. P3 and P4 represent the 
maximum random value for 6 X* and l Y. r 
P5 and P6 will be added to the 
generated L X' and 'Y' values, respectively. 

If you specify P3 and P4 = 0, 
Animatic will use P3=255; P4=191; 
P5=0; P6=0 as a default. 

The random sequence has a period 
of 256, but Animatic reseeds itself once 
the period is exhausted by taking the 
timer value as a seed number. If you 
are calling Animatic from ML, write 
an interrupt routine to modify storage 
addresses SI 12-S1 13 accordingly. 

P3-7: Keyboard controlled movement 
can be obtained by selecting this option. 




Picture I: MIX option m PMDDEs 0, 
2 and 4. Top using PUT (with and 
without DR). Bottom using Animatic. 



PUT PUT OB 

no p/=e 

'MIX MIXED 



Picture 2: MIX option in PMDDEs I 
and 3. Top using PUT. Bottom using 
Animath with several MIX color 
combinations. 



60 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



The left/ right arrows will generate a 
relative movement from the value in P4 
and the up/ down arrows from P5. The 
values in P4 and P5 should be positive 
since Animatk already knows the left/ 
up arrows represent a negative 
displacement. 

P2>7: Selecting P2 with a value 
greater than seven will redisplay the 
object in the current X-Y location. 

P3-P6 as discussed above have 
different meanings depending on the 
value of P2. 

P7 is used only if the object was 
CREATEd with MIX, P7 indicates the 
color to be omitted when the object is 
being mixed with the screen. P7-0 
removes buff/ green, P7=l removes 
cyan/ yellow, P7-2 magenta/ blue, and 
P7=3 orange/ red. Refer to Picture 2 for 
results with different P7 values. 

As a result of the MOVE function, 
the variable at the left of the ANIM 
instruction will be set as follows; 

= No screen overflow 

1 = Upper screen overflow 

2 = Bottom screen overflow 



4 = Left overflow 

5 = Upper left corner 

6 = Bottom left corner 

g - Right screen overflow 
9 = Upper right corner 
10 = Bottom right corner 

ML programs can get these values 
from L B" register, 

PLACE (P0=4) 

Unlike MOVE, PLACE does not 
assume that the object being moved is 
already on the screen- PLACE is more 
like PUT as it limits itself to copying 
object from storage onto the screen. The 
options for PLACE are exactly the 
same as these of MOVE. 

REMOVE (P0^4) 

With REMOVE, you simply "swap" 
the contents of the screen with the 
contents of storage. This function 
differs from MOVE (P2>7) in that the 
object in storage is displayed "as is," 
whereas MOVE performs internal pixel 
and mix adjustments. REMOVE is fast 
and it can be used to simulate blinking. 



The figure to be removed is specified 
inPl. 

COPY OBJECT (P0=5) 

Sometimes you may want to perform 
a "tricky" effect or simply substitute one 
object for another. COPY duplicates 
an object. COPY does not like it when 
the new object has not been CREATEd, 
and when the size of the new object 
is less than the size of the object being 
copied. Both the object being copied 
and the new object must have the same 
MIX or NO-MIX definition, 

In PI, specify the destination object, 
In P2, specify the object being copied. 

OPERATE (P0=6) 

Used to directly modify an object. In 
P2, specify the operation to be per- 
formed upon the object defined in PL 

P2=0: Clear the object to the value 
specified in P3, 

P2=I: Perform a logical "NOT" 
operation on the object. If in a two- 
color PMDDE, this will convert the object 
into its reverse colors. 

P2=2: Make an "AND" operation 



ANIMATIC 
TAfiL E#f 



r 

FUNCTION 


PO 


P1 


P2 


P3 


P4 


P5 


P6 


P7 


DEFINE 





tfRGS 


' 


■ 


■ 


- 


■ 


. 


CREATE 


! 


• 


0=NOMIX 


X COORD 


Y COORD 


ff COLS 


n ROWS 


(TERROR 


1= FREEZE 


00 MIX 


2-DISAPP. 










3-WRAP 


MOVE 
PLACE 


2 
3 


#FlG 


O^ABS. 


X 


Y 


- 


* 


IF TYPE 

MIX 
COLOR 
CODE 

{0-3} 


1=REL. 


+X 


+Y 


2=LJOYSK 


* 


■ 


3=RJOYSK 


■ 


\ 


4=LJOYSK 


w 


\m 


5=RJOYSK 


(X) 


m 


6-RANDOM 


- X 


; V 


-X 


+ Y 


7=KEYBRD 


*x 


+Y 


' 


r 


B-REDlSP 
SAMF 


AS 


MflUP 


REMOVE 


4 


ttFlG 












"-""■'**► 


COPY 


5 


TO FIG 


FROM FIG 


■ 


t 


• 


■ 


. 


OPERATE 


6 


#FIG 


0=CLEAR 


OPERATION 

BYTE 


■ 


■ 


■ 


* 


1=NOT 


2=AND 


3-Ofl 


DOMAIN 


7 


#FIG 





X - 


Y l 


- X 


I Y 




* FIG 


• 


■ 





INFO 


8 




B 





June 1985 THE RAINBOW 61 



against the value specified in P3. 

P3=3: Make an "OR" against the 
value in P3. 

For NO-MIX objects, the changes 
will immediately be represented on the 
screen, but for MIX objects the changes 
will not appear until the next time you 
move your object. 



CHECK DOMAIN (P0=7) 

With DOMAIN you can test if an 
object "touches" a specific screen area. 
This function is used in program Listing 
2 to check for asteroids crashing with 
the spaceship. 

Specify the object to be tested in PI. 
If P2 is not zero, this number will 
represent an object whose coordinates 
will be used to define the screen area. 
For example, to know if object 2 
"touches" object 5, code Pl=2, P2=5. 
If P2^0, then P3 through P6 define the 
X-Y cordinates of the area's corners. 
If the object touches a point within this 
square, a T value is returned. 

GENERAL INFO (P0=8) 

To call this function from ML 
programs, make a JSR INFO, The 
arguments should be given in registers 
'A'and'B.' 

With INFO you can obtain informa- 
tion about Animatic depending upon 
the PI and P2 values. "NZ" represents 
a value other than zero in the table 
below. 



P1P2 

=0=0 



-0NZ 



= 1N2 



Result 

Address of an internal pa- 
rameter table (required by 
ML programs). Also clears 
to zero the parameter table. 
XY coordinates for the NZ 
object. The result of the XY 
coordinates has the format 
&HXXYY. 

Address of internal Figure 
Definitions for object NZ. 
(Do not expect to use this 
function too often.) 



Error Messages 

Animatic returns error codes with the 
following format: 
"WW ERROR DN FIGURE YVY RCTION Z" 

YYY is the number of the object you 
were using when the error occurred and 
'Z' is the number of the attempted 
function. If in BASIC, you'll also get an 
?FC Error. When calling Animatic from 
Assembler, the error will be displayed 
and control returns to your program. 
You will be notified through a non-zero 
value in the fc A* register. (This does not 
apply for calls to INFO.) 

What about WW? Following find its 
meaning; 

XOS= Out of Screen. You selected 
P7=0 during function P0=1 for this 
object and have attempted to move the 
object to an overflow position. 

XOM= There is not enough memory 
to create the object. If possible, relocate 
Animatic to a lower address. The 
program in Listing 3 will help you to 
determine an appropiate offset for 
Animatic. 

XOF= You are trying to CREATE 
more objects than specified in DEFINE. 

XIO- Invalid option. The requested 
function does not exist (valid options 
are 0-8 for BASIC and 0-7 for ML 
programs). 

XEX= You are trying to CREATE 
an object more than 100 pixels wide 
or with a width of zero pixels. 

XEY= You are trying to CREATE 
an object more than 100 pixels high or 
with a height of zero. 

XNC= Object not created. The object 
you are trying to use has not been 
CREATEd. 

XNI= You forgot to DEFINE (P0=0) 
Animatic. 

XIC= Can't copy object. See descrip- 
tion for the COPY function and see if 
you are violating some of the 
restrictions. 

Some Things to Know 

Animatic takes about 2.5K of storage, 
plus the required storage to keep the 
objects. It is written in PIC code and 



works on any CoCo with at least 16K 
and Extended BASIC. Disk is not 
required. 

Although Animatic runs in 16K 
systems, you will need a 32K system 
and EDTASM+ to enter and assemble 
the program. RAINBOW ON TAPE is an 
excellent alternative. You may also send 
me a SASE with a formatted diskette 
plus $4 (U.S. currency). 

Listing 4 contains the source code. 
The program is so large that I do not 
recommend typing all the comments. 

Program 3 will estimate the required 
size for your figures, and it suggests a 
load address for Animatic. After 
assembling the code, make a CLEPR 
200, LORD RDDRESS-1. 

If using Animatic from BASIC, type 
in EXEC after loading it. Nothing should 
happen after typing EXEC and the cursor 
must continue blinking as normal At 
this point, BASIC already recognizes the 
ANIM instruction. Because of this new 
instruction, avoid the use of USR0 and 
U5R1 while in BASIC. 

For a start, you may try sample 
programs 1 and 2. If after running a 
BASIC-Animatic program and you get 
?SN Errors or you see T instead of 
ANIM when listing your program, this 
means you forgot to type EXEC after 
loading Animatic. 

With Animatic, I have tried to 
provide a lot of functions and an easy 
interface for animation purposes. 
However, when used in complex ani- 
mation environments, several consider- 
ations and restrictions inherent in its 
design have to be taken into account. 

The potential for combinations in the 
animation functions here provided is 
such that it would require a more 
lengthy article to describe all possible 
effects, restrictions and techniques. I do 
encourage you to experiment whenever 
you have doubts. Of course, I would 
like to hear from you if you have 
questions, comments or problems 
regarding Animatic. You may contact 
me at 20819 Via Valencia, Boca Raton, 
FL 33433. 



Listing 1: ROCKET 

10 'THIS PROGRAMS MOVES A ROCKET 
FROM LEFT TO RIBHT OF THE SGREE 


N 

20, 'PREPARE GRAPHICS 

CKET 

30 PCLEAR 4 

40 PMODE 4,1 


AND 


DRAW RO 



50 PCLS 

60 SCREEN 1,1 

70 X=10:Y*10 

80 DRAW "BM10,10; S2; H10;R15; F10 

;R20;F10;G10;L20;G10;L15;E10;U20 

; D4; NL8; D4; NL12; D4NL16; D4; NL12; D 

4;NL8" 

90 'DEFINE ANIMATIC. MAX 1 FIGUR 

E 



62 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



iSs*'^...--— ,___. 



100 A=ANIM(0,1) 

110 'CREATE FIGURE: NO MIX, FROM 

X=0 Y=0, X SIZE=35, Y SIZE=35, 
IF OUT OF SCREEN WRAP AROUND 
120 A=ANIM(l,,0,0,0,x*3.S,Y#3.5, 
3) 

130 A$=INKEY$: IF A*-"" THEN 130 
140 PCLS 

150 'MOVE FIGURE #1. RELATIVE MO 
VEMENT OF +5 IN X AND IN Y 
160 X=ANIM<2,1,1,5,0) 
170 GOTO 160 



^ 



Listing 2: PRDMNRDE 



170 77 

320 155 

500 177 

720 1 

END 210 



10 'SPACE PROMENADE WITH AN I MAT I 

C 

20 GOTO 420 

30 'DEFINE AN I MAT IC. #FIGS=D+SPA 

CESHIP+BOMB (D*#ASTERQIDS) 

40 A=ANIM(0,D+2) 

50 'CREATE SPACESHIP. NO MIX. PO 

SIT IONS X=0/Y=0, SI2E-35/20. IF 

OUT OF SCREEN FREEZE 

60 A=ANIM(1,,0,0,5,X*3.5,Y*2,1) 

70 'CREATE ASTEROIDS. NO MIX. FR 

QM POSITION 95,95. SIZE 11/11. I 

F OUT OF SCREEN WRAP-AROUND 

80 FOR 1=1 TO D 

90 A=ANIM(1, ,0,95,95,11,11,3) 
100 NEXT 

110 'CREATE BOMB. NO MIX. FROM P 
OSITION 200,184. SIZE-6 X 6. IF 
OUT OF SCREEN WRAP 
120 A»ANIM(1,,0,200,184,6,6,3) 
130 'PREPARE SCREEN'S BACKGROUND 
(PLANET + STARS) 

140 PCLS: CIRCLE (255, 191) ,10: PAIN 

T (250, 189) ,1,1 

150 FOR 1-1 TO 60:PSET(RND(255) , 

RND ( 191 ),1):NEXT: SCREEN 1,1 

160 ' SET ORIGINAL ASTEROIDS POS 

ITIONS. 

170 FOR 1=2 to D+1:S=INT(240/D)* 

(I-1):X=ANIM(2,1,0,S,0):NEXT 

180 'MAIN LOOP. MOVE SPACESHIP ( 

OBJECT#l). F2 CAN BE 4 IF JOYSTI 

CK OR 7 IF KEYBOARD. F3 AND F4 A 

RE X AND Y INCREMENTS 

190 R«ANIM(2,1,F2,F3,F4):G0SUB31 

0: 'GO TO CHECK FOR CRASH 

200 'MOVE ASTEROIDS. RELATIVE WI 

TH X AND Y INCREMENTS DEPENDING 



ON THE NUMBER OF THE OBJECT 

210 FOR 1=2 TO D+1:XA=ANIM(2,I,1 

,&HFE,8+I*2> :NEXT 

220 'MOVE BOMB. RANDOM X=RND(30) 

+150, Y=RND(151)+20 

230 RA=ANIM(2,D+2,6,30,151,150,2 

0) 

240 'CHECK FOR CRASH 

250 GOSUB 310 

260 'REMOVE BOMB TO PREVENT OVER 

LAPS WITH ASTEROIDS 

270 RA=ANIM(4,D+2) 

280 'IF R=10 THEN SPACESHIP RE AC 

HED BOTTOM/RIGHT CORNER 

290 IF RO10 THEN 190 ELSE 370 

300 'CHECK IF SPACESHIP IS IN SA 

ME DOMAIN THAT ANY OF THE ASTERO 

IDS OR BOMB 

310 FOR 1=2 TO D+2:XA=ANIM(7,I,1 

):IF XAO0 THEN GOTO 360 ELSE NE 

XT: RETURN 

320 'OPERATE THE CRASHING ASTERO 

ID BY CLEARING IT TO RED (TO SIM 

ULATE FIRING) 

330 A=ANIM(6,I,0,&HAA) 

340 'MAKE SOUNDS AND FLASH SCREE 

N 

350 'ALMOST ALL THE CODE FROM HE 

RE TO THE END IS COSMETIC 

360 FOR 1=1 TO 3:PLAY"T100;O1;F# 

C": SCREEN 1,0: FOR J=l TO20:NEXT: 

SCREEN 1, 1 : NEXT :W=0: GOTO 380 

370 FOR 1=1 TO 2:PLAY"T250CDEFG" 

: NEXT: PLAY "03; L4; C; L2; D; A" : W=B 

380 CLS ( W ) : PR I NTQ290 , " " ; : I NPUT " 

ANOTHER GAME (Y/N)";A* 

390 IF A*="N" THEN CLS: PRINT" I 'L 

L SEE YOU LATER": END 

400 FL«=l:GOTO 440 

410 INITIALIZE 

420 PCLEAR 4 

430 PMODE 4,1 

440 PCLS 

450 X=10:Y=10 

460 DRAW "BM10,10; S2;H10; R15s Fl 

0;R20;F10;G105L20;G10;L15;E10;U2 

0; D4; NL8; D4; NL12; D4NL16; D4; NL12; 

D4;NL8" 

470 PAINT (12,12) ,1,1 

480 CIRCLE (100, 100), 5 

490 LINE (200, 180) -(205, 185) ,PSE 

T,BF 

500 'IF NOT FIRST TIME CONTINUE 

510 IF FL=1 THEN 40 

520 'SHOW PRESENTATION SCREEN 

530 CLS(0) 

540 ' PR I NTPEEK ( &HFF00 ) : A*= I NKE Y* 

:IF A*="" THEN 301 ELSE POKE &HF 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 63 



F02 , &H00 : PR INTFEEK ( &HFF00 ) : END 

550 PRINTQB, "space"; :PRINT@14,"p 

rpmenade"; 

560 PRINT@64,"a"; : PRINT@66, "grap 

hies"; :PRINT@75,"ANIMATIC"; :PRIN 

T@84, "program"; 

570 PRINT®106,"by"5 : PRINTQ109, "r 

ita"; :PRINT@114,"sabo"; 

580 FOR 1=0 TO 63sSET(I,10,7):SE 

TU,31,7):NEXT 

590 FOR 1=10 TO 31:SET<0,I,7>:SE 

T<63,I,7> :NEXT 

600 PRINTS230," INSTRUCTIONS (Y/N 

)?"; 

610 A*=INKEY$:IF A*="" THEN 610 

620 IF A$<>"Y" THEN GOTO 770 

630 'PRESENT INSTRUCTIONS 

640 PR INTS230, STRING* (20, CHR$ < 12 

B)>; 

650 TX$(0)="your mission is to m 

aneuver " 

660 TX*<l)="the spaceship thru t 

he meteors" 

670 TX*(2)="rain and suecess-fuly 

cross the" 
680 TX* (3) ""contact bomb barrier 

to safely" 
690 TX*(4)="arrive on the planet 




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earth in" 
700 TX*(5)="the bottom right— go 
od luck! !" 

710 TX*<6>=" press ENTER to con 
tinue " 

720 P0=225:F0R 1=0 TO 6s FOR J=1T 
30:A*=MID*(TX*<I> ,J,l)iIF A*=" 

" THEN A*~ PLAY"T250O4D" ELS 

E PLAY"T250L1O1C" 

730 PRINT@PO,A*;:FORH=1TO10:NEXT 

:PO=PO+1:GOSUBB60:FOR K=l TO 50: 

NEXT: NEXT: P0=PO+2: IF 1=5 THEN PO 

=P0+32 

740 NEXT 

750 A*=INKEY*:IF A*="" THEN 6QSU 

B 860: GOTO 750 

760 PRESENT BAME OPTIONS 

770 CLS ( 5 ) : PR 1 NTS290 , " " ; : I NPUT " 

HOW MANY ASTERO I DS " ; D 

780 IF D<1 THEN 770 ELSE IF D>6 

THEN SOUND 1 , 1 : PRINTS362, "MASOCH 

ISTIC?! !";:PRINT@384, "above 6 is 

too much even for you" : FOR I ==1 T 
1500 s NEXT: GOTO770 

790 PR I NTS360 , " j OYST I CK/ kEYBOARD 

ii • 

800 PRINTe389,"(WITH JOYSTICK IS 

EASIER)"; 
810 A*=INKEY*:IF A*="" THEN 810 
820 IF A*<>"K" AND A*<>"J" THEN 
SOUND 1,1: GOTO 790 
830 SOUND 200,1 

840 IF A*="K" THEN F2=7:F3=8:F4= 
8 ELSE F2=4:F3=4:F4^4 
850 GOTO 40 

860 IF SW=0 THEN PRINTQ75, "ANIMA 
TIC"; ELSE PRINTQ75,STRING*<B T CH 
R*<128)>; 
870 SW=N0T SW: RETURN 



Listing3:RNIMCALC 



r 170 ... 


....53 


400 ... 


....46 


END 


.100 





10 'THIS PROGRAM WILL CALCULATE 
THE REQUIRED SIZES FOR ANIMATIC' 
S OBJECTS. 
20 * IT WILL ALSO SUGGEST A START 

ADDRESS FOR ANIMATIC *S CODE 
30 CLS:PRINT"ANIMATIC*S WORK ARE 
AS SIZES" 

40 I NPUT "NUMBER OF OBJECTS"; OB 
50 IF QB<1 OR 0B>255 THEN 40 
60 DIM OB(OB) ,PM<0B) ,X(0B) ,Y(OB) 
,MX$<QB) 

70 FOR 1=1 TO OB 
80 CLS (5) 



64 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



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within text. 

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Edit two files simultaneously • Save or Print only a portion of the text 
buffer • Edit files larger than memory (uses disk as buffer) • Block 
Copy from one file to another • Execute any OS-9 command from 
Editor 

If you want powerful features AND a program that's 
EASY TO USE, Elite* Word is for you... 



Elite-Word TAPE RS# 900-183 
Elite-Word DISK RS# 900-184 
Elite-Word/QS-9 RS# 900-186 



THE BEST FOR ONLY 
Specify Tape $ 69 95 

RS Disk $ 69.95 

OS-9 Disk $ 79.95 

OS-9 & RS Disk $115.95 



"Elite* Word is a terrific word processor with an impressive list 
Of features, yet it's easy to learn and use/' 

—Stuart Hawkinson, HOT COCO 
"I was more than satisfied with Elite* Word .. . After the review, 
I would not hesitate to compare it with the two best selling 
word processors. And my comparison places it at the top of 
the list." 

-A. Buddy Hogan, RAINBOW 



EliteFile 



THIS IS IT! ELITE*FILE is the Data Base Manager that Color 
Computer users have been waiting for. EUTE*FILE is for 
everyone who needs to store and retrieve information. 
ELITE*FILE is a full-featured relational Data Base Manager 
with all the editing and report formatting features that are 
typically found on much larger computer systems. COM- 
PARE the others for record structure flexibility, total record 
capacity, information processing ability, speed of program 
response, printed output flexibility, and you'll agree that 
ELITE*FILE may very well be the most powerful /useful pro- 
gram ever written for the Color Computer. 



"/ like Elite 'File and would readily recommend it to 
anyone. J ts power and speed have to be seen to be 
appreciated. " 

-Ed Lowe, RAINBOW 

"Elite • File is a very decent program and you can learn 
to do afot with it in a hurry. " 



-Scott L Norman, HOT COCO 



No other File Manager gives you these features: 
All machine language for speed • Flexible, user defined, 
data record structures • Up to 255 characters per record 
field • Up to 255 fields per record • Up to 2000 charac- 
ters per record • Up to 4000 records per file • Up to 1 6 
files can be open at the game time for information pro- 
cessing • Edit, Scan, Sort, Select Record information; all 
done FAST • Output reports to Screen, Printer, or ASCII 
Disk file • Place output data by Field Name, with Custom 
Text anywhere on the printed page • Perform math oper- 
ations (+, -, *, /) between Field contents • Produce tabu- 
lated reports from multiple record contents • Generate 
column totals across record field contents. 

Compatible with Elite»Calc and ElitetWord files • User friendly 
combination of Menu driven input, and single key commands • Sup- 
ports up to 4 drives • Minimum 32K RAM, Disk required * Nested 
sub-field definitions • Up to 8 fields in Primary Key • Copy record 
definition from file to file • View/Print record definition • Input/Add 
records with easy to use field name format display • Edit records 
with fullscreen "type over" editor • Copy records to repeat identical 
data • Load Elite»Calc worksheets into random access data files • 
Scan mode for quick data retrieval 



Radio Shack®catalog# 900-189 
COMPARE features and per- 
formance speed . . . you'll agree 
that Elite •File is the one to buy. 



THE BEST 
FOR ONLY 

$74.50 

Disk Only 



Productive Programs for Serious Users 







Add $3.00 shipping and handling 










PA Residents add 6% Sales Tax 

OS-9 is a trademark of Microware and Motorola, 


Jg4 






Box 11 


Dealer Inquiries Invited 
224 • Pittsburgh, PA 1 5238 • (41 2) 795 


-8492 





90 PRINTTAB (20) ; "object #";:PRIN 

TUS I NG "###"; I 

100 INPUT "OBJECT TO BE MIXED (Y 

/N)"!MX* 

110 IF MXfO"Y" AND MX#<>"N" THE 

N 100 

120 INPUT "PMODE (0-4) " ; PM 

130 IF PM<0 OR PM>4 THEN 120 

140 INPUT "WIDTH IN PIXELS (1-10 

0) ";X 

150 IF X<1 OR X>100 THEN 140 

160 INPUT "HEIGHT IN PIXELS (1-1 

00) ";Y 

170 IF MX*-"Y" THEN MX=1 ELSE MX 

=0 

180 PM ( I ) =PM: X ( I ) =X: Y ( I ) =Y: MX* ( I 

)=MX* 

190 IF Y<1 OR Y>100 THEN 160 

200 IF INT(X/2)OX/2 AND PM<>4 T 

HEN X=X+1 

210 IF PM=0 OR PM=2 THEN X=INT(X 

/2) 

220 X=INT(X/8) 

230 RM-7-X 

240 X=X+1:IF RM>1 THEN X=X+1 

250 IF (Y/2 <> INT(Y/2)) AND PM< 

2 THEN Y=Y+1 

260 IF PM<2 THEN Y=INT(Y/2) 



THEN T«T*2 



Finally! A Nutritional tontenl Progfam 

?:* Calculates id&at ■■w«iht--^-ei^rieVre^i^e#; 

• Galcuiates caloric cart)ohy 
hamin and mineral intake.^;^^^^:^^:^^^ ; ; ; 

.Graphic ptottiog of your weigW and comparison to 

• Create your -^e^fi--r«-c^S;fwrn:-'-to^:-#i:iae"-and 
enter recipes into food file for future reference. 

'■■• Allows addition of new food iternstofoodfiie. 
Requires 64KGoa3W/Disc Drive 

Ages 25-5Q Women 4'&'- #fe;S'T\;;-^ 



ONLY $24.95 until Aug., then $29.95 




Please send me . 



NUTRIGUIDES(S)at 



$24.95 each (if mailed by Aug. 1, 1985). 

□ VISA □ MC # 

Ex. Date Bank # 

Name (print) _ 

Address . 

City 



_(MC) 



_State 



-Zip 



Signed — 

Mail to Homesoft, P. O. Box 607, Baker, LA 70704-0607 x»v 

Allow 4 to 6 weeks for delivery. rainbow 



PRINTER" ;DV* 
DV=-2 ELSE D 



MIX 



270 T=X*Y 

280 IF MX=1 

290 OB(I)=T 

300 TT=TT+T 

310 NEXT 

320 CLS(7) 

330 INPUT "ACTUAL OFFSET OF ANIM 

ATIC";OF 

340 INPUT "OUTPUT TO 

350 IF DV#="Y" THEN 

V=0 

360 CLS 

370 PRINT"OBJ# PMODE 

Y BYTES" 

380 FOR 1=1 TO OB 

390 PRINT#DV,USING"### " ; I ; : PR 

INT#DV, USING" # ";PM(I);:PRINT 

#DV," ";MX*;" "; :PRINT#DV, USING" 
### ";X(I);:PRINT#DV,USING" ### 
" ; Y ( I ) ; : PRINT#DV,USING" ####" ; O 

B(I) 

400 NEXT 

410 PRINT#DV:PRINT#DV,TAB(11) ,"S 

WAPS== > " ; s PR I NT#D V , US I NG " #### " ; 

TT 

420 PRINT#DV:PRINT#DV," RE 

QUIRED FDTS ==>";: PR I NT#DV, USING 

" ####";0B*24 

430 TX=TT+0B*24 

440 PRINT#DV:PRINT#DV,TAB(10) , "T 

0TAL -- > " ; s PR I NT#DV , US I NG " #### " ; 

TX 

450 PRINT#DV," ":PRINT#DV,"YOU C 

AN RELOCATE AN I MAT I C AT" 

460 SZ=PEEK(8*H74)*256+PEEK(&H75) 
: AD=SZ-TX-2B00 

470 PR I NT#DV, "ADDRESS: *";AD;"(H 

EX=";HEX*(AD);") *" 

480 AJ=AD-OF;IF AJ<0 THEN AJ=&HF 

FFF+AJ+1 

490 PRINT#DV,"MAKE: 

LOADM ' AN I MAT I C 



+" , "+"&H"+HEX* (AJ+2800) +" , 



":PRINT#DV," 
;"&H"+HEX$(AJ) 
"&H" 



+HEX*<AJ) 
500 GOTO 500 

Listing4: ANIMFITIC 



00010 •— ANIMATIC. (C) 1903 BY RITA SABO — « 
00020 * BAS IS THE ROUTINE THAT HANDLES A1UM INST. 





0000 


00030 BAS 


EQU 


* 


0000 CE 


0139 


00040 


LDU 


#$139 


0003 A6 


C4 


00050 


LDA 


»u 


0005 81 


02 


00060 


CMPA 


n 


0007 2D 


09 


00070 


M.T 


NODSK 


0009 33 


4A 


00080 


LEAU 


10, u 


OOOB 6P 


5B 


00090 


CLR 


-5,U 


0O0D 8E 


B277 


00100 


LDX 


0$B277 


0010 AP 


5E 


00110 


STX 


-2,U 


0012 86 


01 


€0120 N0DSK 


LDA 


#1 


0014 A7 


CO 


00130 


STA 


,U+ 


0016 30 


8D 008E 


00140 


I.EAY 


BANIH,PCR 


001A AF 


CI 


00150 


SIX 


,U++ 


001 C 30 


8D 000E 


00160 


LEAX 


DUMEX,PCR 


0020 AF 


CI 


00170 


STX 


t U++ 


0022 8E 


B277 


00180 


LDX 


#$B277 


0025 AF 


43 


00190 


STX 


3,11 


0027 AF 


48 


00200 


STX 


8,U 


0029 6F 


40 


00210 


CLR 


0,U 


002B 6F 


45 


00220 


CLR 


5,0 


002D 39 




00230 


RTS 





68 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



CoCo's Best & Fastest Spreadsheet System 

ACCLAIMED BY THE EXPERTS 

"DYNACALC is my choice for a CoCo spreadsheet" 
Dan Downard, RAINBOW, September, 1984. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



920 




"Eat your heart out, Lotus 1-2-3!" 
Scott Norman, HOT CoCo, October, 1984 

Built-in Features: 

51 x 24 Display with Lower Case 

Super-fast Smart Screen Refresh 

Auto-Repeat Keyboard Driver 

Keysaver (TM) repeats last command x times 

Disk Operating System (works just like ROM DOS) 

Easy communication with BASIC/DOS programs 

Two-way communications with PRO-COLOR-FILE * Enhanced* 

Outputs to ASCII Word Processors like Telewriter-64 

Fast 16-Digit Arithmetic with Scientific Functions 

Summation, Mean, and Standard Deviation Functions 

Logical Functions with String & Numeric Comparison 

String locate command to navigate large worksheets 

Sort full or partial worksheet by columns or rows 

Line, Bar, Hi/Lo/Close, Circle Graphs 

Full Graphics captioning and overlay facility 

Graphics Drivers for all popular Printers 

Joystick/Mouse Driver for Cursor Movement 

Works with any ROM versions, even JDOS 

33k Available Worksheet Space 

Up to 256 Columns or 256 Rows 

Can use VisiCalc worksheets & training materials 

On-screen Help Messages 

FOR 64K DISK SYSTEMS 

available from 



NOW 
ONLY 

$9995 




%'0 



now with 

GRAPHICS! 



Jan Feb flar Apr Tlav ' Jun Jul fclug £ep Oct Nov 



% 




^.U 



CANADA-CDN $129.95 

DATAMAN INTERNATIONAL 
420 FERGUSON AVE. N. 
HAMILTON, ONT. L8L 4Y9 
(416) 529-1319 AUSTRALIA" 

PARIS RADIO 

161 BUNNERONG RD. 

KINGSFORD 2032 NSW 

(612) 344-9111 




COMPUTER SYSTEMS CENTER 

^-^rr" 42 Four Seasons Center #122 
Nfc^l-Q Chesterfield, MO 63017 USA 
^OpSSi— ~ (314) 576-5020 

• 10 to 6 Mon.-Fri. 

or your local DYNACALC dealer 

Price US$99.95 
Outside North America add $10 postage 

DYNACALC Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 

Lotus and 1-2-3 are trademarks of Lotus Development Corp. 

PRO-COLOR-FILE is a trademark of Derringer Software 

Telewriter-64 is a trademark of Cognitec 

VisiCalc is a trademark of VisiCorp. 



002E CO 
0030 B6 
0033 81 
0035 27 
0037 CO 

0039 34 
003B BD 
003E 35 

0040 BD 
0043 IP 
0045 31 
0049 E7 
004B 86 
004D 34 
004F BD 
0052 E6 
0056 CI 
0058 27 
005A CI 
005C 26 
005E 86 
0060 A7 
0062 20 

0064 BE 
0067 86 
0069 E6 
OOGB CI 
006D 27 
006F CI 
0071 26 
0073 86 
0075 A7 
0077 20 
0079 4A 
007A 26 
007C 7E 
007F BD 
0082 IF 
0084 20 

0086 5F 

0087 35 
0089 E7 
008B 4A 
008C 26 
008 E BD 
0091 86 
0093 A7 
0097 31 
00 9B A6 
009D 81 
009F 1026 
00A3 EC 
00A5 16 



002E 

44 

0139 

01 

02 

OC 

04 

B26A 

04 

B73D 

10 

8D 09D9 

AO 

07 

22 

B26D 

9F 00A6 

2C 

2C 

29 

06 

01 

E4 

22 

0064 

00A6 

08 

80 

2C 

10 

29 

06 

01 

E4 

06 



ED 

B277 

B73D 

10 
01 

22 
AO 

BF 

B267 

01 

8D 0998 

8D 0987 

AO 

08 

004F 

A4 

0008 



00240 I 

00250 

00260 

00270 

00280 

00290 

00300 i 

00310 

00320 

00330 

00340 

00350 

00360 

00370 

00380 

00390 

00400 

00410 

00420 

00430 

00440- 

00450 

00460 

00470 

00480 

00490 

00500 

00510 

00520 

00530 

00540 

00550 

00560 

00570 

00580 

00590 

00600 

00610 

00620 

00630 

00640 

00650 

00660 

00670 

00680 

00690 

00700 

00710 

00720 

00730 

00740 

00750 

00760 

00770 

00780 



BZERO 
BOUTL 



EQU 

SUBB 

LDA 

CMPA 

BEQ 

SUBB 

PS HS 

JSR 

PULS 

JSR 

TFR 

LEAY 

STB 

LDA 

PSEIS 

JSR 

LDB 

CMPB 

BEQ 

CMPB 

BNE 

LDA 

STA 

BRA 

Equ 

LDX 

LDA 

LDB 

CMPB 

BEQ 

CMPB 

BNE 

LDA 

STA 

BRA 

DECA 

BNE 

JMP 

JSR 

TFR 

BRA 

CI.RB 

PULS 

STB 

DECA 

BNE 

JSR 

LDA 

STA 

LEAY 

LDA 

CMPA 

LBNE 

LDD 

LBRA 



068 

$139 

#1 

DUM2 

#12 

B 

$B26A 

B 

$B73D 

X t D 

PARMS.PCR 

07 
A,Y 
$B26D 
>[$A6] 

#'. 

BZERO 

#') 

BL2 

#1 

»5 

BZERO 

* 

>$A6 
#8 
,X+ 
**, 

BL3 

#') 

BL22 

#1 

,S 

BL3 

BL12 

$B277 

$B73D 

X,D 

BOUTL 

A,Y 
,Y+ 

BMORE 

SB267 

#1 

5+KCTAB , PCR 

PARMS.PCR 

#8 

ANIM 
,Y 
INFO 



(80 IF DISK) 



00A8 


41 


OOAB 


CD 


OOAC 





TO MAKE INFO"BAS+$B0 



NO MORE GAMES 



EZ PROFILER — counts how many times each line of a basic 
program is executed when it is run. Extended basic, 32K, 
one disk drive required. On a disk. $20.00 

EZ CASSETTE ENCRYPT — encrypts cassette files through 
use of a password. Encrypted files are unreadable until 
decrypted with the same password. All machine language. 
On a cassette. $25.00 

EZ DISK ENCRYPT — encrypts disk files. All machine 
language. Comes on a disk. $29.00 

EZ RAM DISK — use upper memory as if it were a disk drive. 
All machine language. Accesses all available memory. For 
16, 32 and 64K computers. On a cassette. $25.00 

EZ CASSETTE PILOT — run Pilot language programs on 
your CoCo. This preprocessor translates Pilot programs into 
Basic programs. For cassette systems. $15.00 

EZ DISK PILOT — translate Pilot programs on disk systems. 
On a disk. $19.00 

Both encrytion programs for $35.00. Both Pilot programs for 



$25.00. 

LANDWARE 

6 Larchmont Rd. 

Edison. N J 08817 

(201)738-4213 


RAINBOW 


No shipping charges. No handling charges. 
NJ residents add 6% tax. 





00790 BANIM FCC /ANI/ 
00800 FCB $CD 
00810 RMB 4 
00820 ************ 

00830 * INFO. 

00840 * ON ENTRY: D REGISTER WITH OPTIONS 

00850 * ON EXIT; D WITH ADDRESS OF FDT, FARMS OR XY 

00860 ************ 





00B0 


00870 INFO 


EQU 


* 




00B0 10EF 


8D 0939 


00880 


STS 


SAVSTK, 


PCR 


00 B5 30 


8D 0969 


00890 


LEAK 


PARMS.PCR 


0UB9 5D 




00900 


TSTB 




PARMS ADDR? 


00BA 26 


OD 


00910 


BNE 


ADFI 


FDT ADDR 


00BC 34 


10 


00920 


PSHS 


X 




00BE 86 


08 


00930 


LDA 


08 


CLEAR PARMS 


00C0 6F 


80 


00940 MCLPA 


CLR 


,X+ 




00C2 4 A 




00950 


DECA 






00C3 26 


FB 


00960 


BNE 


MCLPA 




00C5 35 


06 


00970 


PULS 


D 




00C7 20 


IE 


00980 


BRA 


EXINF 




00C9 34 


02 


00990 ADFI 


PSHS 


A 




00CB A6 


01 


01000 


LDA 


1,X 




00CD 34 


02 


01010 


PSHS 


A 




00CF E7 


01 


01020 


STB 


1,X 




00DI 17 


0773 


01030 


LBSR 


GETFDT 




00D4 35 


02 


01040 


PULS 


A 




00D6 A7 


01 


01050 


STA 


1,X 




00D8 35 


02 


01060 


PULS 


A 




00DA 4D 




01070 


TSTA 




XY-COORD . 


OODB 26 


08 


01080 


BNE 


ADF12 




OODD A6 


C8 08 


01090 


LDA 


<AUTOX , 


U X-COORD 


00E0 E6 


C8 09 


01100 


LDB 


<AUTOY, 


U Y-COORD 


00E3 20 


02 


omo 


BRA 


EXINF 




00E5 IF 


30 


01120 ADFI2 


TFR 


U,D 


RESULT 


0OE7 6D 


8D 0944 


01130 EXINF 


TST 


5+FCTAB 


,PCR RETURN TO ML? 


OOEB 27 


03 


01140 


BEQ 


RETINF 




00 ED 7E 


B4F4 


01150 


JMP 


$B4F4 


TO BASIC 


00F0 39 




01160 RETINF 


RTS 




TO ML 


00F1 12 




01170 


NOP 




ANIM=INFO+$40 




01 180 *——■-—— 










01190 * ANIMATIC. ASSEMBLY ENTRY POINT* 






01200 * ON 


ENTRY: 


PARMS SET 








01210 * ON 


EXIT: X= ADDR. OF PARMS * 






01220 *— 

01230 ANIM 










00F2 


EQU 






00F2 10EF 8D 08F7 


01240 


STS 


SAVSTK, 


PCR SAVE STACK ADDRESS 


00F7 32 


8D 0926 


01250 


LEAS 


49+STACK.PCR NEW STACK ADDRESS 


OOFB 6F 


8D 08B9 


01260 


CLR 


STATUS , 


PCR CLEAR STATUS AREA 


OOFF 6F 


8D 08B6 


01270 


CLR 


1+STATUS,PCR 


0103 30 


8D 091B 


01280 


LEAX 


PARMS, PCR LOAD PARMS ADDR. 


0107 A6 


84 


01290 


LDA 


,X 


CET REQUESTED FUNCTION 


0109 A7 


8D 089B 


01300 


STA 


ACTION 


PCR SAVE REQUESTED ACTION 


010D C6 


08 


01310 


LDB 


#8 


CHECK FOR ACTION 


010F El 


84 


01320 


CMPB 


,x 




0111 22 


05 


01330 


BHI 


GRA2 


IF OK CONTINUE 


0113 C6 


03 


01340 


LDB 


#XIO 


ELSE ERROR 


0115 16 


0815 


01350 


LBRA 


ERROR 




0118 C6 


03 


01360 GRA2 


LDB 


#3 


GET DISPLACEMENT 


011A 3D 




01370 


MUL 






011B 31 


8D 0002 


01380 


LEAY 


CALLS, PCR ADDR. OF CALL LIST 


OUF 6E 


A5 


01390 


JMP 


B,Y 


GO TO APPROPIATE CALL 




0121 


01400 CALLS 


EQU 


* 




0121 16- 


0015 


01410 


LBRA 


IN IT 


INITIALIZE 


0124 16 


0O3B 


01420 


LBRA 


CREATE 


CREATE FIGURE 


0127 16 


00F9 


01430 


LBRA 


MOVE 


MOVE FIGURE 


012A 16 


00F6 


01440 


LBRA 


PLACE 


PLACE FIG. ON SCREEN 


012D 16 


02 B8 


01450 


LBRA 


REMOVE 


ERASE FIG. FROM SCREEN 


0130 16 


02C4 


01460 


LBRA 


COPYFI 


COPY FIGURE . 


0133 16 


0372 


01470 


LBRA 


OPERAT 


OPERATE SWAP AREA WITH FUNCTION 


0136 16 


0320 


01480 

01490 * 


LBRA 


DOMAIN 


FIND IN A DOMAIN 

_ * 



01500 *INITIALIZE FCT (FIGURE 
01510 * CONTROL TABLE) ACT. 
01520 * ON ENTRY: X=ADDR. OF 
01530 * PARMS 





0139 


01540 
01550 


INIT 


EQU 


* 




0139 A6 


01 


01560 




LDA 


1,X NUMBER 


OF FIGS. 


013B 26 


05 


01570 




BNE 


INI 2 NUtlBER 


OF FIGS. 


013D C6 


02 


01580 




LDB 


#XOF CAN'T 


BE ZERO 


013F 16 


07EB 


01590 




LBRA 


ERROR 




0142 A7 


8D 08 E4 


01600 


INI2 


STA 


FCTAB,PCR 




0146 C6 


18 


01610 




LDB 


#24 GET ADDRESS FOR SWAP AREA 


0148 3D 




01620 




MUL 


Kbytes 


FOR FFDT'S 


0149 31 


8D 08E3 


01630 




LEAY 


F FDT .PCR 


FIRST FFDT ADDRESS 


014D 34 


20 


01640 




PSHS 


Y 




OUF E3 


El 


0J650 




ADDD 


,S++ ADD TO 


BYTES FOR FFDT'S 


0151 ED 


8D 08D8 


01660 




STD 


3+FCTAB.PCR 


ADDR, OF FIRST SWAP AREA 


0155 6F 


8D 08D2 


01670 




CLR 


1+FCTAB,PCR 


NUMBER OF CREATED FIGS. 


0159 8b 


AA 


01680 




LDA 


#$AA INIT FLAG 


01 5B A7 


8D 08CD 


01690 




STA 


2+FCTAB.PCR 




015F 16 


082E 


01700 




LBRA 


EXIT 








01710 


* ,„_ 





._„_#. 








01720 


* CREATE FIGURE (ACT. 1) * 








01730 


* ON ENTRY: X= 


ADDR. OF * 








01740 
01750 


* 


PARMLIST * 


















0162 


01760 


CREATE 


EQU 


* 




0162 31 


8D 08C4 


01770 




LEAY 


FCTAB.PCR 


ADDR. OF FCT 


0166 6C 


8D 08C1 


01780 




INC 


1+FCTAB,PCR 


NUMBER OF FIGS CREATED 


016A A6 


8D 08BD 


01790 




LDA 


1+FCTAB.PCR 




016E A7 


01 


01800 




STA 


1 ,X STORE 


IT IN PARMS 


0170 17 


06D4 


01810 




LBSR 


GETFDT 




0173 EC 


A8 03 


01820 




LDD 


<NEXTSW,Y 


NEXT SWAP AREA 


0176 ED 


C8 00 


01830 




STD 


<ASW,U STORE 


IT IN FDT 


0179 A6 


03 


01840 




LDA 


3,X X-COORD. 


017B A7 


8D 0825 


01850 




STA 


CADX.PCR 




017F A6 


04 


01860 




LDA 


4,X Y-COORD. 


0181 A7 


8D 0821 


01870 




STA 


CADY.PCR 




0185 A6 


07 


01880 




LDA 


7,X ACTION 


IF OUT-OF -SCREEN 


0187 A7 


C8 10 


01890 




STA 


<OUTSCR,U 




018A E6 


05 


01900 




LDB 


5,X tfCOLS. 




018C 27 


04 


01910 




BEQ 


CER1 -0? 




018E CI 


65 


01920 




CMPB 


tflOl MASX. 


NUMBER OF X PIXELS 


0190 25 


05 


01930 




BLO 


CRA OK 




0192 C6 


04 


01940 


CER1 


LDB 


#XEX ELSE ERROR 



70 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



fr-..: 



0194 16 


0796 


01950 




LBRA 


ERROR 


0197 E7 


C8 


04 


01960 


CRA 


STB 


<WIDTH,U 


01 9A, IF 


98 




01970 




TFR 


B,A USE A REG. 


019C 84 


01 




01900 




ANDA 


#1 TO SEE IF ODD NOHBER 


019E 27 


OA 




01990 




BEQ 


CR1 IF EVEN CONTINUE 


01A0 96 


B6 




02000 




LDA 


<$B6 ELSE GET PMODE 


01A2 81 


04 




02010 




CMPA 


#4 IF PMODE 4 


01A4 27 


04 




02020 




BEQ 


CR1 DO NOTHING 


01A6 6C 


C8 


04 


02030 




INC 


<WIDTH,U ELSE ROUND-UP WIDTH 


01A9 5C 






02040 




INCB 




01AA 17 


066A 


02050 


f!Rl 


LBSR 


CMAXBY FIND MAX- # OF BYTES 


01AD A6 


06 




02060 




LDA 


6,X #ROWS 


01AF 27 


04 




02070 




BEQ 


CER2 =0? 


01B1 81 


65 




02080 




CM FA 


#101 MAX. NUMBER OF Y PIXELS 


01B3 25 


05 




02090 




BLO 


CRB OK 


01B5 Cb 


05 




02100 


CER2 


LDB 


#XEY ELSE ERROR 


01B7 16 


0773 


02110 




LBRA 


ERROR 


01BA A7 


C8 


05 


02120 


CRB 


STA 


<HEIGHT,U 


01BD 84 


01 




02130 




ANDA 


#1 TO SEE IF ODD NUMBER 


01BF 27 


09 




02140 




BEQ 


CR2 IF EVEN CONTINUE 


01C1 96 


B6 




02150 




LDA 


<$B6 ELSE GET PMODE 


01G3 81 


01 




02160 




CMPA 


#1 IF PMODES 2,3,4 


01C5 22 


03 




02170 




BUI 


CR2 DO NOTHING 


01C7 6C 


C8 


05 


02180 




IMC 


<HEIGHT,U ELSE ROUND-UP HEIGHT 


01CA 17 


0664 


02190 


CR2 


LBSR 


NORMY FIND MBYTES FOR ROWS 


01CD 3D 






02200 




HUL 


TOTAL BYTES FOR FIGURE 


01CE ED 


C9 


0012 


02210 




STD 


FIG BYT, U 


0102 6D 


02 




02220 




TST 


2 f X MIXABLE? 


01D4 27 


OC 




02230 




BEQ 


CR3 NO 


01D6 AE 


A8 


03 


02240 




inx 


<NEXTSW,Y 


01 D9 30 


OB 




02250 




LEAX 


D,X POINT TO SWAP FOR MIX. 


01DB AF 


C8 


02 


02260 




STX 


<ORFLAG,U 


01 DE 58 






02270 




AS LB 


MULTIPLY BYTES BY 2 


01DF 49 






02280 




ROLA 




01E0 20 


03 




02290 




BRA 


CR32 


01E2 6F 


C8 


02 


02300 


CR3 


CLR 


<ORFLAG,U NO-MIX 


01E5 AE 


A3 


03 


02310 


CR32 


LDX 


<NEXTSW,Y 


01E8 6F 


80 




02320 


CR4 


CLR 


jX+ CLEAR TO ZERO 


01 EA 83 


0001 


02330 




SOBD 


#1 NUMBER OF BYTES FOR NEW SWAP 


01ED 26 


F9 




02340 




BNE 


CR4 NOT DONE YET 


01EF AF 


A8 


03 


02350 




STX 


<NEXTSW,Y TO NEXT SWAP AREA 


01F2 9C 


74 




02360 




CMPX 


$74 EXCEEDS AVAILABLE MEMORY? 


01F4 23 


05 




02370 




BLS 


CRC NO, OK 


01F6 C6 


01 




02380 




LDB 


#XOH ELSE ERROR 


01F8 16 


0732 


02390 




LBRA 


ERROR 




01FB 


02400 


CRC 


EQU 


A 


01FB 17 


038A 


02410 




LBSR 


MOVGRN 


01FE 4F 






02420 




CLRA 




01FF 17 


04 FE 


02430 




LBSR 


SWAP2 GET FIGURE 


0202 6D 


C8 


02 


02440 




TST 


<ORFLAG,U OR-ABLE? 


0205 27 


13 




02450 




BEQ 


ENDCRE .. .NO EXIT 


0207 A6 


C8 


OA 


02460 




LDA 


<LMASK,U 


020A A7 


C8 


OC 


02470 




STA 


<OLMASK,U 


02 OD A6 


C8 


OB 


02480 




LDA 


<RMASK,U 


0210 A7 


C8 


OD 


02490 




STA 


<ORMASK,U 



0213 A6 


C8 OE 


0216 A7 


C9 0014 


021A 86 


01 


021 C A7 


C9 0011 


0220 16 


076D 





0223 




0223 


0223 6F 


8D 077C 


0227 6F 


8D 07 7A 


022B 17 


0619 


022E 6D 


C9 0011 


0232 27 


OA 


02 34 86 


03 


0236 A7 


8D 076E 


023A 6F 


C9 0011 




023E 


023E A6 


02 


0240 26 


OF 


0242 E6 


03 


0244 E7 


8D 07 5C 


0248 E6 


04 


024 A E7 


8D 0758 


024E 16 


014D 


0251 81 


01 


0253 26 


25 


0255 4F 




0256 E6 


C8 08 


0259 34 


06 


02 5B E6 


03 


025D 2A 


01 


025F 43 




0260 E3 


El 


0262 ED 


8D 073D 


0266 4F 




0267 E6 


C8 09 


026 A 34 


06 


026C E6 


04 


026E 2A 


01 


0270 43 




0271 E3 


El 


0273 ED 


8D 072E 


0277 16 


0124 


027A 81 


06 


027C 26 


25 


027E A6 


03 


0280 26 


04 


0282 86 


FF 


0284 6F 


05 


0286 17 


05F4 


0289 EB 


05 



02500 LDA <WIDBYT,U 

02510 , STA OWID,U 

02520 ENDCRE LDA #\ FLAG AS NEW 

02530 STA FLAGCR,U 

02540 LBRA EXIT 

02550 * * 

02560 * MOVE FIGURE (ACT. 2) * 

02570 * ON ENTRY: X^ ADDR. OF * 
02580 * PARMLIST * 

02590 * . * 

02600 MOVE EQU * 

02610 PLACE EQU * PLACE ALSO BEGINS HERE 

02620 CLR CACX.PCR 

02630 CLR CACY,PCR 

02640 LBSR GETFDT 

02650 TST FLAGCR.U FIG. JUST CREATED? 

02660 BEQ M01 NO GO AHEAD 

02670 LDA #3 FORCE ACTION 3 (PLACE) 

02680 STA ACTION, PCR 

02690 CLR FLAGCR.U DELETE JUST CREATED FLAG 

02700 M01 EQU * 

02710 LDA 2,X 

02720 BNE SPEMOV 

02730 LDB 3,X 

02740 STB CADX ,PCR X-DEST 

02750 LDB 4,X 

02760 STB CADY,PCR Y-DEST 

02770 LBRA XMOVE 

02780 SPEMOV CMPA #1 

02790 BNE RNDXY 

02800 CLRA 

02810 LDB <AUTOX,U RELATIVE MOVEMENT 

02820 PSHS D 

02030 LDB 3,X GET INCR. IN X 

02840 BPL CONX NEGATIVE? 

02850 COMA 

02860 CONX ADDD ,S++ ADD IT 

02870 STD CACX,PCR X-DEST. 

02880 CLRA 

02890 LDB <AUTOY,U UPDATE Y 

02900 PSHS D 

02910 LDB 4,X GET INCR. IN Y 

02920 BPL CONY NEGATIVE? 

02930 COMA 

02940 CONY ADDD ,S++ ADD IT 

02950 STD CACY.PCR Y-DEST. 

02960 LBRA XMOVE 

02970 RNDXY CMPA H IS X-Y RANDOM REQUESTED? 

02980 BNE NORAN 

02990 LDA 3,X GET MAX. ALLOWED COLUMN 

03000 BNE NODFX IF NOT ZERO CONTINUE 

03010 LDA #255 ELSE PUT DEFAULT 

03020 CLR 5,X 

03030 NODFX LBSR RANDOM GET RANDOM VALUE 

03040 ADDB 5,X 



THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER 

** (With New Low Prices) 



THE BEST HARDWARE 



WORD-PAK II 

80 column video cartridge 

switch and smooth scroll. 

C-C BUS 

6 slot software selectable 

P-CPAK(P) 

Fully buffered Centronics 

parallel port cartridge. 

PC PAK (R) 

Battery backed real time c 

PC PAK (C) 

Parallel port and real time 

cartridge. 

2SP-PAK 

Dual RS232 cartridge. 



$134.95 

with soft video 

$129.95 

expansion bus. 
$ 49.95 

compatible 

$ 59.95 

lock cartridge. 
$ 99.95 

clock in one 

$ 79.95 



THE BEST SOFTWARE 

Support Drivers 

Patches and drivers for OS-9 or Flex for Word-Pak, P-C Pak and 2SP 

Cbreeze 

Full screen editor for OS-9 Word-Pak with "windows" capability. 

(OS-9) *Stylo III wordprocessor 

(OS-9) *Stylo Pak (includes stylo, mailmerge and spell checker) 

(OS-9) *X-Word wordprocessor 

(OS-9) *X-Merge mail merge for X-Word 

(OS-9) *X-Term terminal package 

(BAS) *EliteWord wordprocessor 

(BAS) *EliteCalc spreadsheet 

(BAS) * Deft Pascal software development system 

(BAS) *DataPak II terminal package 



$ 17.95 


Pak. 


$ 29.95 


$ 99.95 


$199.95 


$ 79.95 


$ 29.95 


$ 59.95 


$ 79.95 


$ 79.95 


$ 89.95 


$ 44.95 



and THE BEST SUPPORT, all from 



* COMBO PRICE* 

Take 15% off the list price of any of these software packages when 
ordered with the Word-Pak II. 




bi 



'Innovative Products for the CoCo User" 



inc. 



Call or write today for our FREE Catalog 
P.O. Box 813 • North Bergen, N.J. 07047 • 201-330-1898 



OS-9 is a trademark of Microware. 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 71 



It's time we put 

our chips 

on the table 





and showed you our best 
deals on computer hardware. 



HARDWARE SPECIALS 



Extended Baste w/bk $ 39.95 

64k (DEI) Memory Upg $49.95 

26-31 29CoCo Drive $309.95 

26-1 161 CoCo Drive 1 $229.95 

HJL Keyboard (D.E.F. 2) $79.95 

26-31 27 64K Extended CoCo2 $179.95 

26-31 34 1 6K Standard CoCo2 $ 89.95 

26-3136 16K Extended CoCo2 $129.95 

26-3802 Model 100 24K $449.95 
26-381 6P8K Upgrade Model 100 $55.95 

ACCESSORIES 

Volksmodem1200 $299.95 

RSD.C. Modem IB $ 89.95 

Novation J-Cat Modem $129.95 

USR Password 300 $179.95 

Hayes SM 300 Modem $239.95 

USR Password 1200 $399.95 

USR Password 2400 $599.95 

CoCo Switcher $ 39.95 

Elephant Disks ssdd $18.95 

NEW! Dual Double Sided Drives including 

case, power supply & cable $375.95 



26-1276 DMP-105 Printer 80 cps $179.95 
C Itoh 8510 BPI Printer 120 cps $399.95 
C Itoh 7500 Printer $249.95 

NAP Video Monitor (Grn 
Amber) $109.95 

Vioeo Monitor Adapters $ 29.95 

26-3124 Multi-Pac interface $ 89 95 
BotekSer/ Par Interface $ 69.95 

26-1 278 DWP 220 Printer$539.95 
26-3860 Model 200 $899.95 



Mach II Joystick 
26-3030 OS-9 (64k) 
Basic-09 (req. OS-9) 
"C" Compiler (OS-9) 
FHLO-Pak(rbq OS-9) 
Elite Word 
Elite Calc 
Color Term Plus 
Deft Pascal 

26-3012 Deluxe Joystick 
NEW! 26-3128 64K 
Direct Video CoCo2 



$ 39.95 
$ 64.95 (disk) 
$ 87.95 (disk) 
$ 87.95 (disk) 
$ 34.95 (disk) 
$59.95 (dtc)< 
$59,95 (dtc) 
$29.95 (cass) 
$ 79.95 
$ 34.95 

$219.95 



OS-9 is a trademark of Microware 



MSI SOFTWARE 

MSI DISKUTIL NEW $ 19.95 

COLOR FINANCE IV $69.95 

COLOR FINANCE II NEW $ 69.95 



MSI NAMEFILE $ 24.95 

MSI CALENDAR NEW $ 19.95 

MSI COLOR PAYROLL NEW $99.95 



Call lor prices and availability of your favorite software and hardware. All advertised 
items subject to availability. Prices do not include shipping and handling. All of the 
above units are covered by our 120 day carry-in warranty. 

TRS-80 Trademark Tandy Corporation. Prices subject to change without notice. 

Write for our FREE newsletter. 



BUM 

■Hi 

H 



DELKER ELECTRONICS, INC 

P.O. Box 897 

408C Nissan Blvd. Smyrna, TN 37167 

Cad Toll Free: 
600-251*008 
800-34B>2502 (TENNESSEE) 
610*459-2636 (TENNESSEE) 
615-254-OOee (NASHVILLE) 



028B E7 


8D 0715 


03050 


SIB 


CADX,PCR AND STORE NEW X-COORD. 


028F A6 


04 


03060 


LDA 


4,X MAX, ALLOWED ROW 


0291 26 


04 


03070 


BNE 


NODFY IF NOT ZERO CONTINUE 


0293 86 


BF 


03080 


LDA 


#191 ELSE PUT DEFAULT 


0295 6F 


06 


03090 


CLR 


6,X 


0297 17 


03E3 


03100 NODFY 


LBSR 


RANDOM GET RANDOM VALUE 


029A EB 


06 


03110 


ADDB 


6.X 


029C E7 


8D 0706 


03120 


STB 


CADY,PCR NEW Y-COORD. 


02A0 16 


OOFB 


03130 


LBRA 


XMOVE CONTINUE 


02A3 1U2D 


0080 


03140 NORAN 


LBLT 


RDJOY 


02A7 81 


07 


03150 


CM PA 


#7 


02A9 26 


6B 


03160 


BNE 


STAY 


02AB 86 


BF 


03170 


LDA 


#$BF KEYBOARD CONTROL 


02AD B7 


FF02 


03180 


STA 


$FF02 


02B0 4F 




03190 


CLRA 




02B1 E6 


C8 08 


03200 


LDB 


<AUT0X,U 


02B4 34 


06 


03210 


PSHS 


D 


02 B6 E6 


03 


03220 


LDB 


3,X 


02B8 B6 


FFOO 


03230 


LDA 


$FF00 


02BB 81 


F7 


03240 


CMPA 


#247 


02BD 26 


07 


03250 


BNE 


KBXP2 


02BF 4F 




03260 


CLRA 




02C0 E3 


E4 


03270 


ADDD 


,S 


02C2 ED 


E4 


03280 


STD 


,s 


02C4 E6 


03 


03290 


LDB 


3,X 


02C6 77 


FF02 


03300 KBXP2 


ASR 


$FF02 


02C9 B6 


FFOO 


03310 


LDA 


$FF00 


02CC 81 


F7 


03320 


CMPA 


#247 


02CE 26 


OA 


03330 


BNE 


KBXEX 


02D0 4F 




03340 


CLRA 




02D1 50 




03350 


NEGB 




02D2 27 


02 


03360 


BEQ 


KB2X 


02D4 86 


FF 


03370 


LDA 


#$FF 


02 D6 E3 


E4 


03380 KB2X 


ADDD 


,s 


02D8 ED 


E4 


03390 


STD 


> s 


02DA EC 


El 


03400 KRXEX 


LDD 


,s++ 


02UC ED 


8D 06C3 


03410 


STD 


CACX,PCR 


02EO 4F 




03420 


CLRA 




02E1 E6 


C8 09 


03430 


LDB 


<AUTOY,U 


02E4 34 


06 


03440 


PSHS 


D 


02E6 E6 


04 


03450 


LDB 


4,X 


02E8 77 


FF02 


034GO 


ASR 


$FF02 


02EB B6 


FFOO 


03470 


LDA 


$FF00 


02EE 81 


F7 


03480 


CI1PA 


#247 


02FO 26 


07 


03490 


BNE 


KBYP2 


02F2 4F 




03500 


CLRA 




02F3 E3 


E4 


03510 


ADDD 


,S 


02F5 ED 


E4 


03520 


STD 


»s 


02F7 E6 


04 


03530 


LDB 


4,X 


02F9 77 


FF02 


03540 KBYP2 


ASR 


$FF02 


02FC B6 


FFOO 


03550 


LDA 


$FF00 


02FF 81 


F7 


03560 


CMPA 


#247 


0301 26 


OA 


03570 


BNE 


KBYEX 


0303 4F 




03580 


CLRA 




0304 50 




03590 


NEGB 




0305 27 


02 


03600 


BEQ 


KB2Y 


0307 86 


FF 


03610 


LDA 


#$FF 


0309 E3 


E4 


03620 KB2Y 


ADDD 


,s 


030B ED 


E4 


03630 


STD 


,s 


030D EC 


El 


03640 KBYEX 


LDD 


,S++ 


030F EO 


8D 0692 


03650 


STD 


CACY.PCR 


0313 16 


0088 


03660 


LDRA 


XMOVE 


0316 A6 


C8 08 


03670 STAY 


LDA 


<AUT0X ,U 


0319 A7 


8D 0687 


03680 


STA 


CADX.PCR 


031D A6 


C8 09 


03690 


LDA 


<AUT0Y,U 


0320 A7 


8D 0682 


03700 


STA 


CADY,PCR 


0324 16 


OOBB 


03710 


LBRA 


M03 


0327 34 


52 


03720 RDJOY 


PSHS 


U,X,A 


0329 AD 


9F AOOA 


03730 


JSR 


[$A00A] READ JOYSTICK 


032D 35 


52 


03740 


PULS 


U,X,A RESTORE 


032F 108E 015A 


03750 


LDY 


#$015A ADDRESS OF VALUES 


0333 81 


02 


03760 


CMPA 


#2 IF LEFT JOYST. 


0335 27 


06 


03770 


BEQ 


EXPAND 


0337 81 


04 


03780 


CMPA 


#4 LEFT JOYSTK? 


0339 27 


02 


03790 


BEQ 


EXPAND YES 


033B 31 


22 


03800 


LEAY 


2,Y POINT TO RIGHT JOYS VALUES 


03 3D 80 


04 


03810 EXPAND SUBA 


#4 XY INDICATOR-4 


033F 2A 


1C 


03820 


RPL 


INCJY JOYSTK. INCREMENT 


0341 68 


A4 


03830 


LSL 


,Y MULTIPLY X-READING BY 4 


0343 68 


A4 


03840 


LSL 


,Y 


0345 68 


A4 


03850 


LSL 


t Y 


0347 68 


A4 


03860 


LSL 


( Y 


0349 68 


2) 


03870 


LSL 


1,Y MULTIPLY Y READING BY 3 


034B 68 


21 


03880 


LSL 


1,Y 


034D 68 


21 


03890 


LSL 


1,Y 


034F E6 


A4 


03900 


LDB 


,Y GET Y-COORD 


0351 E7 


8D 064E 


03910 


STB 


CADX,PCR STORE IT 


0355 E6 


21 


03920 


LDB 


1 ,Y GET Y-COORD 


0357 E7 


8D 064B 03930 


STB 


CADY,PCR STORE IT 


035B 20 


41 


03940 


BRA 


XMOVE 




035D 


03950 INCJY 


EQU 


* 


035D A6 


A4 


03960 


LDA 


,Y GET X READING 


035F 80 


20 


03970 


SUBA 


#32 MINUS 32 


0361 A7 


A4 


03980 


STA 


,Y 


0363 A6 


21 


03990 


LDA 


1,Y NOW Y-READING 


0365 80 


20 


04000 


SUBA 


#32 


0367 A7 


21 


04010 


STA 


l.Y 


0369 86 


03 


04020 


LDA 


#3 NOW DIVIDE BY 8 


036B 67 


A4 


04030 DIVCN 


ASR 


,Y 


036D 67 


21 


04040 


ASR 


1,Y 


036F 4A 




04050 


DECA 




0370 26 


F9 


04060 


BNE 


DIVCN 


0372 A6 


03 


04070 


LDA 


3,X GET X MULTIPLIER 


0374 E6 


A4 


04080 


LDB 


,Y AND X READING 


0376 3D 




04090 


MUL 




0377 4D 




04100 


TSTA 


CHECK IF RESULT SHOULD BE NEG. 


0378 27 


02 


04110 


BEQ 


DIV1 POSITIVE 


037A 86 


FF 


04120 


LDA 


#$FF MAKE IT NEG. 


037C 34 


06 


04130 DIV1 


PSHS 


D 


037E 4F 




04140 


CLRA 




037F E6 


C8 08 


04150 


LDB 


<AUTOX,U ACTUAL X LOCATION 


0382 E3 


El 


04160 


ADDD 


,S-H- NEW LOCATION 



72 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



0304 ED 
0388 A6 


8D 061B 

04 


04170 
04180 


STD 
LDA 


CACX.PCR STORE IT 
4,X Y-MULTIPLIER 


0479 AB 
047C A7 


C8 05 

06 


05320 
05330 


ADDA 
STA 


<HEIGHT,U BOTTOM ROW OF DOMAIN 
6,X 


03 8A E6 
038C 3D 


21 


04190 
04200 


LDB 


1,Y Y-READING 




047E 


05340 DOM2 


EQU 


* VERIFY IF IN DOMAIN 


038D 4D 




04210 


TSTA 


IS RESULT NEGATIVE? 


04 /E 17 
0481 5F 


03 C6 


05350 
05360 


LBSR 
CLRB 


GETFDT FOR REQUESTED FIG. 


038E 27 
0390 86 


02 

FF 


04220 
04230 


BEQ 
LDA 


DIV2 NO 

#$FF MAKE IT NEGATIVE 


0482 A6 
0485 Al 


C8 08 

05 


05370 
05380 


LDA 
CMPA 


<AUTOX,U LEFT COL IS 
5,X 


0392 34 


06 


04240 DIV2 


PSHS 


D 


0487 22 


17 


05390 


BUI 


OUTDOM DOMAIN? 


0394 4F 




04250 


CLRA 




0489 AB 


C8 04 


05400 


ADDA 


<WIDTH,U 


0395 E6 


C8 09 


04260 


LDB 


<AUTOY,U ACTUAL Y LOCATION 


048C Al 


03 


05410 


CMPA 


3,X 


0398 E3 


El 


04270 


ADDD 


.S-H- NEW Y POSITION 


048E 25 


10 


05420 


BLO 


OUTDOM 


039A ED 


8D 0607 


04280 


STD 


CACY,PCR STORE IT 


0490 A6 


C8 09 


05430 


LDA 


<AUT0Y,U IS TOP ROW BELOW BOTTOM 




039E 


04290 XMOVE 


EQII 


* 


0493 Al 


06 


05440 


CMPA 


6,X ROW OF DOMAIN? 


039E 6F 


8D 060B 


04300 


CLR 


FLG,PCR 


0495 22 


09 


05450 


BHI 


OUTDOM 


03A2 6F 
03A6 31 


8D 0608 
8D 05F9 


04310 
04320 


CLR 
LEAY 


1+FLC,PCR MARK FLAG TO CHECK X 
CACX.PCR ADDR. OF TENTATIVE X 


0497 AB 
049A Al 


C8 05 
04 


05460 
05470 


ADDA 
CMPA 


<HEIGHT,U IS BOTTOM ROW ABOVE TOP 
4,X ROW OF DOMAIN? 


03AA 17 


0524 


04330 


LBSR 


ACTOSC VERIFY X<0 OR X>255 


049C 25 


02 


05480 


BLO 


OUTDOM 


03AD 68 


8D 0608 


04340 


LSL 


1+STATUS.PCR PREPARE FOR Y STATUS FLAG 


049E C6 


01 


05490 


LDB 


#1 WELL, INDEED IT TOUCHES DOMAIN 


03B1 68 


8D 0604 


04350 


LSL 


1+STATUS.PCR 


04AO 4F 




05500 OUTDOM CLRA 




03B5 86 


40 


04360 


LDA 


#64 


04A1 ED 


8D 0513 


05510 


STD 


STATUS, PCR LET IT BE KNOWN 


03B7 A7 


8D 05F3 


04370 


STA 


1+FLG.PCR FLAG TO CKECK Y 


04A5 16 


04E8 


05520 


LBRA 


EXIT 


038B 31 


8D 05E6 


04380 


LEAY 


CACY,PCR ADDR. OF TENTATIVE Y 






05530 * 





_* 


03HF 17 


050F 


04390 


LBSR 


ACTOSC VERIFY Y<0 OR YM91 






05540 * OPERATE FIGURE (ACT. 6) * 


03C2 6D 


C8 02 


04400 


1ST 


<ORFLAG t U MOVE WITH MIX? 






05550 * ON ENTRY: X= 


= ADDR. OF * 


03C5 27 


in 


04410 


BEQ 


M03 NO 






05560 * 


PARMLIST * 


03G7 A6 


07 


04420 


LDA 


7,X IF MOVE WITH MIX 






05570 * 




^ 


03C9 A7 


8D 05E5 


04430 


STA 


BKCOLO,FCR STORE THE VALUE 




04A8 


05380 OPERA1 


EQU 


* 


03CD C6 


03 


04440 


LDB 


#3 COUNTER 


04A8 17 


039C 


05590 


LBSR 


GETFDT GET ADDR. OF FDT 




03CF 


04450 HO 2 


EQU 


* 


04AB 6D 


C8 02 


05600 


TST 


<ORFLAG,U MIXABLE? 


03CF 68 


8D 05DF 


04460 


ASL 


BKCOLO.PCR TO CONVERT 


04AE 27 


05 


05610 


BEQ 
LDD 


NOMIX 


03D3 68 


8D 05DB 


04470 


ASL 


BKCOLO,PCR COLOR CODE 


04B0 EC 


C8 02 


05620 


<ORFLAG,U 


03D7 AA 


8D 05D7 


04480 


ORA 


BKCOLO.PCR TO $00, $55, $AA OR $FF 


04B3 20 


16 


05630 


BRA 


MIXC 


03 DB 5A 




04490 


UECB 




04B5 6D 


C9 0011 


05640 NOMIX 


TST 


FLAGCR,U 


03DC 26 


Fl 


04500 


BNE 


MO 2 


04B9 26 


OD 


05650 


BNE 


NOMT2 


03DE A7 


8D 05D0 


04510 


STA 


BKCOLO.PCR 


04BB 86 


04 


05660 


LDA 


U 


03E2 17 


01A3 


04520 M03 


LBSR 


MOVGEN GO TO MOVE FIG. 


04BD A7 


8D 04E7 


05670 


STA 


ACTION, PCR 


03E5 16 


05A8 


04530 

04540 * 


LBRA 


EXIT 


04C1 34 
04C3 17 


10 
023A 


05680 


PS MS 


X 












05690 


LBSR 


SWAP2 






04550 * REMOVE FIGURE (ACT. 4) * 


04C6 35 


10 


05700 


PULS 


X 






04560 * ON ENTRY: X= 


ADDR. OF * 


04 C8 EC 


C8 00 


05710 NOMI2 


LDD 


<ASW,U GET ADDR. OF SWAP AREA 






04570 * 
04580 * 


PARMLIST * 


04CB 10AE C9 0012 


05720 MIXC 


LDY 


FIGBYT,U NUMBER OF BYTES IN FIG. 












04D0 34 


uti 


05730 


PSHS 


U,D 




03E8 


04590 REMOVE 


EQU 


* 


04D2 IF 


03 


05740 


TFR 


D,U GOODBYE ADDR. OF FDT 


03E8 17 


045C 


04600 


LBSR 


GETFDT GET FDT ADDRESS 


04D4 E6 


02 


05750 


LDB 


2,X OPERATOR 




03ES 


04610 REM0V2 


EQU 


* 


04D6 5A 




05760 


DECB 


IT'S EASIER TO EVALUATE OPERATOR 


03EB 17 


0312 


04620 


LBSR 


SWAP2 GO AND REMOVE 




04D7 


05770 OPLOP 


EQU 


* 


03EE 86 


01 


04630 


LDA 


#1 MARK AS NEW 


04 D7 A6 


C4 


05780 


LDA 


,U BYTE FROM SWAP 


03F0 A7 


C9 0011 


04640 


STA 


FLAGCR,U 


04D9 5D 




05790 


TSTB 


OPERATOR IS: 


03F4 16 


0599 


04650 

04660 *— 


LBRA 


EXIT 


04DA 2A 
04DC A6 


04 
03 


05800 


BPL 


NOCLR NOT CLEAR 












05810 


LDA 


3,X ELSE LOAD CLEAR BYTE 






04670 * COPY 


FIGURE (ACT. 5) * 


04DE 20 


OF 


05820 


BRA 


OPOLO TO COMMON EXECUTION 






04680 * ON ENTRY: X= 


ADDR. OF * 


04EO 26 


03 


05830 NOCLR 


BNE 


NONOT NOT A NOT OPERATION 






04690 * 
04700 * -" 


PARMLIST * 


04E2 43 
04E3 20 


OA 


05840 

05850 


COMA 


ELSE MAKE A NOT 












BRA 


OPOLO AND GET NEXT BYTE 




03F7 


04710 COPYFI 


F.QU 


* 


04E5 CI 


01 


05860 NONOT 


CMPB 


#1 IF 1 IS AND 


03F7 E6 


01 


04720 


LDB 


i,x 


04E7 26 


04 


05870 


BNE 


NOAND ELSE IS AN OR 


03F9 34 


04 


04730 


PSHS 


B 


04 E9 A4 


03 


05880 


ANDA 


3,X AND WITH MASK 


03 FB E6 


02 


04740 


LDB 


2,X GET ADDR. OF FFDT FOR FROM-FIG. 


04EB 20 


02 


05890 


BRA 


OPOLO AND CONTINUE 


03FD E7 


01 


04750 


STB 


1,X 


04 ED AA 


03 


05900 NO AND 


ORA 


3,X OR WITH MASK 


03FF 17 


0445 


04760 


LBSR 


GETFDT 




04EF 


05910 OPOLO 


EQU 


* HERE COME ALL OPTIONS 


0402 IF 


32 


04770 


TFR 


U,Y ADDR. OF FFDR 


04EF A7 


CO 


05920 


STA 


,U+ STORE NEW VALUE 


0404 35 


04 


04780 


PULS 


B GET TO -FIG 


04F1 31 


3F 


05930 


LEAY 


-1,Y NUMBER OF BYTES REACHED? 


0406 E7 


01 


04790 


STB 


1,X AND RESTORE 


04F3 26 


E2 


05940 


BNE 


OPLOP NO, CONTINUE 


0408 17 


043C 


04800 


LBSR 


GETFDT ADDR. OF FFDT FRO TO-FIG 


04F5 35 


46 


05950 


PULS 


U,D RESTORE ADDR. OF FFDT 


040B IF 


21 


04810 


TFR 


Y,X FFDT FOR FROM-FIG 


04F7 IF 


01 


05960 


TFR 


D,X 


O40D C6 


08 


04820 


LDB 


#XIC IF ERROR PREPARE ERROR CODE 


04F9 6D 


C8 02 


05970 


TST 


<ORFLAG,U MIXABLE? 


040F 10AE 


89 0012 


04830 


LDY 


FIGBYT,X NUMBER OF BYTES IN FIG. 


04FC 27 


16 


05980 


BEQ 


OPADO NO 


0414 10AC 


C9 0012 


04840 


CMPY 


FIGBYT.U IF MORE THAN DESTINATION 


04FE A6 


C8 14 


05990 


LDA 


<0WIU,U 


0419 1022 


0510 


04850 


LBHI 


ERROR 


0501 A7 


8D 049F 


06000 


STA 


CADX,PCR 


041D A6 


88 02 


04860 


LDA 


<ORFLAG,X IS FROM-FIG. ORABLE? 


0505 A6 


ca OC 


06010 


LDA 


<OLMASK,U GET ORIG. LMASK 


0420 Al 


C8 02 


04870 


CMPA 


<0RFLAG,U THEY MUST BE SAME CLASS 


0508 E6 


C8 OD 


06020 


LDB 


<ORMASK,U ORIG. RMASK 


0423 1026 


0506 


04880 


LBNE 


ERROR 


050B 6D 


C9 0014 


06030 


TST 


OWID.U 


0427 34 


50 


04890 


PSHS 


U,X 


050F 26 


16 


06040 


BNE 


OPADOA 


0429 4D 




04900 


TSTA 


IF FIGS ARE MIXABLE 


0511 5F 




06050 


CLRB 




042A 27 


08 


04910 


BEQ 


CO 2 NO 


0512 20 


13 


06060, 


BRA 


OPADOA 


042C EE 


C8 02 


04920 


LDU 


<ORFLAG,U DEST. 


0514 A6 


C8 OE 


06070 OPADO 


LDA 


<WIDBYT,U 


042F AE 


88 02 


04930 


LDX 


<ORFLAG,X ORIGIN 


0517 A7 


8D 0489 


06080 


STA 


CADX,PCR 


0432 20 


06 


04940 


BRA 


C022 


051B A6 


C8 OA 


06090 


LDA 


<LMASK,U 


0434 EE 


C8 00 


04950 C02 


LDU 


<ASW,U DESTINATION SWAP AREA 


051E E6 


C8 OB 


06100 


LDB 


<RMASK,U 


0437 AE 


88 00 


04960 


LDX 


<ASWyX ORIGIN SWAP AREA 


0521 6D 


C8 OE 


06U0 


TST 


<WIDBYT,U 


043A 17 


048B 


04970 C022 


LBSR 


COPYSW COPY AREAS 


0524 26 


01 


06120 


BNE 


OPADOA 


043D 35 


50 


04980 


PULS 


U,X RESTORE FFDT ADDRESSES 


0526 5F 




06130 


CLRB 




043F 32 


7C 


04990 


LEAS 


-4,S BUT KEEP IN STACK 


0527 43 




06140 OPADOA 


COMA 




0441 86 


14 


05000 


LDA 


#20 WE'LL COPY FFDT NOW 


0528 A7 


8D 0488 


06150 


STA 


AUX2,PCR 


0443 33 


44 


05010 


LEAU 


4,U EXCEPT FOR SWAP AREA ADDRESS 


052C 53 




06160 


COMB 


INVERT IT 


0445 30 


04 


05020 


LEAX 


4,X 


05 2D E7 


8D 047E 


06170 


STB 


AUX3,PCR 


0447 10AE 


81 


05030 C03 


LDY 


,X++ COPYING FFDT 


0531 17 


02FD 


06180 


LBSR 


NORMY GET #ROWS IN FIG. 


044A 10AF 


CI 


05040 


STY 


,U++ 


0534 IF 


12 


06190 OPAD1 


TFR 


X,Y 


044D 4A 




05050 


DECA 




0536 E6 


C8 OF 


06200 


LDB 


<MAXBYT,U MAX. WIDTH IN BYTES 


04 4E 26 


F7 


05060 


BNE 


C03 IF NOT FINISHED CONTINUE 


0539 3A 




06210 


ABX 




0450 35 


50 


05070 


PULS 


U,X RESTORE FFDT ADDRESSES 


053A AF 


8D 0472 


06220 


STX 


AUX4,PCR 


0452 6F 


C9 0011 
0456 


05080 
05090 EXCOP 


CLR 

EQU 


FLAGCR,U FLAG AS NEW 

* 


053E IF 
0540 A6 


21 
84 


06230 
06240 


TFR 

LDA 


Y,X RESTORE ADDR. OF LEFT BYTE OF LINE 

,x 


0456 16 


0537 


05100 


LBRA 


EXIT THAT'S IT 


0542 A4 


8D 046E 


06250 


ANDA 


AUX2,PCR 












0546 A7 


84 


06260 


STA 


jX 






05120 * VERIFY IF FIGURE INSIDE* 


0548 E6 


8D 0458 


06270 


LDB 


GADX,PCR 






05130 * AN SPECIFIED 


DOMAIN * 


054C 3A 




06280 


ABX 


POINT TO RIGHTMOST BYTE 






05140 * ON ENTRY: X"" 


ADDR. OF * 


054D A6 


84 


06290 


LDA 


,X GET THE RIGHTMOST BYTE 






05150 * 


PARMLIST * 


054F A4 


8D 045C 


06300 


ANDA 


AUX3,PCR ZEROES PROPAGATION 






UjIoU •*— — ■*-•-*■- 






0553 A7 


80 


06310 


STA 


,X+ AND PUT BACK 




0459 


05170 DOMAIN 


EQU 


* 


0555 AC 


8D 0457 


06320 0PAD2 


CMPX 


AUX4,PCR ADDITIONAL BYTES TO CLEAR? 


0459 A6 


02 


05180 


LDA 


2,X IS DOMAIN DIRECTLY GIVEN? 


0559 24 


04 


P6330 


BUS 


OPAD3 NO 


045B 27 


21 


05190 


BEQ 


DOM2 YES 


055B 6F 


80 


06340 


CLR 


,X+ CLEAR 


045D E6 


01 


05200 


LDB 


1,X NO, DOMAIN BELONGS TO A FIG. 


055D 20 


F6 


06350 


BRA 


OPAD2 


045F 34 
0461 A7 
0463 17 
0466 35 
0468 E7 
046A A6 
046D A7 
046F AB 
0472 A7 
0474 A6 
0477 A7 


04 
01 

03E1 
04 
01 

S C8 08 
03 

C8 04 
05 

C8 09 
04 


05210 
05220 
05230 
05240 
05250 
05260 
05270 
05280 
05290 
05300 
05310 


PSJIS 

STA 

LBSR 

PULS 

STB 

LDA 

STA 

ADDA 

STA 

LDA 

STA 


B GET FFDT FOR THAT FIG. 

1,X 

GETFDT 

B RESTORE FIG. NUMBER 

1,X 

<AUTOX,U LEFT COL, OF DOMAIN 

3,X 

<WIDTH,U RIGHT COL. OF DOMAIN 

5,X 

<AUTOY,U TOP ROW OF DOMAIN 

4,X 


055F 6A 
0563 26 
0565 A6 

0569 81 
056B 1026 
056F 4A 

0570 A7 
0574 A6 
0577 A7 
057B A6 
057E A7 


8D 0448 

CF 

8D 043F 

04 

042] 

8D 0434 
C8 08 
8D 0429 
C8 09 
8D 0424 


06360 0PAD3 
06370 
06380 
06390 

06400 
06410 
06420 

06430 
06440 
06450 
06460 


DEC 

BNE 

LDA 

CMPA 

LBNE 

DECA 

STA 

LDA 

STA 

LDA 

STA 


ROWS, PCR MORE ROWS TO ADJUST? 
0PAD1 YES 
ACTION, PCR 

u 

EXIT 

ACTION, PCR 

<AUTOX,U 

CADX.PCR 

<AUTOY,U 

CADY,FCR 




















June 1985 THE RAINBOW 73 



0582 17 
0585 16 



0003 
0408 



0588 9E 
058A 109E 
058D OF 
058F OF 
0591 34 
0593 A6 
0597 E6 
059B 17 
059E 34 
05A0 A6 
05A3 6D 
05A6 26 
05A8 A6 
05AB A7 
05AF 35 
05B1 10AE 
05B6 108C 
05BA 26 
05BC 34 
05BE 17 
05C1 35 
05C3 108E 

05C7 AF 
05CA A7 
05CD E7 
05D0 E6 
05D4 E7 
05D7 CI 
05D9 26 
05DB A6 
05DE 108C 
05E2 27 
05E4 IF 
05E6 4F 
05E7 5D 
05E8 26 
05EA 86 
05EC 20 
05EE 54 
05EF 25 
05F1 4A 
05F2 20 
05F4 E6 
05F8 5D 
05F9 26 
05FB 8B 
05FD 20 
05FF 54 



0588 

BD 

BF 

BD 

BF 

30 

8D 040D 

8D 040B 

008A 

02 

C8 OA 

C8 OE 

03 

C8 QB 

8D 0400 

02 

8D 03F1 

0002 

OB 

16 

013F 

16 

0000 

05C7 

C8 06 

C8 OA 

C8 OB 

8D 03D8 

C8 OE 

00 

03 

C8 OB 

0001 

2A 

89 



04 
F8 
06 

03 

FA 

8D 03B7 



06470 
06480 
06490 
0650(1 
06510 
06520 
06530 
06540 
06550 
06560 
06570 
06580 
06590 
06600 
06610 
06620 
06630 
06640 
06650 
06660 
06670 
06680 
06690 
06700 
06710 
06720 
06730 
06740 
06750 
06760 
06770 
06780 
06790 
06800 
06810 
06820 
06030 
06840 
06050 
06860 
06870 
0688Q 
06890 
06900 
06910 
06920 
06930 
06940 
06950 
06960 
06970 
06980 
06990 
07000 
07010 



LBSR 
LBRA 



MOVGEN 

EXIT NO, TERMINATE 



♦SUBROUTINE TO MOVE AN OBJECT IN THE SCREEN 



SKO 



MOVGEN EQU 
LDX 
LDY 
CLR 
CLR 
PSHS 
LDA 
LDB 
LBSR 

psns 

LDA 

TST 

BNE 

LDA 

STA 

PULS 

LDY 

CMPY 

BNE 

PS1IS 

LBSR 

PULS 

LDY 

EQU 

STX 

STA 

STB 

LDB 

STB 

CMPB 

BNE 

LDA 

CMPY 

BEQ 

TFR 

CLRA 

TSTB 

BNE 

LDA 

BRA 

COUNT 1 LSRB 
BCS 
DECA 
BRA 

D0NF1 LDB 
TSTB 
BNE 
ADDA 
BRA 

COUNT2 LSRB 



<$BD GET X COORD. 

<$BF GET Y COORD. 

<$BD CLEAR 

<$BF CLEAR 

X,Y 

CADX,PCR GET COORD X OF DESTINATION 

CADY.PCR GET COORD. Y OF DESTINATION 

CONVER GET ADDR. OF TOP CORNER 

A 

<LMASK,U 

<WIDBYT,U 

SKO 

<RHASK,U 

AUX3,PCR 



ACTI02.PCR 

#2 

SKI 

X t A,B 

SWAP 2 

X,A,B 

#0 



SWAP FROM BLOCK 
FIRST GET 



SKI 



SKIP2 



<FIGCAD,U 

<LMASK,U 

<RMASK,U 

AUX,PCR NEW WIDTH 

<WIDBYT,U 

SKIP2 

<RMASK,U 

#1 

RETGEN 

A,B 



COUNTl 
DONE1 



SEE IF B=0 
NO 

COUNT IS NOT NECESSARY 
LOOP UNTIL 
IT FINDS 
FIRST 1 

GET OLD MASK 



0600 
0602 
0603 

0605 
0606 
0608 
060B 
060E 
0610 
0614 
0618 
06 IB 
061F 
0622 
0624 
0627 



25 
4C 
20 

4D 

27 

17 

17 

35 

6F 

A6 

A7 

A6 

A7 

9F 

109F 

39 



FA 
0605 

03 

01BE 

0080 

30 

8D 039B 

8D Q38C 

C8 08 

80 0387 

C8 09 

BD 

BF 



07020 BCS 

07030 INCA 

07040 BRA 

07050 DONE2 EQU 

07060 TSTA 

07070 BEQ 

07080 LBSR 

07090 GOSWAP LBSR 

07100 RETGEN PULS 



IT FINDS 
FIRST 1 



IF NO SHIFT REQUIRED 

GO TO SWAP 

GO TO SHIFT AS REQUIRED 

PLACE FIGURE IN DEST. 

RESTORE 




0628 34 
06 2 A 17 
062D 35 
062F 5F 
0630 8D 
0632 34 
0634 A6 
0638 AB 
063B 34 
063D E6 
0641 17 
0644 IF 
0646 A3 
0648 35 
064A E7 
064E C6 
0650 8D 
0652 6D 
0656 26 
0658 EA 
065A IF 
065C 35 
065E 20 
0660 35 
0662 39 



40 
OOBD 

40 

31 

02 

8D 036C 

C8 04 

52 

8D 0365 

00A6 

10 

61 

52 

8D 035E 

01 

11 

8D 0356 

08 

E4 

98 

04 

02 

02 



GOSWAP 

SHIFT 

SWAP 

X,Y 

07110 CLR AUX3,PCR 

07120 LDA CADX.PCR NEW X-CDORD 
07130 STA <AUTOX,U 

07140 LDA CADY,PCR NEW Y-COORD 
07150 STA <AUTOY,U 
07160 STX <$BD ORIGINAL COLUMN 
07170 STY <$BF AND ROW 
07180 RTS RETURN 

07190 *** SUBROUTINE TO GET ADDRESS OF AN SPECIFIC XY COORD. 
07200 *** ENTRY: U" ADDRESS OF FIG. DESCRIPTOR BLOCK 
07210 *** A=> X COORDINATE OF FIGURE 
07220 *** B= Y COORDINATE OF FIGURE 
07230 *** EXITi X" ADDRESS OF UPER/LEFT CORNER 
07240 *** A= BITS MASK TO ADJUST LEFT BORDER 
07250 *** B= BITS MASK TO ADJUST RIGHT BORDER 
07260 *** AUX«WlDTH IN BYTES 
07270 CONVER PSHS U 
07280 LBSR NORM GET ADDRESS 

U RESTORE U 

GET LEFT MASK 

SETBND 



07290 
07300 
07310 
07320 

07330 
07340 
07350 
07360 
07370 
07380 
07390 
07400 
07410 
07420 
07430 
07440 
07450 
0/460 
07470 
07480 
07490 
07500 OUTCON 



PSHS 

LBSR 

PULS 

CLRB 

BSR 

PSHS 

LDA 

ADDA 

PSHS 

LDB 

LBSR 

TFR 

SUED 

PULS 

STB 

LDB 

BSR 

TST 

BNE 

ORB 

TFR 

PULS 

BRA 

PULS 



CADX.PCR GET COLUMN 

<WIDTH,U PLUS NUMBER OF COLS 

A,X,U 

CADY.PCR GET ROW 

NORM GET ADDRESS OF RIGHT COL. 

X,D PREPARE TO SUBTRACT 

1,S #FYTES BETWEEN RIGHT AND LEFT COLS 

A,X,U RESTORE 

AUX,PCR SAVE WIDTH IN BYTES 

#1 PREPARE TO OBTAIN RIGHT MASK 

SETBND GET RMASK 

AUX,PCR IF. WIDTH NO MORE THAN 1 BYTE 

OUTCON 

,S ONLY ONE MASK 

B.A 



ENDGON 

A GET LEFT MASK 
07510 ENDCON RTS 
07520 ***HERE THE BYTE BOUNDARY IS ADJUSTED TO BIT BOUNDARY 





0663 


07530 


SETBND 


EQU 


* 




0663 96 


B6 


07540 




LDA 


<$B6 


GET PMODE 


0665 84 


01 


07550 




ANDA 


#1 


IF NOT PMODE 1 OR 3 


0667 27 


02 


07560 




BEQ 


SET2 


DO NOTHING 


Q669 08 


BE 


07570 




LSL 


<$BE 


ELSE MULTIPLY END COL, Bl 


066B 96 


BE 


07580 


SET 2 


LDA 


<$BE 


GET COLUMN 


066D 84 


07 


07590 




ANDA 


#$07 


NUMBER OF BITS 


066F 31 


3D 0013 


07600 




LEAY 


>MASTAB 


,PCR CONVERSION TABLE 


0673 A6 


A6 


07610 




LDA 


A,Y 


DISPLACEMENT 


0675 5D 




07620 




TSTB 




FLAG ON? 


0676 26 


01 


07630 




BNE 


RISIDE 


YES. RIGHT BORDER 


0678 39 




07640 




RTS 








0679 


07650 


RISIDE 


EQU 


* 




0679 4D 




07660 




TSTA 




IF RMASK=FF 


067A 26 


06 


07670 




BNE 


RI2 


YES 


067C 86 


FF 


07680 




LDA 


fl$FF 




067E 6A 


8D 032A 


07690 




DEC 


AUX.PCR WIDTH IS ONE BYTE LESS 


0682 43 




07700 RI2 


COMA 






0683 IF 


89 


07710 




TFR 


A,B 




0685 39 




07720 




RTS 






0686 


00 


07730 


MASTAB 


FCB 


$00 




0687 


80 


07740 




FCB 


$80 




0688 


CO 


07750 




FCB 


$C0 




0689 


EO 


07760 




FCB 


$E0 




068A 


FO 


07770 




FCB 


$F0 




068D 


F8 


07780 




FCB 


$F8 




068C 


FC 


07790 




FCB 


$FC 




0G8D 


FE 


07800 




FCB 


$FE 





07810 * SWAP: 

07820 *** MOVE A FIGURE FROM SCREEN TQ A RESERVED AREA AND 

07830 *** THE FIGURE FROM THE RESERVED AREA TO SCREEN 

07840 * ON ENTRY: U- ADDRESS OF FDT 

07850 * ON EXIT; SWAP PERFORMED 

07860 * EXCEPT FOR ,U NO REGS ARE PRESERVED 





068E 


07870 SWAP 


EQU 


* 




068E 10AE 


C8 00 


07880 




LDY 


<ASW,U 


ADDR. OF SWAP AREA 


0692 AE 


C8 06 


07890 




LDX 


<FIGCAD 


U ADDRESS IN SCREEN 


0695 17 


0199 


07900 




LBSR 


NORMY 




0698 4F 




07910 MORE1 


CLRA 






0699 E6 


86 


0792Q 




LDB 


A,X 


FIRST BYTE FROM ROW 


069B 34 


04 


07930 




PSHS 


B 




069D E4 


C8 OA 


07940 




ANDB 


<LMASK,U PREPARE IT TO MIX 


06A0 EA 


A6 


07950 




ORB 


A,Y 




06A2 20 


06 


07960 




BRA 


MORCOM 


CONTINUE SWAPING ROW 


06A4 E6 


86 


07970 


MORE2 


LDB 


A,X 


INTERMIDIATE ROW BYTE 


06A6 34 


04 


07980 




PSHS 


B 




06AQ E6 


A6 


07990 




LDB 


A,Y 


BTE FROM SWAP 




06AA 


08000 


MORCOH 


EQU 


* 




06AA 34 


02 


08010 




PSHS 


A 




06AC 6D 


C8 02 


08020 




TST 


<ORFLAG 


,U MIXABLE? 


06AF 27 


OF 


08030 




BEQ 


NOOR 


NO 


Q6B1 96 


B6 


08040 




LDA 


<$B6 


IS PMODE 1 OR 3? 


06B3 84 


01 


0805O 




ANDA 


#1 




06B5 27 


07 


08060 




BEQ 


ORTWO 


NO 


06B7 A6 


61 


08070 




LDA 


l.S 


BYTE FROM SCREEN 


06B9 17 


OOCE 


08080 




LBSR 


ORFIG 


PERFORM "OR" 


06BC 20 


02 


08090 




BRA 


NOOR 


RESUME 


06BE EA 


61 


08100 


ORTWO 


ORB 


l.S 


NORMAL OR OPERATION 


06C0 35 


02 


08110 


NOOR 


PULS 


A 


RESTORE A 


06C2 E7 


86 


08120 




STB 


A,X 


STORE ON SCREEN 


06C4 35 


04 


08130 




PULS 


B 


GET BYTE FROM SCREEN 


06C6 E7 


A6 


08140 




STB 


A,Y 


STORE IT IN SWAP 


06C8 4C 




08150 




INCA 




A-A+l 


06C9 Al 


C8 OE 


08160 




CMPA 


<WIDBYT,U A-WIDTH IN BYTES? 


06CC 22 


OD 


08170 




BHI 


ENDCOL 





74 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



06CE 25 
06D0 E6 
06D2 34 
06D4 E4 
06 D7 EA 
06D9 20 
06DB D6 
06DD 3A 
06DE E6 
06E1 31 
06E3 6A 
06E7 22 
06E9 39 



06EA 97 
06EC D7 
06EE 9b 
06F0 81 
06P2 27 
06F4 04 
06F6 81 
06F8 22 
06FA 04 
06FC W 
06FF 39 



D4 

86 

04 

C8 i 

A6 

CF 

B9 



BE 
CO 

B6 
04 
08 
BE 
01 
02 
CO 
9298 



0700 10AE 
0704 AE 
0707 17 
070k 63 
070D 63 

0710 4F 

0711 E6 
0713 E4 
0716 20 
0718 E6 
071A 34 
071C E6 
0720 CI 
0722 27 
0724 E6 
0726 E7 
0728 35 
072A E7 
072C 4C 
072D Al 
0730 22 



0700 
C8 00 
C8 06 
0127 
C8 OA 
C8 Ob 

86 

C8 OA 

02 

86 

04 

8D 0288 

01 

04 

A6 

86 

04 



C8 OE 

09 



08180 
08190 
08200 
08210 
08220 
08230 
08240 
08250 
08260 
08270 
08280 
08290 
08300 
08310 
08320 
08330 
08340 
08350 
08360 
08370 
08380 
08390 
08400 
004 10 
08420 
08430 
08440 
08450 
08460 
08470 
08480 
08490 
08500 
08510 
08520 
08530 
08540 
08550 
08560 
08570 
08580 
08590 
08600 
08610 
08620 
08630 
08640 
08650 
08660 
08670 
08680 
08690 
08700 
08710 
08720 



M0RE2 
A,X 



BLO 

LDB 

PSHS fl 

ANDB 

ORB 

BRA 
ENDCOL LDB 

ABX 

LDB 

LEAY 

DEC 

BHI 

RTS 
*** NORMALIZE X,Y COORDINATES 
*** ON ENTRY; A=X COORD, B=Y COORD 



PROCESS .RIGHTMOST BYTE 



MIX IT WITH BYTE PROM SWAP 



<RMASK,U 

A,Y 

MORCOM TO NORMAL PROCESS 

<$B9 NUMBER OF BYTE FOR ROW 

ADD TO X 
<MAXBYT,U BYTES PER ROW 
B,Y ADD TO Y 
ROWS, PCR #ROWS-l 
M0RE1 IF NOT ZERO CONTINUE 



NORM 



ENNORM 



ST A 

STB 

LDA 

CMPA 

BEQ 

LSR 

CMPA 

BUI 

LSR 

JSR 

RTS 



<$BE 

<$C0 

<$B6 

#4 

ENNORM 

<$BE 

#1 

ENNORM 

<$C0 

$9298 



X-COORD. 
Y-^COORD. 
GET PMODE 
PMODE 4 OUT 

DIVIDE X BY 2 
PMODE >1 

DIVIDE Y BY 2 

TO ROM GET ADDRESS 



* SWAP2: 

*** MOVE A FIGURE FROM SCREEN TO A RESERVED AREA AND 
*** THE FIGURE FROM THE RESERVED AREA TO SCREEN 

* DOES NOT CHECK FOR OR OPERATIONS. (FAST MODE) 

* ON ENTRY: U= ADDRESS OF FDT 

* ON EXIT: SWAP PERFORMED 

* EXCEPT FOR U NO REGS ARE PRESERVED 
SWAP2 EQU * 

<ASW,U ADDR. OF SWAP AREA 

<FIGCAD,U ADDRESS IN SCREEN 

NORMY 

<LMASK,U 

<RMASK,U 



MORE21 



MORE20 
M0RC02 



LDY 

LDX 

LBSR 

COM 

COM 

CLRA 

LDB 

ANDB 

BRA 

LDB 

PSIIS 

LDB 

CMPB 

BEQ 

LDB 

STB 

PULS 

STB 

INCA 

CMPA 

BHI 



A,X FIRST BYTE FROM ROW 
<LMASK,U CUR BITS AT LEFT 
MORC02 CONTINUE SWAPING ROW 
A,X INTERMIDIATE ROW BYTE 



ACTION, PCR 

#1 YES 

COMX 

A,Y 

A,X 



CREATE FIG? 



GET BYTE IN SWAP 
PUT IN SCREEN 



A,Y SAVE IN SWAP 
A-A+l 

<WIDBYT,U A-WIDTH IN BYTES? 
F.NDC02 



0732 25 
0734 E6 
0736 E4 
0739 20 
073B D6 
073D 30 
073F E6 
0742 31 
0744 6A 
0748 22 
074A 63 
074D 63 
0750 6D 
0753 27 
0755 A£ 
0758 A6 
075C 81 
075E 27 
0760 A6 
0763 6D 
0767 26 

0769 A6 
076C A7 

0770 10AE 
0775 34 
0777 EE 
077A A6 
077E 81 
0780 26 
0782 IE 
0784 17 
0787 35 

0789 39 



E4 

86 

C8 OB 

DF 

B9 

85 

C8 OF 

A5 

8D 0263 

C6. 

C8 OA 

C8 OB 

C8 02 

34 

C8 02 

8D 024C 

01 

10 

C8 OC 

C9 0014 

03 

C8 OD 

3D 023F 

0770 

C9 0012 

40 

C8 00 

8D 022A 

01 

02 

31 

0141 

40 

0789 



08730 
08740 
08750 
08760 
08770 
08780 
08790 
08800 
08810 
08820 
08830 
08840 
08850 
08860 
08870 



OR-ABLE? 
.NO GET OUT 



078A 34 
078C 86 
078E 6F 
0792 A7 
0796 A6 
0798 A4 
079C E6 
07AO E4 
07A4 34 
07A6 Al 
07A8 26 
07AA A6 
07AC A4 



078A 

06 

CO 

8D 0217 

8D 0214 

61 

8D 020E 

8D 0212 

8D 0206 

04 

EO 

06 

E4 

8D 01FA 



08890 
08900 
08910 
08920 
08930 
08940 
08950 
08960 
08970 
08980 
08990 
09000 
09010 
09020 
09030 
09040 
09050 
09060 
09070 
09080 
09090 
09100 
09110 
09120 
09130 
09140 
09150 
09160 
09170 
09180 
09190 
09200 
09210 
09220 
09230 
09240 
09250 
09260 
09270 
09280 



BLO 
LDB 
ANDB 
BRA 
ENDC02 LDB 
LEAX 
LDB 
LEAY 
DEC 
BHI 
COM 
COM 
TST 
BEQ 
LDX 
LDA 
CMPA 
BEQ 
LDA 
TST 
BNE 
LDA 
STA 
EQU 
I.DY-. 
PSHS 
LDU 
LDA 
CMPA 
BNE 
EXG 
LBSR 
PULS 
EQU 
RTS 

* ORFIG. DETERMINES IF PIECE OF FIGURE ON 

* SCREEN SHOULD BE LEFT 

* ON ENTRY: A- BYTE FROM SCREEN 

* B= BYTE FROM SWAP 

* U- ADDR. OF FDT 

* ON EXIT: B- ADJUSTED SWAP BYTE 

* REGS A AND B ARE NOT PRESERVED 
ORFIG EQU * 

A,B 

#$C0 FIRST TWO BITS TO CHECK 

RESB.PCR CLEAR. RESULT BYTE 

BITAN,PCR 

1,S GET BYTE FROM SWAP 

BITAN,PCR SUPRESS UNWANTED BITS 

BKCOLO,PCR GET COLOR TO BE 'ORED* 

BITAN.PCR REMOVE UNWANTED BITS 



NORK 
ENSW2 



ENSW3 



ENSWX 



MORE20 

A,X PROCESS RIGHTMOST BYTE 

<RMASK,U MIX IT WITH BYTE FROM SWAP 

MORC02 TO NORMAL PROCESS 

<$B9 NUMBER OF BYTE FOR ROW 

B } X ADD TO X 

<MAXBYT,U BYTES PER ROW 

R,Y ADD TO Y 

ROWS, PCR MOWS-I 

MORE21 IF NOT ZERO CONTINUE 

<LMASK,U 

<RMASK,U 

<ORFLAG,U 

ENSWX 

<ORFLAG , U 

ACTION ,PCR CREATE FIGURE7 

til IF YES GET-OUT 

ENSW2 

<OLMASK,U RESTORE ORIG. LMASK 

OWID.U 

NORK 

<ORMASK,U 

AUX3,FCR 

* 

FIGBYT,U 

U 

<ASW,U GET TO-ADDRESS 

ACTION, PCK CURRENT OPTION 



ENSW3 



COPYSW 
U 



IF NOT CREATE 

GO AHEAD 

ELSE COPY FROM FIRST AREA TO SECOND 

COPY AREAS 

RESTORE U 



OR1 



PSHS 
LDA 

CLR 

ST A 

LDA 

ANDA 

LDB 

ANDB 

PSHS 

CMPA 

BNE 

LDA 

ANDA 



,S+ BAKGROUND COLOR IN SWAP? 
OR2 NO 

,S GET BYTE FROM SCREEN 
BITAN.PCR SUPRESS UNWANTED BITS 



XPNDR2 

for the CoCo 
DISK SYSTEM 




XPNDR2 $39.95 each or 2/$76 
This prototype card features a 40 pin 
connector for projects requiring an on- 
line disk system or ROM paks. The 
CoCo signals are brought out to wire- 
wrap pins. Special gold plated spring 
clips provide reliable and noisefree 
disk operation plus solid support for 
vertical mounting of the controller. The 
entire 4.3*7 inch card is drilled for ICs. 
Assembled, tested and ready to run. 

XPNDR1 $19.95 each or 2/$36 
A rugged 4.3*6.2 inch bare breadboard 
that brings the CoCo signals out to 
labeled pads. Both XPNDR cards are 
double-sided glass/epoxy, have gold 
plated edge connectors, thru-hole 
plating and are designed with heavy 
power and ground buses. They're 
drilled for standard 0.3 and 0.6 inch 
wide dual in-line wirewrap sockets; 
with a 0.1 inch grid on the outboard end 
for connectors. 

SuperGuide $3.95 each 
Here is *a unique plastic insert that 
aligns and supports printed circuit 
cards in the CoCo cartridge port. Don't 
forget to ORDER ONE FOR YOUR 
XPNDR CARDS 



Included with each XPNDR card 
are .8 pages of APPLICATION 
NOTES to help you learn about 
chips and how to connect them to 
your CoCo. 



To order or for technical informa- 
tion call: 

(206) 782-6809 

weekdays 8 a.m. to noon 
We pay shipping on prepaid orders. 
For immediate shipment send 
check, money order or the number 
and expiration date of your VISA or 
MASTERCARD to: 



ROBOTIC> T <MICROSYSTEMS 

BOX 30807 SEATTLE, WA 98103 



Formaker 

the fastest, most complete 
office package yet! 

Totally Menu Driven 

Customize with company information 

Complete "on screen instructions 



FORMS 


STORES 


FIGURES 




letter 


complete forms 


quantity 


invoice 


item list 


list 


quote 


subquotes 


net 


purchase order 


letters 


discount 


mail order 


footnotes 


subtotals 


confirm order 


customer info 


tax 


receipt 




freight, etc. 


SEPARATE CONFIGURE 




PROGRAM 




PRINTS 


for company info 




form feed 


printer options 




letterhead 


quote"& inv. # 




envelope 


w/auto sequencing 




multiple copy 


auto date 




emphasized 






WATCH FOR OUR NEW SOFTWARE 








C4«f#«A#3ha»A 


tAA 37 


Kriis 



42 4th Street 

Pennsburg, PA 18073 

Or Call (215) 679-8792 (Evenings) 



send for more information 



June 1985 



THE RAINBOW 75 




tware 



COLOR DISK 
MANAGER 



Color Disk Manager will do selective initializations, verifies, 
backups, repairs and much more! 

• will initialize single tracks, a range of tracks, or the entire disk to 
more than 35 tracks 

• allows you to make a backup of the directory out of reach of basic 
and put it back if a directory crash occurs; has a recover file command 
which will load entire files off the disk if the directory crashes and the 
allocation table is good; will repair or salvage crashed disk several 
ways 

• is 64K compatible allowing a 64K backup; does backups by track, 
a range of tracks, or the whole disk (will do more than 35 tracks) 

• gives an allocation table map with granules x-referenced to tracks 
and sectors, and showing which granules are used; displays a file 
granule map showing which granules, tracks, and sectors the file 
uses, and the length 

• will do a directory displaying file names in two columns, the num- 
ber of free granules, and the free bytes if below 65535; has a kill file 
command 

• loads and saves, sectors, tracks or files; loads files two ways, as 
done by basic, or with header bytes left in, which helps in studying how 
files are saved on disk; has an append sector command 

• verifies tracks or the entire disk showing the track and sector if an 
error occurs, with the option of continue or stop 

• is multiple drive compatible 

• allows you to save a block of memory to disk; transfers programs 
from tape to disk 

• has a rapid scan feature which allows you to scan the disk by 
tracks and sectors using the arrow keys 

• will dump memory to the screen in ascii, good for listing basic 
programs or source files; has a move memory block command, and a 
transfer control command 

• converts decimal to hex or hex to decimal 

• allows you to examine memory using the arrow keys with displays 
in hex (or decimal) and ascii 

• will load and execute rompac's saved on disk; has a move rom to 
ram command 

• allows you to change origin (start addr.) of ML programs; displays 
the start, end, and execute addresses of ML programs 

• 32K - 64K ECB $34.95 Disk 



RAINBOW 
SCREEN MACHINE 

• Add these features to your computer/program: ML extension of 
Basic loads on top of 16, 32, or 64K machines to enable easy mixture 
of hi-res graphics and text in your programs. Dense text or large 
lettering for children, visually impaired or VCR title screens with ho 
programming! 

• User definable 224 character set featuring lower case de- 
scenders, Greek, cars, tank, planes, etc., completely interfaced with 
all keys, commands, and PMODES. 1 2 sizes (most colored) from 1 6 
x 8 to 64 x 24. PRINT (a , TAB and comma fields are fully sup- 
ported. 

• 2 distinct character sets automatically switch for sharpest lettering 
featuring underline, subscript, superscript, reverse video, top 
and bottom scroll protect, double width, colored characters in 
PMODE 4, and help screen. 

• Simple 2-letter abbreviated commands inside your program or 
control key entry from keyboard, even during program execution! 

• Includes demo program, character generator program and man- 
ual. 1 6K Basic required — 32K recommended. $29.95 Tape; $32.95 
Disk. 



COLOR TAPE 
MANAGER 

• merges multiple basic programs into one; appends multiple ma- 
chine language programs into one; appends machine language to 
basic (example included) 

• converts numbers from hex to decimal or decimal to hex; allows 
input in hex or decimal 

• rapidly scans memory using the arrow keys with auto-key repeat 

• displays memory in hex (or decimal) and ascii; allows the changing 
of memory in decimal or hex 

• deals with missing end of file blocks; loads and saves data with or 
without a filename block 

• handles programs with varying block lengths 

• displays the start, end, and execute addresses of ML programs; 
displays the buffer start, end and top addresses 

• converts ML programs into basic data statements which can be 
loaded as, or merged with, a basic program 

• turns the audio and cassette motor on and off with one key com- 
mands; has inverted displays which lessen eye fatigue 

• finds the end of programs on tape even from within a program with 
a skip file command; allows the transferring of control to other pro- 
grams with a go command 

• moves blocks of memory from start through end address to new 
start address; allows the changing of the origin (start adds) or ML 
programs 

• has an 8,380 byte loading buffer with 16K systems and 24,760 
byte loading buffer with 32K systems 

• 16K ECB mimimum $19.95 Tape $22.95 Disk 



SUPER 

SCREEN MACHINE 

All of the features of Screen Machine and more: 

• Variable SMOOTH Scroll for professional displays, listings, busi- 
riQss use 

• Variable volume KEY Click (tactile feedback). 

• EDTASM+ command for instant compatibility with cartridge 
EDTASM. 

• Superpatch - command for instant compatibility with the 
Superpatch + Editor- Assembler. 

• True Break key disable and recognition. 

• 1 User Definable commands used to activate your special drivers 
or subroutine. 

• Dynamic Screen Dump command for use with Custom Software, 
Engineering's Graphic Screen Print program for simple printer "Snap- 
shots" of your screen even during program execution! 

• Super Screen Machine - $44.95 Tape; $47.95 Disk. 



Screen Machine can be used in games, word processors, utilities, etc. 
in addition, the custom graphics characters can be used to develop 
easy, effective hi-res character-graphics programs. The potential is 
truly unlimited. 

Screen Machine is fully interfaced with all keys and commands. 
Although some Basic programming knowledge is recommended just 
a few minutes spent studying and referencing your computer's Basic 
manuals will turn you on to the power of computing with Screen 
Machine. 

Screen Machine can be used to directly create video recorder title 
screens or large lettering for children or the visually impaired simply by 
typing. 



Dealer and author inquiries are al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kelly Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 11932, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (403) 
421-8003. 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS only. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

2153 Leah Lane 

Revnoldsburg, Ohio 43068 

(614)861-0565 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Add 81.50 per tape for postage and 
handling. Ohioans add 5.5% sales tax. 
COD orders are welcome. CIS orders 
EMAIL to 70405, 1374. No refunds or 
exchanges. 



—~ 




VISA 




ar. 



f twQfC 32K Disk ' $29>95 each 

SPORTS STATISTICS 
PACKAGES 

Statistics programs for the coach, team manager, or avid fan 
who wants to keep accurate team and opponent records. 
Menu-driven and easy to use. Put your team in the CoCo with 
Sugar Software's Sports Statistic Packages! 

Soccer will provide: 



► Mid-season entry, update 
and additions 

> Correct and review all stats 
in file 

► Correction on all input 
screens 

> Raw dump of data to the 
printer — for the player, goalie, and opposing team's files 
Summary of the player, goalie, and opposing team's stats 
Track 20 individual player stats 

Summarizes 16 individual player stats 
Track 14 goalie stats 
Summarize 10 goalie stats 
Track 19 opposing team stats 






Baseball will provide: 

• Mid-season entry, update 
and additions 

• Correct and review all stats 
in file 

• Correction on all input 
screens 

• Raw dump of data to the 
printer — for the player, pitcher, and apposing team s files 
Summary of the player, pitcher and opposing team's stats 
Track 21 individual player stats with 18 cum stats per player 
Track 15 individual pitcher stats with 1 1 cum totals per pitcher 
Compile total team summary of 16 separate stats 

Compile total pitching summary of 1 1 stats 

Track 15 opposing team stats with 14 cummed stats 



Cental Property 

Inccme and Expense 

Management 

Package 



Football will provide: 

• Mid-season entry, update 
and additions 

• Correct and review all stats 
in file 

• Correction on all input 
screens 

. . , • Raw dump of data to the 

printer — for the player and opposing team's files 
Summary of the player and opposing team's stats 
Track 90 individual player stats 
Summarizes 63 individual cum stats per player 
Summarize 17 cum team stats 
Summarize 28 cum opposing team stats 
Team summaries of 87 stats 

Comparative summary printouts 63 stats for your team 
Comparative summary printouts 62 stats for opposing team 
Over 350 possible stats! 



Basketball will provide: 

• Mid-season entry, update 
and additions 

• Correct and review all stats 
in file 

• Correction on all input 
screens 

• Raw dump of data to the 
printer — for the player and opposing team's files 
Summary of the player and opposing team's stats 

Track 22 individual player stats with 18 cum stats per player 

Summarizes 17 individual player team stats 

Compile opposing team summary of 19 separate stats 





Disk - $34.95 
32K Required 

• Keeps track of all your rental properties 

• Provides instant screen or printer summary of all 
your properties 

• Maintains and prints a detailed, itemized listing of 
each of 28 expense categories 

• Gives you a schedule of the Accelerated Cost 
Recovery System depreciation allowed for each tax 
year for 3, 5, 10 and 15 year property 



SAtlfflCAF 

Graphics ftlitor 

• Graphics editor to create and modify your 
own pictures 

• Pictures can be usd as a title screen for 
a program 

• Create a series of pictures to make a 
slide show 

• Both Extended and non-Extended Basic 
versions on the same tape 

• High Resolution 

• Semigraphic modes 
8, 12, and 24 
(64 x 64, 64 x 96 
and 64 x 128) 

• 8 colors 

• Combine text 
with graphics 

• Auto-repeat and 
"magic" delete 

• Requires 16K 

$19.95 
$24.95 




Dealer and author inquiries are al- 
ways welcome. Canadian dealers 
should contact Kelly Software Dis- 
tributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 11932, 
Eomonton, Alberta T5J-3L1, (403) 
421-8003. 

Disk software compatible with Radio 
Shack DOS only. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

2153 Leah Lane 

Reynoldsburg, Ohio 43068 

(614)861-0565 

A complete catalog of other sweet 
Sugar Software products is available. 



Add $1.50 per tape for postage and 
handling. Ohioans add 5.5% sales tax. 
COD orders are welcome. CIS orders 
EMAIL to 70405, 1374. No refunds or 
exchanges. 



07B0 AA 


8D 01F5 


09290 0R2 


ORA 


RESB,PCR PUT SELECTED COLOR 


07B4 A7 


8D 01F1 


09300 


STA 


RESR.PCR 


07B8 64 


8D 01EE 


09310 


LSR 


BITAN.PCR ANALIZE NEXT TWO BITE 


07BC 64 


8D 01EA 


09320 


LSR 


BITAN , PCR 


07C0 26 


D4 


09330 


BNE 


ORl NOT FINISHED YET? 


07C2 32 


62 


09340 


LEAS 


2,S ADJOST STACK 


07C4 E6 


8D 01 El 


09350 


LDB 


RESB.PCR BYTE TO PUT IN SCREE! 


07C8 39 




09360 


RTS 








09370 * SHIFT 


. SUBROUTINE TO SHIFT A MATRIX AN SPECIFIED 






09380 * NUMBER OF BITS 






09390 * ON ENTRY: 








09400 * 


U* 


ADDRESS OF FIG. DE5C. TABLE 






09410 * 


A- 


0BITS TO SHIFT. 






09420 * 




IF A<0 SHIFT LEFT 






09430 * 




IF A>0 SHIFT RIGHT 






09440 * ON EXIT: THE SWAP AREA FOR FIGURE IS SHIFTED. 






09450 * 


EXCEPT FOR U, NO REGISTERS ARE PRESERVED 




07C9 


09460 SHIFT 


EQU 


* 






09470 *PUT tfBITS TO 


SHIFT IN X 


07C9 IF 


89 


09480 


TFR 


A,B 


07CD 4D 




09490 


TSTA 




07 CC 2A 


01 


09500 


BPL 


POSIT 


07CE 50 




09510 


NEGB 






07 CF 


09520 POSIT 


EQU 


* 


07CF 34 


02 


09530 


FSIIS 


A 


07D1 4F 




09540 


CLRA 




07D2 IF 


01 


09550 


TFR 


D,X PUT IN X 


07D4 17 


005A 


09560 


LBSR 


NORMY TO NORMALIZE Y 


07117 35 


02 


09570 


PULS 


A 


07D9 10AE 


C8 00 


09580 


LDY 


<ASW,U 


07DD 34 


30 


09590 


PSHS 


X,Y 


07DF E6 


C8 OF 


09600 SHO 


LDB 


<MAXBYT,U 


07E2 10AE 


62 


09610 


LDY 


2,S 


07E5 4D 




09620 SHOB 


TSTA 


SHIFT RIGHT? 


07E6 2B 


09 


09630 


BMI 


SH2A ' NO, LEFT 


07E8 1C 


FE 


09640 


ANDCC 


#$FE 


07EA 66 


AO 


09650 SHI 


ROR 


,Y+ 


07EC 5A 




09660 


DECB 




07ED 26 


FB 


09670 


BNE 


SHI 


07 EF 20 


09 


09680 


BRA 


NEXTST 


07F1 31 


A5 


09690 SH2A 


LEAY 


B,Y 


07F3 1C 


FE 


09700 


ANDCC 


#$FE 


07F5 69 


A2 


09710 SH2B 


ROL 


»-Y 


07F7 5A 




09720 


DECB 




07F8 26 


FB 


09730 


BNE 


SH2B 


07FA 30 


IF 


09740 NEXTST 


LEAX 


-1,X MORE BITS TO SHIFT? 


07FC 26 


El 


09750 


BNE 


SHO YES 


07FE 6A 


8D 01A9 


09760 


DEC 


ROWS, PCR MORE ROWS? 


0802 27 


OF 


09770 


BEQ 


ENS H IF NO 


0804 E6 


C8 OF 


09780 


LDB 


<MAXBYT,U ADJUST TO FIRST COL. 


0807 10AE 62 


09790 


LDY 


2,S 


080A 31 


A5 


09800 


LEAY 


B,Y 


080C 1 OAF 62 


09810 


STY 


2,S 


080F AE 


E4 


09820 


LDX 


,s 


0811 20 


D2 


09830 


BRA 


SHOB 






One-Liner Contest Winner . . 




_ _. J automatically 

puts it into BASIC DRTR statements. Just load the 
machine language code, RUN the program, set up a 
blank cassette to record and input the start and end 
addresses of the code. When you GL'pflD the resulting 
tape, your DATR lines are all complete. 

.: fhel 




iilBli^iilii^aiORDER. ON?": INPUT 

■,.TSfflRT»jBit 

-1 , "DATA" : Q*103 FORK^B TO E STEPS 

; ^»^MiilittSTR*-.CQ >.+■". DATA » ; FOR J 



«0TD7 : X**STR* ( PEEK < J+K > ) : : A*~A*+ 
R IGHT* < X* \ LEN (X* > ~ 1 ) + " , " : NEXT 3 : P 
RINT^ 

(For this Winning one-liner contest entry v the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book Of Advemures&ndfa companion Rainbow \ 



78 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



0813 


35 


BO 


09840 


ENSHIF POLS 


Y,X,PC 








09850 


* 


CALCULATES MAXIMUM NUMBER OF BYTES PER ROW 








09860 


* 


FOR A FIGURE 










09870 


A 


ON 


ENTRY; U= 


ADDRESS OF FIGURE DESCRIPTOR TABLE 








09880 


* 




B= 


WIDTH IN PIXELS 








09890 


* 


ON 


EXIT: MAXBYT WITH VALUE 








09900 


* 


U,X,Y ARE PRESERVED 






0815 


09910 


CMAXBY EQU 


* 


0815 


96 


B6 


09920 






LDA 


<$B6 GET PMODE 


0817 


81 


04 


09930 






CMPA 


#4 IS PMODE 4? 


0819 


27 


05 


09940 






BEQ 


CMAX1 YES 


081B 


84 


01 


09950 






ANDA 


#1 IF PMODE 1 OR 3 


081D 


26 


01 


09960 






BNE 


CMAX1 DO NOTHING 


081F 


54 




09970 






LSRB 


NO, DIVIDE BY 2 






0820 


09980 


CMAX1 EQU 


* 


0820 


IF 


98 


09990 






TFR 


B,A SAVE TO OBTAIN 


0822 


84 


07 


10000 






ANDA 


#$07 REMAINDER OF D/8 


0824 


54 




10010 






LSRB 


DIVIDE BY 8 


0825 


54 




10020 






LSRB 




0826 


54 




10030 






LSRB 




0827 


5C 




10040 






INCB 


ADD 1 TO THE RESULT 


0828 


81 


02 


10050 






CMPA 


#2 IF REMAINDERS 


082A 


2D 


01 


10060 






BLT 


CMAX2 GO OUT 


08 2C 


5C 




10070 






INCB 


IF NOT ADD 1 OF RESULT 


082D 


F.7 


C8 OF 


10080 


CMAX2 STB 


<MAXBYT,U 


0830 


39 




10090 






RTS 










10100 


* 


FIND REQUIRED NUMBER OF 








10110 


* 


BYTES FOR A GIVEN NUMBER 








10120 


* 


OF 


ROWS. 










10130 


* 


ON 


ENTRY: U- 


ADDR, OF FDT 








10140 


* 


ON 


EXIT: A AND ROWS WITH VALUE 








10150 


* 


EXCEPT FOR A ALL REGS. ARE PRESERVED 


0831 


A6 


C8 05 


10160 


NORMY LDA 


<HEIGHT,U GET ROWS 


0834 


A7 


8D 0173 


10170 






STA 


ROWS, PCR 


0838 


96 


B6 


10180 






LDA 


<$B6 GET PMODE 


083A 81 


01 


10190 






CMPA 


#1 NORMALIZE? 


083C 


22 


04 


10200 






BHI 


RETNY NO 


083E 


64 


8D 0169 


10210 






LSR 


ROWS, PCR YES, DIVIDE 


0842 


A6 


8D 0165 


10220 


RETNY LDA 


ROWS, PCR 


0846 


39 




10230 






RTS 










10240 


* 


GET ADDRESS OF FIGURE 








10250 


* 


DESCRIPTOR TABLE (FDT) 








10260 


* 


ON 


ENTRY: X= 


ADDR. OF PARMLIST 








10270 


A 


ON 


EXIT: U*ADDR. OF FDT 








10280 


* 


X AND Y ARE PRESERVED 






0847 


10290 


GETFDT EQU 


* 


0847 


86 


AA 


10300 






LDA 


#$AA SYSTEM INITIALIZED? 


0849 


Al 


8D 01DF 


10310 






CMPA 


2+FCTAB,PCR 


084D 


27 


05 


10320 






BEQ 


GE2 YES, OK 


084F 


C6 


07 


10330 






LDB 


#XNI ELSE ERROR 


0851 


16 


00D9 


10340 






LBRA 


ERROR 


0854 


33 


8D 01 D8 


10350 


GE2 


LEAU 


FFDT.PCR ADDR. OF FIRST FDT 


0858 


34 


40 


10360 






PSHS 


U 


085A A6 


01 


10370 






LDA 


1,X FIGURE NUMBER 


085C 


27 


06 


10380 






BEQ 


GE3 FIGURE CAN'T BE ZERO 


085E Al 


8D 01C8 


10390 






CMPA 


FCTAB,PCR EXCEEDS MAX. NBR. OF FIG 


0862 


23 


05 


10400 






BLS 


GE4 NO, OK 


0864 


C6 


02 


10410 


GE3 


LDB 


#XOF ELSE ERROR 


0866 


16 


00C4 


10420 






LBRA 


ERROR 


0869 


Al 


8D 01BE 


10430 


GE4 


CMPA 


1+FCTAB.PCR GREATER THAN CREATED FIGS 


086D 


23 


05 


10440 






BLS 


GE5 NO, OK 


086F 


C6 


06 


10450 






LDB 


#XNC ELSE ERROR 


0871 


16" 


00B9 


10460 






LBRA 


ERROR 


0874 


C6 


18 


10470 


GE5 


LDB 


#24 SIZE IN BYTES OF A FDT 


0876 


4A 




10480 






DECA 


TO OFFSET 


0877 


3D 




10490 






MUL 


DISPLACEMENT 


0878 


E3 


El 


10500 






ADDD 


,S++ REAL ADDRESS 


08 7 A 


IF 


03 


10510 






TFR 


D,U LEAVE IN U 


087C 


39 




10520 






RTS 










10530 


* 


RANDOM. FIND 


A RANDOM NUMBER 








10540 


A 


ON 


ENTRY: A= 


MAX. VALUE OF NUMBER TO GENERATE 








10550 


* 


ON 


EXIT: B-RANDOM NUMBER. ALL REGS. PRESERVED BUT B 






087D 


10360 


RANDOM EQU 


* 


087D 


34 


02 


1057U 






PSHS 


A SAVE MAX. VALUE OF RANDOM NUMBER 


087F 


6D 


SD 0134 


10580 






TST 


PERIOD, PCR SEQUENCE EXHAUSTED? 


0883 


26 


07 


10590 






BNE 


RA2 NO 


0885 


FC 


0112 


10600 






LDD 


$112 GET VALUE OF TIMER 


0888 


ED 


8D 0129 


10610 






STD 


SEED, PCR AND USE IT AS NEW SEED 






088C 


10620 


RA2 


EQU 


* 


088C 


EC 


8D 0125 


10630 






LDD 


SEED, PCR GET SEED NUMBER 


0890 


34 


06 


10640 






PSHS 


D 


0892 


86 


02, 


10650 






LDA 


#2 WILL MULTIPLY SEED BY 4 


0894 


68 


8D 011E 


10660 


RA3 


LSL 


1+SEED,PCR TWO TIMES 2 


0898 


69 


8D 0119 


10670 






ROL 


SEED, PCR 


089C 


4A 




10680 






DECA 




0890 


26 


F5 


10690 






BNE 


RA3 IF NOT DONE CONTINUE 


909F 


35 


06 


10700 






PULS 


D GET OLD SEED 


J8A1 


E3 


8D 0110 


10710 






ADDD 


SEED, PCR THUS: OLD SEED BY 5 


08A5 


C3 


0035 


10720 






ADDD 


#53 PLUS 53 


)8A8 


ED 


8D 0109 


10730 






STD 


SEED, PCR NEW SEED 


:8AC 


C6 


FF 


10740 






LDB 


#$FF MASK TO REDUCE RANDOM 


'J8AE 


E7 


8D 0102 


10750 






STB 


AUX2,PCR 


18 B2 


Al 


E4 


10760 


RMAX 


CMPA 


,S IS NUMBF.R LESS OR EQUAL THAN MAX? 


J8B4 


23 


OA 


10770 






BLS 


ENRA YES, GET OUT 


08B6 


64 


8D OOFA 


10780 






LSR 


AUX2,PCR GET RID OF LEFT BIT 


08BA A4 


8D 00F6 


10790 






ANDA 


AUX2,PCR 


08BE 


20 


F2 


10800 






BRA 


RMAX AND COMPARE AGAIN 






08C0 


10810 


ENRA 


EQU 


* NUMBER FOUND 


O8C0 


IF 


89 


10820 






TFR 


A,B LEAVE IN B 


08C2 


6C 


8D 00F1 


10830 






INC 


PERIOD, PCR PERIOD COUNTER 


08C6 


35 


82 


10840 






PULS 


A, PC ADJUST STACK AND RETURN 








10850 


* 


COPY ONE SWAP AREA INTO ANOTHER 








10060 


* 


ON 


entry: X a 


ADDR. OF FROM AREA 








10870 


* 




u- 


ADDR. OF TO AREA 








10880 


* 




Y=# OF BYTES TO COPY 








10890 


A 


ON 


EXIT: AREA COPIED. ONLY A IS PRESERVED 






08C8 


10900 


COPYSW EQU 


* 


08C8 


E6 


80 


10910 






LDB 


,X+ GET BYTE 


08CA 


E7 


CO 


10920 






STB 


,U+ STORE IN TO-AREA 


08CC 


31 


3F 


10930 






LEAY 


-1,Y DECREMENT COUNTER 


08CE 


26 


F8 


10940 






BNE 


COPYSW MORE TO COPY? 


08D0 


39 




10950 






RTS 










10360 


* 


VERIFY IF ACTION ON OUT 








10970 


* 


OF 


SCREEN IS 


REQUIRED 








10980 


* 


ON 


ENTRY: Y= 


ADDR. OF VALUE FOR X/Y 








10990 


* 




FLG WITH FOR X OR 64 FOR Y 







11000 


* ON EXIT: CACX/CACY WITH X/Y DESTINATIONS 


09B2 


00 12100 BKCOLO FCB 






11010 


* EXCEPT FOR D 


ALL RF^TSTERS ARE PRESERVED 


09B3 


00 12110 AUX2H FCB 




08D1 


11020 


ACTOSC 


EQU 


* 


09B4 


00 12120 AUX2 FCB 


08D1 6D 


8D 00D9 


11030 




TST 


1+FLG.PCR TESTING X-COORD? 


09B5 


0000 12130 SEED FDU SEED VALUE FOR RANDOM ROUTINE 


08D5 27 


05 


11040 




BEQ 


LO 


09B7 


00 12140 PERIOD FCB PERIOD COUNTER OF RANDOM SEQUENCE 


08D7 E6 


C8 05 


11050 




LDB 


<HEIGHT,U GET VERTICAL SIZE 


09B8 


0000 12150 STATUS FDB STATUS 


08DA 20 


03 


11060 




BRA 


LI 


09BA 


OD 12160 ERMASK FCB $0D SKIP LINE 


08DC E6 


C8 04 


11070 


LO 


LDB 


<WIDTH,U GET HORIZONTAL SIZE 


09BB 


58 12170 FCC /X## ERROR / 


08DF FJ 


8D OOD] 


11080 


T,l 


STB 


AUX 2 , PCR 


09C5 


4F 12180 FCC /ON FIGURE ### / 


08E3 EC 


A4 


11090 




LDD 


,Y GET X/Y VALUE 


09D3 


41 12190 FCC /ACTION #/ 


08ES 4D 




11100 




TSTA 


NEGATIVE? 


09DB 


OD 12200 FCB $0D SKIP LINE 


08E6 2D 


OF 


11110 




BLT 


LIB 


09DC 


4F 12210 ERMSGT FCC /OSOMOFIOEXEYNCNIIC/ 


08E8 E3 


8D 00C1 


11120 




ADDD 


FLG, PCR ADD IT WITH FLAG (64 IF Y) 


09EE 


0000 12220 SAVSTK FDB 


08EC E3 


8D 00C3 


11130 




ADDD 


AUX2H.PCR ADD TO SUBTOTAL 


09F0 


12230 STACK RMB $32 


08F0 4D 




11140 




TSTA 


GREATER THAN 255? 




0000 12240 XOS EQU OUT OF SCREEN 


08F1 27 


2F 


11150 




BEQ 


LXX ...NO GET-OUT 




0001 12250 XOM EQU 1 OUT OF MEMORY 


08F3 C6 


02 


11160 




LDB 


#2 




0002 12260 XOF EQU 2 INVALID FIG. NUMBER 


08F5 20 


02 


11170 




BRA 


L1A 




0003 12270 XIO EQU 3 INVALID OPTION 


08F7 C6 


01 


11180 


LIB 


LDB 


#1 




0004 12280 XEX EQU 4 EXCEEDS MAX. X PIXELS 


08F9 EA 


8D OOBC 


11190 


L1A 


ORB 


1+STATUS,PCR 




0005 12290 XEY EQU 5 EXCEEDS MAX. Y PIXELS 


08FD E7 


8D 00B8 


11200 




STB 


1+STATUS,PCR 




0006 12300 XNC EQU 6 FIG. NOT CREATED 


0901 E6 


C8 10 


11210 




LDB 


<OUTSCR,U WHAT TO DO? 




0007 12310 XNI EQU 7 ANIMATIC NOT INITIALIZED 


0904 27 


ID 


11220 




BEQ 


LERX MARK ERROR 




0008 12320 XIC EQU 8 CAN'T COPY FIGS. 


0906 CO 


02 


1 1 230 




SOBB 


n 




12330 * 


0908 27 


IE 


11240 




BEQ 


LREX REMOVE FIGURE 


0A22 


12340 PARMS RMB 8 


090A 4D 




11250 




TSTA 


OUT-OF-SCREEN LEFT OR UP? 




12350 * 


090B 2A 


01 


11260 




BPL 


L2 . . .NO 


0A2A 


0000 12360 FCTAB FDB F1GORES CONROL TABLE 


090D 53 




11270 




COMB 




0A2C 


0000 12370 FDB 


090E 5D 




11280 


L2 


TSTB 


WHAT TO DO? 


0A2E 


0000 12380 FDB 


090F 2C 


OD 


11290 




BGE 


L4 ADJUST TO ZERO 




0000 12390 NFIGS EQU 


0911 AF 




11300 




CLRA 


FREEZE IN BORDER 




0001 12400 ADFFDT EQU 1 


0912 C6 


FF 


11310 




LDB 


#255 




0003 12410 NEXTSW EQU 3 


0914 EO 


8D 0096 


11320 




SUBB 


1+FLG,PCR 191 IF Y 


0A30 


12420 FFDT RMB 1 DISPLACEMENT TO FIRST FDT 


0918 EO 


8D 0098 


11330 




SUBB 


AUX2.PCR 




0000 12430 ASW EQU ADDR. OF KEEP AREA 


091C 20 


02 


11340 




BRA 


LPX GET OUT 




0002 12440 ORFLAG EQU 2 MIX, FLAG/SWAP FOR MIX. FIGS 


091E 4F 




11350 


L4 


CLRA 


ADJUST TO ZERO 




0004 12450 WIDTH EQU 4 WIDTH IN PIXELS 


091F 5F 




11360 




CLRB 






0005 12460 HEIGHT EQU 5 HEIGHT IN PIXELS 


0920 ED 


A4 


11370 


LPX 


STD 


,Y STORE NEW DEST. COORD. 




0006 12470 FIGCAD EQU 6 ADDR. OF FIG. ON SCREEN 


0922 39 




11380 


LXX 


RTS 


END ROUTINE 




0008 12480 AUTOX EQU 8 COLUMN POSITION ON SCREEN (PIXELS) 


0923 C6 


00 


11390 


LERX 


LDB 


#XOS ERROR INDICATOR 




0009 12490 AUTOY EQU 9 ROW POSITION ON SCREEN (PIXELS) 


0925 16 


0005 


11400 




LBRA 


ERROR 




000A 12500 LMASK EQU 10 MASK WITH VALID BITS OF LEFTMOST BYTE 


0928 32 


62 


11410 LREX 


LEAS 


2,S ADJUST STACK 




OOOB 12510 RMASK EQU 11 MASK WITH VALID BITS OF RIGHTMOST BYTE 


092A 16 


FABE 


11420 




LBRA 


REMOV2 TO REMOVE FIGURE 




000C 12520 OLMASK EQU 12 ORIGINAL LMASK 






11430 


* ERROB 


. THIS 


ROUTINE WILL SIGNAL ERRORS AND EXIT 




000D 12530 ORMASK EQU 13 ORIGINAL RMASK 






11440 


* ON ENTRY: B- 


CODE OF ERROR TO BE ISSUED 




000E 12540 WIDBYT EQU 14 ACTUAL WIDUT IN BYTES-1 






11450 


* ON EXIT: ERROR MESSAGE PLUS PROGRAM TERMINATION 




000F 12550 MAXBYT EQU 15 MAXIMUM POSSIBLE WIDTH IN BYTES 




092D 


11460 


ERROR 


EQU 


* 




0010 12560 OUTSCR EQU 16 ACTION IF OUT OF SCREEN 


092D 31 


8D 0089 


11470 




LEAY 


ERMASK,PCR ADDR. OF PRINT MASK 




0011 12570 FLAGCR EQU 17 FLAG FOR NEWLY CREATED FIG. 


0931 30 


8D 00A7 


11480 




LEAX 


ERMSGT.FCR TABLE OF ERRORS 




0012 12580 F1GBYT EQU 18 MAX NUMBER OF BYTES FOR FIGURE 


0935 58 




11490 




ASLB 


MULTIPLY CODE BY 2 




0014 12590 OWID EQU 20 ORIG. WIDTH 


0936 3A 




11500 




ABX 


OFFSET 




12600 * BYTES 21-23 RESERVED FOR FUTURE * 


0937 A6 


80 


11510 




LDA 


,X+ GET FIRST CHAR OF ERROR TYPE 


0A31 


.00 12610 ENDGRA FCB 


0939 A7 


22 


11520 




STA 


2,Y ON MASK 




0000 12620 END 


093B A6 


84 


11530 




LDA 


,X SECOND CHAR 


00000 


TOTAL ERRORS _ 


093D A7 
093F A6 
0943 8A 


23 

8D 0065 

30 


11540 
11550 
11560 




STA 
LDA 
ORA 


3,Y 

ACTION, PCR ACTION 

#$30 TO ASCII FORMAT 












0945 A7 


A8 20 


11570 




STA 


32, Y PUT IN MASK 








0948 4F 




11580 




CLRA 








*********************** 


0949 E6 


8D 0OD6 


11590 




LDB 


1+PARMS,PCR FIGURE NUMBER 






* *^<£»K EXRAMDER3 * 


094D 31 
0950 CI 


A8 15 
64 


11600 
11610 


ERR01 


LEAY 
CMPB 


21 ,Y POINT TO MASK AREA FOR FIG. NUMBR. 
#100 HERE WE WILL CONVERT 




* Permanent Software in a ROM that allows * 


0952 2D 


05 


11620 




BLT 


ERR02 FIG. NMBR. TO ASCII 






* -full use o-f both 32K memory banks in 64K * 


0954 CO 
0956 4C 


64 


11630 
11640 




SUBB 
INCA 


#100 NUMBER OF HUNDREDS 






* or larger computers. 96KX-M module 459.95 * 


0957 20 


F7 


11650 




BRA 


ERWOl 






* Cartridge. *49.95 * 


0959 8A 


30 


11660 


ERR02 


ORA 


#$30 HUNDREDS IN ASCII 






* * 


095B A7 


AO 


11670 




STA 


,Y+ PUT IN PRINT MASK 






095D 4F 




11680 




CLRA 








* VIDEO REVERSERS * 


095E CI 
0960 2D 
0962 CO 


OA 
05 
OA 


11690 
11700 
11710 


ERR02B 


CMPB 

BLT 

SUBB 


#10 TENS 

ERR03 

#10 






* Provide <1> Reversed „ (2) Reversed all * 








* Capitals, & <3) Normal Display *24.95 * 


0964 4C 




11720 




INCA 








* (See December 1984 Rainbow Review) * 


0963 20 


F7 


11730 




BRA 


ERR02B 






* * 


0967 8A 


30 


11740 


ERR03 


ORA 


#$30 TO ASCII 






0969 A7 


AO 


11750 




STA 


,Y-f 






* X3QK MEMORIES * 


096B CA 
096D E7 


30 

A4 


11760 
11770 




ORB 

STB 


#$30 AND UNITS IN ASCII TOO 






* Solder less modular design upgrades all * 


096F C6 


21 


11780 




LDB 


#33 NUMBER OF CHARS IN MASK 






* 64K Color Computers to 12BK. *129 * 


0971 31 
0975 A6 


8D 0045 
AO 


11790 
11800 


ERRPRI 


LEAY 
LDA 


ERMASK.PCR TO BEGINING OF MASK 
,Y+ GET CHAR FROM BYTE 






* We also have 64K upgrades -for D,E & 285 * 


0977 AD 


9F A002 


11810 




JSR 


[$A002J WRITE CHAR ON SCREEN 






* * 


097« 5A 
097C 26 


F7 


11820 
11830 




DECB 
BNE 


DECREMENT COUNTER 
ERRPRI PRINT MORE CHARS 






* PROGRAM SAVER * 


097E 6C 


8D 0036 


11840 




INC 


STATUS, PCR FLAG STATUS WITH ERROR 






* Uninterrupted Power Source (UPS) provides * 


0982 6D 
0986 27 


8D 00A9 
08 


11850 

11860 




TST 
BEQ 


5+FCTAB,PCR IF CALLED FROM ASSEMBLER 
EXIT USE NORMAL EXIT 






* 5 volts to RAMS saving your programs when * 


0988 10EE 


8D 0061 


11870 




LDS 


SAVSTK.PCR RESTORE STACK POINTER 






* power fails. Mounts under keyboard. 459. 95 * 


098D 7E 


B44A 


11880 




JMP 


$B44A MAKE A FC ERROR 






* * 


0990 10E1 


8D 0059 


11890 
11900 


EXIT 


LDS 


SAVSTK,PCR RESTORE STACK ADDR. 






* DYNAMIC COLOR NEWS * 


0995 EC 


8D 001F 


11910 




LDD 


STATUS.PCR TO PRESENT STATUS 






* Educational material on Color Computers. 4c 


0999 6D 


8D 0092 


11920 




TST 


5+FCTAB.PCR IF CALLED FROM ASSEMBLER 








099D 27 


03 


11930 




BEQ 


EXITA GET-OUT 






* Recent editorials on writing programs * 


099F 7E 
09A2 39 


B4F4 


11940 
11950 
11960 




JMP 


$B4F4 OTHERWISE RETURN TO BASIC 






* especially for 64K and larger memories. * 




EX IT A w-xd 

*** DATA REFERENCES 






* Monthly Newsletter. *15/yr, Sample *1. * 


09A3 


00 


11970 


CACX 


FCB 









* * 


09A4 
09A5 


00 
00 


11980 
11990 


CADX 
CACY 


FCB 
FCB 


TOP-LEFT COLUMN DEST. CORNER 







* SOFTWARE * 


09A6 


00 


12000 


CADY 


FCB 


TOP-LEFT ROW DEST. CORNER 






* DISASM - Decimal 6809 Assembler. $19.95 « 


09A7 
09A8 


00 
00 


12010 
12020 


ACT 10 2 
ACTION 


FCB 
FCB 




CURRENT OPTION 






* MPM - Stack up to 5 programs. *14.95 * 


09A9 


00 


12030 


RE SB 


FCB 









* (See April 1985 Rainbow MPM review) * 


09AA 
09AB 


00 
00 


12040 
12050 


BITAN 
ROWS 


FCB 
FCB 











* DYTERM - Terminal Program. *14.95 * 


09AC 


00 


12060 


AUX 


FCB 









* Checks, Visa & MC Cards. Add *2 ship. * 


09AD 
09AF 


0000 
00 


12070 
12080 


FLG 
AUX 3 


FDB 
FCB 










* Free Catalog. 24 Hour phone. * 


O9B0 


-0000 


12090 


AUX4 


FDB 









* * 

* D YMAM I O ELECTRON I OS * 

* BOX 0<^<£» <205) 773-2758 * 

* HARTSEL-L-E , AL 35<£»^0 * 
*********************** 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 79 




16K 
ECB 



Send 

In The 
Clowns 



By Daryl Judd 



This simple program, called The Clown, represents 
an initial experiment with graphics by the 
author. His idea for The Clown was inspired 
on a cold day in an attempt to turn thoughts to fair 
weather. The program also plays a refrain from the 
well-known tune, "Send in the Clowns." It requires 
16K ECB and uses regular BASIC program commands. 



(Daryl Judd directs the news at KIVI-TV channel six in 
Nampa, Idaho. He works on his computer in his spare 
time.) 



v/ 

f * 240 ... 


....13 


510 ... 


...199 


690 . . . 


...695 


END .. 


...173 


I . 



The listing: CLOWN 

10 CLS:PCLEAR8 

20 A$="L4CL4DL4GL1GP2" :B$="L4AL4 

BL4GL4AL4BL4BL2BP4 " 

30 C$="L4B04L4D03L4DL1EP4":D$="L 

4EL4GL4CL1DP4" 

4/3 E$="L4EL4EL4GL4CL1D" : F$="P1L4 

DL4EL4GL4G-L1G" 

50 PRINT"the Clown" :PRINT@498, "B 

Y DARYL JUDD"; 



6/3 FORX=1TO500:NEXTX 

70 PMODE 3 , 1 : PCLS : COLOR 2,2 

80 REM*BALLOONS* 

9/3 CIRCLE (5ft, 5ft) ,20,2 

lftft PAINT (35, 53) ,2,2 

110 CIRCLE (50, 5ft) ,21, 3,1, 0, .27 

12/3 CIRCLE(70,70) ,20,3,1, .72, .49 

130 PAINT (7/3, 7/3) ,3,3 

14/3 LINE (48, 7)3) -(52 ,70) , PSET 

150 LINE(48,71)-(52,71) , PSET 

16/3 LINE(46,72)-(54,72) ,PSET 

170 COLOR 3,3 

180 LINE(50,70) -(50,180) , PSET 

190 LINE(69,90)-(71,90) ,PSET 

200 LINE(68,91)-(72,91) ,PSET 

210 LINE(66,92)-(74,92) ,PSET 



80 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



22)3 LINE (7)3, 9)3) -(7)3, 19)3) , PSET 


530 


PAINT | 


[97, 81), 2,2' 


23)3 CIRCLE (85, 3)3) ,2)3,4 


540 


LINE (99,70) -(99,80) , PSET 


24)3 PAINT (85,32) ,4,4 


550 


CIRCLE 


(96,80) ,16,3,1.2, .77, 


25)3 COLOR 4,4 


.1 






26)3 LINE(84,5)3)-(86, 5)3) , PSET 


560 


REM* DRAW RIGHT EYE* 


27)3 LINE(83,51)-(87,51) , PSET 


570 


CIRCLE 


(150,80), 15, 2, 2, ,42,. 


28)3 LINE(81,52)-(89,52) , PSET 


1 






29)3 COLOR 3,3 


580 


CIRCLE 


(150, 70), 25, 2,1, .71,. 


3)3)3 LINE(85, 50)-(85, 184) , PSET 


9 






31)3 SCREEN 1,)3 


590 


CIRCLE 


(150, 93), 10, 2, .5, .6,. 


32)3 PMODE 3,5 


93 






33)3 PCLS(2) 


600 


CIRCLE 


(140,80) ,15,2,1.2, ,75 


34)3 REM*DRAW HEAD* 


,.14 




35)3 CIRCLE (127, 8)3), 6)3, 3,1,. 5, 


610 


PAINT I 


;i41,81),2,2 


3 6)3 COLOR 3,1 


620 


LINE (143,70)-(143,80) ,PSET 




630 

,.1 
640 


CIRCLE 


(140,80) ,16,3,1.2, .77 








REM*DRAW MOUTH* 








650 
37 
660 
37 


CIRCLE 


(126, 77), 74, 2,1, .13,. 




^^^^LJ^^^^H 




CIRCLE 


(129,65) ,74,3,1, .13, . 




lo^^-^m W\^d 




67j3 

4 


CIRCLE 


(129, 95), 74, 3,. 9, .1,. 








680 


CIRCLE 


(77,128) ,10,3,1, .4, .8 




^^^s^^^ii 




3 








LMm;$mM 




690 
. 2 


CIRCLE 


(183,126) ,10,3,1, .72, 




I^^HKr^r^l 




700 


REM*DRAW HAIR* 








710 


CIRCLE 


(50, 90), 15, 4 








720 


CIRCLE 


(199, 90), 15, 4 


m AUH S 


730 


CIRCLE 


(30, 90), 20, 4 


* BBifl r 


740 


CIRCLE 


(218, 90), 20, 4 


37)3 LINE (68, 8)3) -(68, 1)30) , PSET 

38)3 LINE (185,8)3) -(185, 1)3)3) , PSET 

39)3 CIRCLE (68 , 133) , 65, 3 , . 5 , . 2 , . 

75 

400 CIRCLE (185,133) ,65,3, .5, .75 

,.3 

410 CIRCLE (129,100) ,74,3,1, .16, 

,355 

420 PAINT (127,21) ,1,3 

430 REM* DRAW 'NOSE* 

440 CIRCLE (130,110) ,15,2 

450 PAINT (130, 103), 3, 2 

4 60 COLOR 1,1 

470 CIRCLE (130, 110) , 7 , 1 , 1, . 45 , . 7 

9 

480 REM*DRAW LEFT EYE* 

490 CIRCLE (106,80) ,15,2,2, .42, . 

1 

500 CIRCLE (106,70) ,25, 2,1,. 6,. 7 


750 
760 
770 
780 


CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 


(18, 100), 10, 4 
(232, 100), 10, 4 
(30,75) ,12,4,1.8 
(220,75) ,12,4,1.8 


790 
800 


CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 


(50, 69), 18, 4 
(201, 69), 18, 4 


810 
820 


CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 


(34,63) ,22,4 
(213,63) ,22,4 


830 
840 
850 
860 
870 
880 
890 


CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 


(52,48) ,20,4, .6 
(198,48) ,20,4, .6 
(54,46) ,16,4 
(195,46) ,16,4 
(69, 40), 10, 4 
(180,40), 10, 4 
(79, 35), 8, 4 


900 
910 
920 


CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 
CIRCLE 


(174,35) ,8,4 
(88,28) ,4,4 
(162,29) ,4,4 


930 
it 


X$="XA< 


5 ; XA$ ; XB$ ; XC$ ; XD$ ; XE$ ; 


9 


940 


PLAY X$ 


i 


510 CIRCLE (106, 93), 10, 2,. 5,. 6,. 

93 

520 CIRCLE (96, 80), 15,2, 1.2, .75, 


950 


SCREEN 


1,1: PLAY F$ 


9 60 


GOTO 960 


.14 






(SR*\ 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 81 



DISK 



H^fl 



**ty 



Introducing The "Super Smart" 

DATA PACK II 
$ 44.95 TERMINAL COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE 

Also Supports The PBJ 80 Column "Word Pak", Deluxe RS-232 Pak, 
Parallel Printer Card and PBJ 2SP Pak 



TAPE 
$ 34.95 










"FEATURES" 



No Lost Information When Using Hi-Resolutiun Display On Line 

ASCII Compatible File Format 

Full Text Buffering 

Terminal Baud Rates 300 to 9600 

Automatic Word Wrap Eliminates Split Words 

Full/Half Duplex 

Automatic File Capture 

Programmable Word Length, Parity and Stop Bits 

Save and Load Text Buffer and Program Key Buffers to Tape 

or Disk 

9 I li-Resolution Display Formats, 28 to 255 x 24 

True Upper/lower Case Display 

Kill Graphics Option fur an Extra 6K 

Supports Line Break 



Freeze Display and Review Information On Line 

Send Files Directly from Buffer or Disk 

Full Disk Support for Disk Version 

Send Control Codes from Keyboard 

Separate Printer Baud Rates 1 10-9600 

Display on Screen or Output Contents of Buffer to Printer 

Automatir Mpmnry SpUsp 16-64K 

9 Programmable Function Key Variable Length Macro Buffer 

Programmable Prompt Character or Delay to Send Next Line 

Programmable Control Character Trapping 

Programmable Open/Close Buffer Characters 

Automatic Key Repeat For Editing 

Program and Memory Status Displays 









"The Wait is Finally Ovei" 

ANNOUNCING 
The CBASIC COMPILER 

Now anyone can create fast efficient Machine Language Programs 
ithout the Drudgery of using an Assembler. 



CBASIC is a fast Machine Language integer Basic Complier that can convert Color Basic programs into fast machine language programs. CBASIC features over 
100 Basic Commands and functions that fully support Disk, Tape, Screen and Printer I/O, Hi & Low Resolution Graphics, Sound, Play and String Operations just like 
Color Basic. CBASIC also includes a powerful full featured Basic program Editor using a 51,64 or 85 by 24 line display. The Hi-Resolution display can be automati- 
cally included in your compiled program for enhanced display capability and allow mixed text and graphic displays. 



Graphics Commands: 

Sound Commands: 
String Functions: 

Numeric Functions: 
I/O Commands: 



CIRCLE, COLOR, CLS, DRAW, GET. LINE, PAINT, 
PCLS. PCOPY, PMODE, PRESET, PSET, PUT, 
RESET, SCREEN, SET, POINT, PPOINT 

PLAY, SOUND 

CHR$, LEFTS, MID$, RIGHTS, LEN, INSTR, LSET, 
RSET, TRM$, STR$, StRING$, INKFY$, MKN$ 

ABS, POS, TIMER, RND, ASC, TAB, CAL, JOYSTK, 
PEEK, POKE, LOC, LOF, EOF, FREE, CVN, ERR, 
VARPTR, SWAP 

OPEN, CLOSE, INPUT LINEINPUT, PRINT WRITE, 
PRINT @, GET, PUT, KILL, CHAINM, FIELD, DATA, 
READ. RESTORE 



Program Control 



Editor Commands: 



FOR/ NEXT/STEP, GOTO/GOSUB. IF/THEN/ 
ELSE, RETURN, STOP. RETI, ON n GOTO/GOSUB, 
ON ERROR. ON RESET ON IRQ/FIRQ/NMI, ON 
OVR/NOVR, EXEC, LET 

ORG, REM OR \ END, DIM, END, BASE, RAM, ON/ 
OFF, RAM64K, HIRES, GENERATE, DPSET, STACK 

LINE EDIT, AUTO EDIT, COPY, MOVE, RENUM- 
BER, AUTO LINE*, PRINTER, LIST DELETE, 
SEARCH, REPLACE, BAUD RATE, PRINTER, 
CBASIC, TAPPEND, SKIP. SIZE. LOAD. SAVE. 
APPEND, KILL DIR. and much, much more. 



REQUIRES 32K and Disk, 64K recommended 



Introductory Price $119.00 

Regularly $149.00 



EB0 DC 




Screen Enhancement Program Comparison Chart 
PROGRAM FEATURES HI-RES II HI-RES I BRAND X 

NEW OLD 



NEW IMPROVED VERSION 

- UP TO 85 CHARACTERS PER LINE 
READABILITY 

ADJUSTABLE AUTOMATIC KEY REPEAT 

- PROPTECT 1-23 SCREEN LINES 

- CONTROL CODE KEYBOARD 

■ FULLY BASIC COMPATIBLE 

• DISPLAY FORMATS OF 28 to 255 CHARACTERS PER LINE 

■ FULL 96 UPPHK/LOWEH CASE CHARACTERS 

• MIXED GRAPHICS & TEXT OR SEPARATE 
GRAPHIC & TEXT SCREENS 

• INDIVIDUAL CHARACTER HIGHLIGHTING 

■ REVERSE CHARACTER HIGHLIGHT MODE 

• WRITTEN IN FAST MACHINE LANGUAGE 

• AUTOMATIC RELOCATES TO TOP OF 10/32K 

- AUTOMATICALLY SUPPORTS 64K of RAM WITH RESET CONTROL 

• REVERSE SCREEN 

■ ON SCREEN UNDERLINE 

• DOUBLE SIZE CHARACTERS 

■ ERASE TO END OF LINE 

• ERASE TO END OF SCREEN 

■ HOME CURSOR 

• BELL TONE CHARACTER 

• HOME CURSOR & CLEAR SCREEN 

• REQUIRES ONLY 2K OF RAM 

• COMPATIBLE WITH ALL TAPE & DISK SYSTEMS 



H±JXL,II SCREEN UIILIIV. 

fMtunn*'. J rj || [) | p . H f- j <1 h t ttia c a rter -s. 

Dn Screen UMPFgL IM I-Mfi 
Protect froM 1 to 23' Screen I tnes 
Full ?et of Cursor Control Functio 

table line lengths Frbn 28 to 255 characters 

28 Characters per li 

'■} 2 Characters per I i n 

3f> Characters per line 

^ Characters rer line 

51 Characters per line 

61 thar-Kters rer I in* 

8f (Witters rtr line 



Yes 
Yes 



$OJ.95 $OQ95 

mm^m tape mm J DISK 

ALL ORDERS SHIPPED FROM STOCK 
ADD $2.50 POSTAGE 

CD DIP 

5566 Ricochet Avenue Las Vegas, Nevada 89110 

(702) 152-0632 



Upper/Lower case characters Yes 
Mixed Text and Graphics Yes 
Separate Text & Graphics 
Print @ fully implemented 
Print @ on all line lengths 
Different line lengths 
Automatic Key Repeat 
Adjustable Key Repeat 
Auto Repeat Disable 
Erase to end of line/screen 
Home Cursor 
Solid or Blinking Cursor 
CLS command supported 
X,Y Coordinate Cursor 

Positioning 
Double Size Characters 
Individual/Continuous 

Highlighting 
On Screen Underlining 
Clear Key functional 
16.32 & 64K Supported 
Green or Black Background 

Color 
Dual Character sets for 

Enhanced 64 and 85 

Characters per line display Yes 
Protected Screen Lines 

(programmable) . 1 tn 2'A 

Full Control Code Keyboard 

for Screen control directly 

from the keyboard Yes 

Programmable Tab Character 

Spacing Yes 

Full Screen Reverse Function Yes 
Switch to & from the Standard 

1.6 by 32 Srreen for full 

compatability Yes 

On Error Goto Function No 

Extended Basic Required No 
All Machine Language ProgramYes 
RAM Required in addition tn 

Screen RAM 2K 

Program Price (Tape) $24.95 



Yes 

Yes 
Yes Yes 

Yes Yes 

Yes Yes 

28 to 255 (9)28 to 255 (9) 
Yes Yes 

Yes No 

Yes No 

Yes Yes 

Yes Yes 

Yes No 

Buff/Biack Buff/Black 



Yes 
Yes 



Yes Yes 

Yes Yes 

Clear/LkeysClear kev 
Yes Yes 

Yes No 



No 
Yes 



No 
No 
Yes 
Yes 

2K 
$19.95 



Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

51 only 

51 only(l) 

Yes 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Buff/Black 

No 
No 

No 
No 
No 
Yes 



No 

No 



No 
No 



No 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

2K 
$29.95 



VISA 

VISA, MASTERCARD AND COD. ACCEPTED 



Make your computer a 
piece of precision 
machinery with these 
blueprints for adding a 
real-time clock 




CoCo 

Chronograph 



By Colin J. Stearman 



1: 



lime is money" so they say, 
and going by the cost of the 
commercial real-time clocks 
available for the CoCo, they must be 
right 1 A real-time clock is simply a clock 
chip similar to one in a digital watch 
which can be read by the computer to 
find out the "rear 1 time, date and day 
of the week. The clock should run 



(Colin J. Stearman is an electronics 
engineer educated in the U.K. He has 
worked with all kinds of computers and 
has been a Co Co enthusiast for over 
three years.) 



independently of the computer and 
continue to keep time when the com- 
puter is off. With this in mind, let's 
design and build a real-time clock for 
CoCo. 

Design Goals 

The clock should be out of sight 
inside CoCo so it does not use up a 
valuable cartridge slot. CoCo should 
charge the clock batteries while youVc 
computing. Also, the clock chip should 
be inexpensive and accurate. 

To meet these goals, the CoCo 
Chronograph will be installed inside 
CoCo and use the OKI MSM5832 
clock/ calendar chip. It meets all the 
requirements and I have seen it adver- 
tised for as little as $3.95! It is also very 



simple to interface as the schematic in 
Figure 1 shows. The block diagram for 
this chip is shown in Figure 2. 

Construction 

The object of the construction is to 
mount a new 6821 PI A (Peripheral 
Interface Adapter) inside the computer 
without making irreversible modifica- 
tions to the circuit board. 1 did this by 
"piggybacking" the new PIA onto U4 
in the gray CoCo (U7 in the CoCo 2). 
U4 (U7) is an existing PIA used to drive 
the D/ A converter and control the 
VDG chip. 

To construct the unit, first gather the 
components listed in Figure I. JDR 
Microdevices (800-538-5000 or 800- 
995-5430 in California) is a good source 
for all the chips and transistors, Parts 
should run in the price range of $12- 
$15. By the time you add the board 
(Radio Shack #276-158 or similar) and 
the other miscellaneous resistors, 
capacitors and wire, the total cost 
should be under $25. (That satisfies goal 
#3 J) 

To assemble the parts, first remove 
the cover from CoCo and also the RF 
shield lid inside if yours has one. Locate 
U4 {U7 in CoCo 2) and the 6821 (6822 
in CoCo 2). Gently pry the IC out of 
its socket using a small screwdriver or 
IC puller. Be careful not to damage the 
pins. Put CoCo to one side as we will 
now construct the piggyback board 
assembly. 

Mount the 40-pin socket to the 
printed circuit board anywhere conven- 
ient, but remember it will be positioned 
directly over the PIA we just removed 
from CoCo and must not interfere with 
any nearby components. Also mount 
the socket toward the edge of the board 
to leave room for the other chips and 
components. Solder all pins on the 
socket to the PCB, but do not cut off 
the excess. 

Take the new 6821 and gently bend 
pin 24 outward a little so when the IC 
is put into the socket, this pin will not 
enter it. Put the IC in the socket and 
press it home- 
Mount the CD401I along side the 
6821 near pin 24. Solder all pins to the 
board. Using the hook-up wire, connect 
pins 7, 8, 9, 12 and 13 together, and 
also to pin 1 of the 40-pin socket. 
Connect pin 14 of the CD401 1 to pin 
20 on the 40-pin socket, Connect pins 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 83 



1 and 2 to pin 24 of the 6821, This is 
the bent pin not inserted into the socket 
Also connect this pin to a length of wire 
about nine inches long; the other end 
will be connected later. Connect pin 3 
of the CD401 1 to pin 24 of the 40-pin 
socket. 

Now mount the remainder of the 
components. The layout is not critical, 
but try to keep the crystal XT and the 
capacitors CI and C2 close to pins 16 
and 17 of the MSM5832. The batteries 
should not be mounled on the board, 
Use two A A size NiCads (Radio Shack 
#23-. 1 25) in a holder ( Rad io S hack #270- 
382). Connect to the holder with a 
battery snap (Radio Shack #270-325). 



The entire battery assembly can be 
mounted anywhere convenient in the 
case. (1 put mine under the keyboard.) 

Wire up the components as shown 
in Figure L All connections between 
the new PI A and the existing PI A are 
achieved later by the piggyback tech- 
nique. Letters *A' through 'H' show the 
connections between the clock circuit 
and the new PI A- Don't forget that 
connection between pin 3 and 40 on 
U5! All references to +5V can be picked 
up from pin 20 of U5. Similarly the 
0V connections can be connected to pin 
I of US, 

When all wiring is complete, turn the 
PCB upside down and cut off the wire- 



wrap pins from pins 2 through 19, and 
pins 39 and 40 only. Cut them as close 
as possible to the board. The next task 
is to mount the assembly on top of the 
6821 (6822) removed previously from 
CoCo. 

Locate this PI A and carefully bend 
pin 24 so it points vertically upward. 
Position the circuit assembly on top of 
this IC to test for fit. It may be necessary 
to splay the wire- wrap pins out a little, 
In order for the Finished assembly to 
fit under the RF shield lid if you have 
one, the remaining wire-wrap pins must 
be trimmed as short as possible. Gauge 
how much you can cut from each pin 
and then trim all to this height, 




ALL RESISTORS 25W 



Ul - 
U2 - 
U3 - 
U4 — 

U5 — 



SN7475 QUAD D FLIPFLOP 

MSM5832 OKI CLOCK CALENDAR 

CD401 1 CMOS QUAD NAMO GATE 

EXISTING KEYBOARD PIA 6821 

(6822 ON COCO 2) 

6821 PERIPHERAL INTERFACE 

ADAPTER 

Figure 1: 



PARTS LIST 

R -4x47KOHMS 

XT — 32768 CRYSTAL (STATEK CX-1V -32768) 

CI — 30 pF 

C2 —5— 30 pF ADJUSTABLE 

BT — 2 x 1.25v MiCd BATTERIES 

Ql — 2N3638 Vce (sat)=0. 1 V 

Q2 - 2N2222 

PARALLEL PORT AND REAL-TIME CLOCK 



84 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



TE5TO 



HOLDO 





A" to A 1 ; Address Input* 
WRITE: Write Enable 
READ: Read Friable 
HOLD: Count Hold 

Fnaftie 
CS: Chip Select 
D° lo D J : Data Input/ 

Output 
TEST; Test Input 
+30 AOJ: +30 Second 

Correction Input 
XT & XT: xtal o&cillaUir 

connections 
Vrw:+5VSu Ay 
CND: GrouT 



Figure 2 



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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 



85 



Now solder the wire-wrap pins to the 
original PIA, soldering each pin to its 
respective pin on the PIA. You should 
be connecting to pins J, 20 and 2 J 
through 3&. The wire-wrap pin 24 will 
connect to the up-turned pin 24 on the 
PIA. This pin will not connect to the 
CoCo socket when the PIA is returned 
to the CoCo motherboard. When 
soldering the assembly to the back of 
the PIA, minimize the amount of solder 
used so the IC will still fit into its socket. 
Also position the solder joint high on 
the pins so the lower part will still fit 
the socket. 

Now mount the finished assembly 
into CoCo. Press the lower PIA gently 
but firmly into the CoCo socket. All 
pins of the lower PIA must enter the 
socket, except for pin 24 which was bent 
upwards. Make sure pin 1 is returning 
to the same place it came from. If you 
can't remember, all chips are oriented 
the same way in both style CoCos. It's 
not easy to see that all pins enter the 
socket, so inspect the results carefully. 
The assembly should be firm and quite 
rigid when installed. 

The wire still left unattached must 
be soldered to pin 10 of the 6809 CPU. 
Cut this wire to a suitable length and 
attach it either directly to pin 10 of the 
6809 or to a convenient solder point 
connected to this pin. You'll have to 
trace one out, Probably soldering 
lightly to the chip is best as the CPU 
can more easily be replaced than the 
board if things go wrong! This wire 
picks up address line 2 to allow the 
software to distinguish between the two 
PIAs. 

If you followed my recent series^ 
"Cooking with CoCo," you may notice 
something familiar about the circuit in 
Figure L In Part six of that series 
(December 19&4 RAINBOW, Page 154), 
we constructed a parallel port by adding 
a new 6821 PIA chip. This had some 
unused ports and it is these which are 
used to access the real-time clock. 

If you do not want the parallel port* 
simply make no connections to pins 9 
through 19 of the \J5 chip. If you do, 
then check the "Cooking with CoCo" 
article previously mentioned on how to 
drive the port. If you built the port then, 
you'll have to modify it to accommodate 
the real-time clock, (The SN7404 used 
in fct Cooking with CoCo" must be 
replaced with a CD401 1 and this does 
not have the same pinout. If you don't 
change it, the clock will not work! Also^ 
you may need a larger board on which 
to mount the additional components.) 



Listing 1: RERLTIME 



7E00 
7E00 8D47 



no ui 
0002 
0003 
0004 
0005 
0006 
0007 
0008 
0009 
0010 
0011 
0012 
0013 
0014 
0015 
0016 
0017 
0018 
0019 
0020 
0021 
0022 
0023 
0024 
0025 
0026 
0027 
0028 
0029 
0030 
0031 
0032 
0033 
0034 
0035 
0036 
0037 
0038 
0039 
8040 
0041 
0042 
0043 
0044 
0045 
0046 
0047 
0048 
0049 
0050 
0051 
0052 
0053 
0054 
0055 
0056 
0057 
0058 
0059 
0060 
0061 
OOfiZ 
0063 
0064 
0065 
0066 
0067 
0068 
0069 
0070 
0071 
0072 
0073 
0074 
O075 
0076 
0077 
007S 



TTL CoCo Chronograph 

****** a************** ************ ************* 

* REAL TIME CLOCK PROGRAM * 

* C.J. STEARHAN (O 1985 * 

**** ft****** ************ * ** *** * **** ftft ********** 



* THIS ROUTINE IS CALLED FROM BASIC TO 

* SET OR READ THE MSM5832 CLOCK, THE 

* CALL IS: 

* 

* A=USR(VMPTR(A$)} 

* If A 15 ZERO CALL WAS OK. NOT ZERO PROBABLY 

* WEANS A$ NOT AT LEAST 14 CHARACTERS LONG 



WHERE A$ IS A H CHARACTER STRING AS FOLLOWS! 
i 



BYTE 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

n 

12 
13 
14 



MEANING 
YEARS TENS 
YEARS UNITS 
MONTH TENS 
MONTH UNITS 
DAY TENS 
DAYS UNITS 
DAY OF THE WEEK 
HOURS TENS 
HOURS UNITS 
MINS TENS 
MINS UNITS 
SECONDS TENS 
SECONDS UNITS 
READ/WRITE FLAG 



ALL VALUES ARE GIVEN AND RETURNED AS ASCII 
CHARACTERS, THE CLOCK IS IN 24 HOUR FORMAT. 
TJIE READ /WRITE FLAG L5 "0" TO READ THE CLOCK 
AND SET TO "1" TO WRITE THE CLOCK. 

THE LEAP YEAR FLAG IS SET TO CAUSE FEBRUARY 
TO HAVE 29 DAYS IN A LEAF YEAR, THIS CCC0R5 
WHENEVER THE THE CLOCK IS READ IN JANUARY 
OR FEBRUARY OF THE LEAP YEAR. THIS MAKES THE 
LEAF YEAR CORRECTION AUTOMATIC AND TRANSPARENT 
TO THE USER, ASSUMING THE CLOCK IS READ AT 
LEAST ONCE DURING JANUARY/ FEBRUARY OF THE 
LEAF YEAR 

A TYPICAL WRITE CALL TO SET THE DATE TO 
SEPTEMBER 19 1984 WEDNESDAY 
14:52 (SECONDS ARE NOT WRITTEN); 

A$-"8409 1941452001* 

WHEN CALL IS HADE DATA IS WRITTEN AND SECONDS 
SET TO ZERO 

TO READ THE CLOCK CALL WITH J 



* A$-STRING$(14."0 rt ) 



THE DATA IS RETURNED IN THE STRING IN THE 
SAME FORMAT AS ABOVE, INCLUDING SECONDS 

EACH CALL LEAVES THE CLOCK SET UP WITH 
A0-A3 HIGH, READ HIGH, WRITE AND HOLD LOW, AND 
CS HICH TO ENAHLE THE 1 SECOND INTERRUPT 
THIS INTERRUPT CQWKS IN ON CA1 AT $FF25 



*********************************************** 

ORG $7E0Q 
PWRCLK BSR TEST VERIFY CALL 
********** 

*TUIS ROUTINE READ/WRITES A BLOCK OF 13 BYTES 
*T0 TjHS CLOCK. life 14TH BYTE IS TO READ 
*DATA AND 1 TO WRITE DATA. ALL VALUES ARE ASCII 
*REG X POINTS TO THE FIRST BYTE TO GO AT CLOCK 



06 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Double-Check 

When all wiring and construction has 
been checked and double-checked, the 
assembly must be given the "smoke 
test." You may not be aware that all 
electronic components work by using 
smoke, but once the smoke gets out, 
they no longer work. How many chips 
have you had smoke come out of and 
they still work afterwards? 

Turn CoCo on and watch for any 
smoke leaks! If the normal banner 
comes up and all the smoke stays in 
the chips, things are looking good. Use 
your meter to measure the voltage 
between an OV point and pin I of the 
MSM5832. It should be around 4.8 
volts. 

Also measure across the emitter and 
collector of TR1: this is the same as 
measuring between pin I of the 
MSM5832 and pin 20 of the new PI A. 
This voltage should be about 0,1V and 
not more than 0.2V, This is the VCE(sat) 
of TR1, or the voltage from collector 
to emitter when the transistor is 
saturated. If it's too high, the MS M5832 
will have insufficient drive voltage, Try 
another 2N3638 if it is too high. Turn 
CoCo off and measure pin 1 of the 
MSM5832 against an OV point again. 
It should be around 2.5V if your 
batteries are charged. 



Calibration 

The crystal oscillator for the clock 
runs at 32.768kHz and is trimmed with 
C2. However, you cannot measure this 
frequency directly with either an 
oscilloscope or frequency meter because 
either one will load the oscillator and 
change the very thing you Ye trying to 
measure. If you do have access to either 
of these test instruments, you can 
measure the square wave on pin 9 of 
the MSM5832. It should have a period 
of 976.5625uS (micro-seconds) plus or 
minus 0,0Gl5uS. Use C2 to set it 
exactly. 

If you do not have such equipment, 
the only alternative method is to 
compare your CoCo Chronograph time 
with a quartz, watch or other accurate 
clock and adjust over several days. The 
adjustment of C2 is not very sensitive, 
so make reasonable size adjustments 
each time. Remember that C2 is a 
capacitor without stops and the adjust- 
ing screw will revolve a full 360 degrees, 
so at one point the capacitance change 
will reverse direction for the same 
direction turn of the screw adjustment. 



7E02 
7E04 
7E06 
7E08 
7E0A 
7E0C 
7E0E 
7E10 



C60G 
A60D 
6030 
3402 
6DE4 
270C 
A680 
8030 



7E12 8*80 
7E14 G105 
7E16 2602 
7E18 BAO0 
7iUA BD6D 
7&1C 6t>B4 
7E1E 2616 



7E20 
7E22 
7E24 
7E26 
7E28 
7E2A 
7E2C 
7E2E 
IE JO 
7E32 
7E34 
7E36 
7E37 
7E39 



C109 

2502 

8D3B 

C1D5 

26154 

8403 

2004 

CI 08 

27Ffl 

8A30 

A7&0 

3A 

2ADI 

3261 



7E3B CG0P 
7E3D 80511 
7E3F CG20 
7E41 F7FF24 
7E44 4F 
7E45 5F 
7E46 7EB4F4 



7E4 9 
7E4C 
7E4E 
7E50 
7E32 
7E54 
7E5G 
7T.57 
7E59 
7E5C 
7E5K 
7E60 



PDIJ3ED 

1F01 

AG 84 

tflOE 

2408 

3262 

4F 

C6FF 

7Bn4F4 

ECO 2 

1F01 

39 



7EG1 
7E63 
7E65 
7EG7 
7K69 
7E6B 
7E6D 
7E6F 
7671 
7E73 
7E74 



340G 

Efi 1 F 

CI 30 

261E 

8102 

221A 

A6LD 

0030 

CfiOA 

3D 

EIUE 



0079 * ADDRESS 0. 


SEE ABOVE FOR FORMAT 


0080 * 








ooai 


LDB 


in 


BYTE COUNTER 


0082 


LDA 


13, X 


CKT READ/WRITE FUG 


OQ83 


SUBA 


ro 


ZERO IF READ/MOT IF WRITE 


0084 


PSNS 


A 


SAVE FLAG 


0085 NXTVAL 1ST 


>s 


CHECK READ /WRITE FLAG 


0086 


BtiQ 


CLK 


BRANCH IP READING 


0087 


LDA 


■ *+ 


GET VALUE, WE'RE WRITING 


0088 


SUBA 


ro 


MAKE INTO A BINARY VALUE 


0089 * 








0090 * GET 


DATA . 


LN "A % ADDRESS IS TN "B" 


0091 * MSB 


OF "A' 


' SET FOR 


WRITE, MSB OF PI A IS 


0092 * AN INPUT 1 


[PRINTER BUSY) 


0093 * 








0094 


GRA 


tf$8G 


SET HIGH BIT FOR WRITE 


0095 


Q1PQ 


05 


WRITLNG H10? 


009fi 


BNJi 


CLK 


NO 


0097 


0RA 


#8 


SET 24 HOURS CLOCK FLAG 


0098 CLK 


ssa 


CLOCK 




0099 


TBT 


.3 


CHECK READ/WRITE FLAG 


0100 


BNE 


NOTRD 


NOT READING 


0101 * EGG 


if we 


Just read 


month. If It Is 1 or 2 


0102 * go to leapyear flag 


set routine 


0103 


CNPB 


#9 


JUST READ Ml? 


0104 


BNE 


NTHNTH 


MOT REAIUNG MONTHS 


0105 


BSR 


LEAP 


CHECK FOR LEAF YEAR 


0106 Hxmxi 


CMPB 


05 


READING III 07 


0107 


BNE 


NOTH10 


NO 


0108 BTHBI'I 


ANDA 


#3 


KEflP ONLY LOW 2 BITS 


0109 


UKA 


SAVEIT 




OHO worn in 


criPB 


#s 


READING D10? 


0111 


BEQ 


BTMflIT 




0112 SAVE11 


ORA 


H 


MAKE INTO ASCII 4 


0113 


STA 


,x+ 


PUT READ VALUE IN ARRAY 


0114 NOTfcD 


DECB 




NEXT ADDRESS 


0115 


R PL 


NXTVAL 


DO NEXT ADDRESS 


0116 


LEAS 


t,s 


RESTORE FLAG 


0117 * 








ona * SE1 


UP CLOCK TO ENABLE INTERRUPT 


0119 


LDB 


m 


A0-A3 HIGH 


0120 


BSR 


WRTADD 




0121 


LDB 


#$20 


READ HI, WRITE/HOLD LOW 


0122 


STB 


DR 




0123 


CLRA 




RETURN ZERO ERROR 


0124 


CLRB 






0125 


JI1P 


$B4F4 


EXIT 


0126 ***** 








0127 * THIS 


VERIFIES CALL 


FROM BASIC 


0128 * IF IT RETURNS PASSED STRING HAS 


0129 * AT LEAST 14 CHARACTERS. X POINTS 


0130 * TO FIRST CHARACTER. 




0131 * 








0132 TEST 


JSR 


$B3BD 


GET VARPTR VALUE lft D 


0133 


TFR 


D,X 


SAVE VALUE 


0134 


LDA 


>x 


CET CHARACTER COUNT 


0135 


CttPA 


014 


must be at least 14 


0136 


BHS 


OK 




0137 


LEAS 


2,S 


CLEAN STACK 


0138 


CLRA 






0139 


LDB 


t-1 


RETURN -1 AS ERROR CODE 


0140 


J?fP 


$B4f4 




0141 OK 


LD1> 


2,X 


GET STRING ADDRESS 


0142 


TFR 


D,X 


PUT IT IN X 


0143 


RTS 






0144 * 








f)14 5 ***********Lj5^p YEAR FLAG SET*************** 


0146 * JUST 


READ 


MONTH AND 


IT WAS JAN OR FEB, X IS 


0147 * POINTING AT Ml. CHECK YEAR FOR LEAF YEAR 


0148 * AND 


SET FUG 


IF SO. 


0149 * 








01 50 LEAP 


PSHS 


A,B 


SAVE VALUES 


0151 


LDB 


-UX 


SEE IF TENS ARE ZERO 


0152 


CMPB 


#'0 




0153 


BNE 


ntleap 


NOT A ZERO 


0154 


CtfPA 


42 


IS MONTH 2 OR 17 


0155 


nirr 


NTLEAF 


AFTER FEBRUARY 


0156 


LGA 


-3,X 


GET Y10 


0157 


SUBA 


#'0 


ilAKK INTO A VALUE 


0158 


LDB 


#10 




0159 


HUL 






0160 


ADDfl 


-2,X 


B NOW HAS YEAR VALUE 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 87 



Software 


7K76 


CO)0 


0161 


SU0B 0'O 


REMOVE ASCII PART OF Yl 


The primary driver software is a 


7E7fl 


COU4 


0162 


SUBLP SUBIi M 


DECREASE BY 4 


machine code program shown in Listing 
1. It is designed to be called from BASIC 


7E7A 
7E7C 


2EFC 
2D09 


0163 
0104 
0165 


BGT SUBLP 
BLT NTLI^P 

* 


NOT ZERO JCEEP REDUCING 
WENT NEGATIVE 


and will both read or set the clock, 






0166 


* IS A LEAP YFAR, READ 


DIG AND SET FLAG AND WRITE 


depending upon the parameters in the 


7E7U 


C603 


0167 


LOB tfsa 


ADDRESS OF D10 


call. I donH propose to talk much here 


7F.80 
7E&1 


SD06 


01G8 
0169 


CLRA 

BSR CLOCK 


PREPARE A FOR READ 
READ D10 


about the assembly code as it is fully 


7E33 


3*84 


0170 


0RA #$84 


SET BIT AND WRITE FLAG 


commented. 


7E85 


8DU2 


0171 


BSR CLOCK 


WRITE IT BACK 


One interesting feature is the handling 


7E87 


3586 


0172 
0173 


* 

WTLFAP PULS A,B S PC 




ol leap year. If the clock is read and 






0174 


********************************************* 


the month is January or February of 






0175 


************* CL0(:K ft^D/^jxt;**************** 


a leap year, the leap year flag is set in 






0176 
OL77 
0178 


********** ** A****** ft ****************** ******* 

* 


the clock. This causes February to have 






* "A" CONTAINS DATA IN 


LOWER 4 BITS* IF KSB^i 


29 days instead of 28. So as long as 






0179 


* THEN WRITES DATA TO ( 


JLOCK, READS FROM CLOCK 


the clock is read at least once during 






0180 


* 




that period, adjustment for leap year 






0181 
0182 


* "U" CONTAINS ADDRESS TO READ/ WRITE FROM 
* 


will be automatic. 






0183 


* ALL ftfiCHSTERS AR& RETURNED UNCHANGED EXCEPT 


Listing 2 is the complete chronograph 






0184 


* A WHEN READING. THEN A HAS ONLY 4 LSBITS SET 


program containing all the necessary 






0185 
0186 


* 
********************************************** 


calls to the driver routine to both read 






0187 


* 




or set the clock. The driver routine from 


FF2* 




0188 


OR EfjU $FF24 




Listing 1 is contained in the data 


FF25 




0189 


CR EQU DR+1 




statements and is POKEd into memory 


0030 




0190 


EXPDDR BqtJ $30 


EXPOSE DATA DIRECTION REG 


0034 




0191 


EXFDR EQU $34 


EXPOSE DATA REGISTER 


each time, This is tor ease ol entry if 


0U7F 




0192 


DA TOUT EQU $7F 


SET LS 4 BITS AS OUTPUTS 


vou do not have an assembler, However, 


00 70 




0193 


DAT1N KOJJ $70 


SET LS 4 BITS AS INPUTS 


it's not the fastest method and you may 


003C 




0194 
0195 
0196 


STROBE EQU $3C 

* 


LET LATCH FOLLOW DATA 


wish to save the driver to its own binary 


7KK9 


3406 


CLOCK PSHS A,H 


PRESERVE REGISTERS 


file and have the basic program load 


lEun 


bdod 


0197 


BSR WRTADD 


WRITE ADDRESS TO LATCH 


it automatically, or perhaps append it 


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6DEA 


0198 


TST ,S 


TEST FOR RRAD OK WRITE 




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88 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



to the end of the BASIC program with 
one of the previously documented 
techniques. 

If you read the comments at the 
beginning of Listing 1, you will see 
exactly how to call the driver and make 
it read or set the chronograph. The 
important points to note are that byte 
14 of the passed string is either a T 
to set the clock or '(F to read it. Those 
are ASCII characters. 

Also note that when setting the 
chronograph, the seconds cannot be 
written and are always set to zero. 
Therefore, enter in the time at the end 
of the current minute as prompted and 
execute the write when this exact time 
is reached. Seconds are returned accu- 
rately when the clock is read. 

Also, the day of the week is stored 
in the chronograph as a number from 
zero to six. Listing 2 arbitrarily sets zero 
to equal Monday. Of course, you can 
set this up however you wish, just 
remember the relationship you used. 

Finally, that wire from pin 3 to pin 
40 on the new PI A provides a one 
second interrupt to the PIA, This 
interrupt is connected to the FIRQ line, 
but the PIA is set up to prevent the 



7E&F 2BD4 
7E91 8058 
7E93 2UQ2 
7K95 HJ>3C 
7E97 3506 
7E*J9 39 



7K9A BOIO 
7K9C F7FK24 
7E9F 863C 
7UA1 B7FF25 
7EM S&34 
7KA6 B7PF25 

?£\9 son 
7EAB 39 



7EAC 8030 
7EAE B7FF25 
7EB1 8fj7F 
7E53 B7FF24 
7KB6 Rf>3£ 
7EBS B7FF25 
7jbiBB 39 



7KRC Bbit) 
7 ERE B7FF25 
?m 8671) 
7EC3 A7FF24 
7EC6 86 Ji 
7ECB B7FF25 
7ECB 39 



0199 
02U0 
0201 
0202 
0203' 
0204 
0205 
0206 
0207 
0208 
0209 
0210 
0211 
0212 
0213 
0214 
0215 
0216 
0217 
021B 
0219 
,02 20 
0221 
0222 
0223 
0224 
0225 
0226 
0227 
0228 
0229 
0230 
0231 
0232 
0233 
0234 
0235 
0236 



WRITING DATA TO CLOCK 
READ DATA FROM CLOCK 

WRITE DATA TO CL0C3C 
RECOVER REGISTERS 



BUI DOWRT 

BSR READ 

BRA EXIT 

DOWRT BRR WRITE 

EXIT POLS A ,8 

K.TS 
************************* *************** 

********3ET OF ADDRESS IN LATCH********* 

********************** ******** B #ff*fr***** 

WKrAflD BSR OUT 

STB DR 

LDA #STROBE 

STA CR 

LDA lEXPDR 

STA CR 

*** ADDRESS DATA IS NOW LOCKED INTO TILE LATCH 

HSR IH SET 4 HITS TO DATA IK 

RXS 
********* ******************************** 

* SET 4 PIA DATA LINES TO OUTPUT 
OUT LDA #EXPDDR 

STA CR 

LDA 0DATOUT 



SET 4 PIA DATA LINES TO OUT 
PUT ADDRESS OUT OF FIA 
LET LATCH SEE IT 

AAD THEN LOCK IT IN 



STA 
LDA 
STA 
RTS 



DR 

0EXPDR 

CR 



BIT 4 LOW EXPOSES 
DATA 0UTFUT 



DDR 



EXPOSE DATA REGISTER 



*********************** ****************** 
* SET 4 PIA DATA LINES TO INPUT 
IN LDA #£XFDDR 



STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
RTS 



CR 
#DATIN 

4EXPDR 
CR 



BIT 4 LOW EXPOSES DDR 
DATA INPUT 

IMPOSE DATA REGISTER 



********** ***************************£*** 
** 1 CLOCK -K117US 



FIT 



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USERS GROUP 



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50322 



OS-9 Trademark ot Microware 



June 1936 THE RAINBOW 89 



CPU from seeing it. However, the flag 
bit In the P1A will indicate each lime 
a second is counted and this can be used. 
For example, the following basic 
program will cause a "beep" once a 
second. It will only work if you have 
read or set the time at least once by 
the program in Listing 2, as this sets 
up the new PIA and the chronograph 
for this feature, 

10 fl=PEEI<(&HFF24):*TG CLERR THE 

INTERRUPT FLAG 
28 IF PEEK(&HFF25)AND &HB0 THEN 

SOUND 1S0,1:GOTD10 ELSE 20 

The flag which tells if there has been 
an interrupt from the chronograph is 
the most significant bit at SFF25. If this 
is one, then a beep is issued and the 
flag is reset by reading SFF24. If not, 
then Line 20 is re-executed until it is. 

Wrapping it up 

1 have deliberately left some of the 
possible uses of the CoCo Chronograph 
to you. If you followed the "Cooking 
with CoCo" series, you could incorpo- 
rate the clock set and read operations 
as basic commands and have the 0RTE5 
function automatically set on power up 
from a read of the clock- You could 
add a TIMES function which would 
return the time of day to BASIC without 
having to do a direct call to the driver 
in Listing 1, 

If you didn't follow the series, there 
are many applications within your 
BASIC programs where knowing the real 
time, date or day of the week could be 
very useful The techniques employed 
in Listing 2 can be used in these cases. 



7UCC C6iE 
7ECE 12 
7ECF 5A 
7r.no 26 FC 
7ED2 39 



7EH3 fl 111) 7 
7ED5 864U 
7BI17 AA62 
7liD9 B7KF24 
7EDC flDfcE 



7£b£ AAIO 
/KKO U7FF24 
7KE3 840F 
7BE5 B7FF24 
7EU.8 6i>n2 
7EEA 39 



7EFB 8G40 
7KED B7FF24 
7EF0 8DDA 



7KF2 SA20 
7EF4 B7FFZ4 
7EF7 F6FF24 
7KIA C40F 
7EFC E762 
7EFE 7FFF24 
7F01 39 



7EO0 



NCI 



0237 
023fi 
0239 
0240 
Q?M 
024 2 
0243 
0244 
0245 
0246 
0247 
0248 
0249 
0250 
0251 
0252 
0253 
0254 
0255 
0256 
0257 
0258 
0259 
0260 
0261 
0262 
0263 
3264 
026 5 
0266 
0267 
02GO 
0269 
0270 
0271 
0272 
0273 
0274 
0275 
0276 
0277 
0278 
0279 
02S0 
0281 
0202 
0283 
EftRDRCS) 



I .117 - 167-55 US DELAY 
#30 DELAY 15GUS 



WAIT 



COUNT DOWN 
7 CLOCK PULSE LOOP 



** 30 * 5 * 
DELAY LDB 
WAIT NOP 

DECS 

ONE 

fcTS 
********************************* 

** A ft A ******* ****** A A A******* ******* ****** 

**********y^ I |-p- tfrATA TO CLOCK************ 
*********** ******#**********« ************ 

* ASSUHKS A13DRBSS IS SET, DATA DIRECTION IS IN, 

* HOLD, READ, WRITE ALL LOW 
* 

WRITE HSR OUT SET DATA TO OUT 

HOLD HIGH 
ADD IN DATA 
SEND IT TO PIA 



* EVERYTHING NOW SET UP TO WRITE 

0RA 0S1O WRITE HIGH 

STA OR 

ANDA 0$OF WRITE LOW, HOLD LOW 

STA DR 

Y\SH IN REST TO DATA IN 

RTS 
******************************** 
A********************-*************-******* 
********** RE A0 fi/yjA FROM CLOCK*********** 
***************************************** 

* ASSUMES ADDRftSS IS SKT, DATA DIRECTION IS IN, 

* HOLD, READ, WRITE ALL LOW 
* 

READ 



RSK 


OUT 


LDA 


#$40 


0RA 


2,S 


STA 


DR 


BSR 


DELAY 



LDA 
STA 
&SR 



#$40 

DR 

DELAY 



HOLD HIGH 

SEND IT TO PIA 



* EVERYTHING NOW SET UP TO READ 

ORA #$20 READ HIGH 

STA DR 

LDB OR 

ANDfi HQF 

STD 2,5 

CLR DR 

RTS 
******************************** 

END PWRCLK 
DETELTED 



GET DATA IN B 
KASK LSB 4 BITS 

PUT RESULT ON STACK 
READ LOW, HOLD LOW 



You will find the CoCo Chronograph 
to be very accurate and the rechargeable 
batteries will keep the clock running for 



months if you don't use your CoCo. 
But it's unlikely your CoCo will remain 
unused for that long! 





*& 




9 NEXT 


CODE 


^ 


rZ 


...178 
...143 


-l 10 GOSUB 89 'INPUT MACHINE 




47 . . 


IF NECESSARY 






64 ... 


...166 


11 CLS 






86 ... 


78 


12 IN*«5TRING*(14,"0") 






END . 


89 


13 MID*(IN*,14,1)- ,, 1" 'TO 


BET WR 


Listing 2: CRNDGRPH 






ITE FLAB 
















14 OUT*-STRING*(14,"0 M ) 


1 CLEAR 200,8tH7DFF 


15 INPUT "READ OR SET TIME 


(R/S) " 


2 DEF FNB(X)=VAL<"«tH"+BYTE*> ; A* 




3 DIM DDW*(6) ,DAYSU2> 


16 IF LEFT*<A*,1)»"S" THEN 


24 


4 DATA MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, 17 GOSUB 76 




THURSDAY , FR I DAY , SATURDAY 


, SUNDAY IB IF RIGHT* (TIME*, 2) -"00" 


THEN 


5 FDR I=0TO6:READDDW*<I) 


iNEXT SOUND 140,1 




6 DATA 31,26,31,30,31,30 


,31,31,3 19 PRINT80, USINB"TIMEi 7. 


7. 


0,31,30,31 


"iTIME* 




7 FOR 1-1 TD 12 


20 PRINTUSING"DAY OF WEEK: 


y. 


B READ DAYSU) 


7." j DOW* (VAL t WEEK*) ) 





90 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



21 PRINTUSING"DATE: X X";DT 
* 

22 PR I NT "PRESS < BREAK > TO END" 

23 GOTO 17 

24 GOSUB 76 

25 A*-LEFT*(TIME*,5) 

26 PRINT"ENTER TIME < " 8 A*; 

27 LINEINPUT") " S K* 

28 IF LEN(K*)>0 THEN A*-K* 

29 IF LEN(A*><>5 THEN 34 

30 IF MID* (A* ,3,1 ><>"!" THEN 34 

31 IF VAL(LEFT*(A*,2))<0 OR VAL ( 
LEFT* (A*, 2)) >23 THEN 34 

32 IF VAL (RIGHT* (A*, 2) )<0 OR VAL 
(RIGHT* (A*, 2) )>59 THEN 34 

33 GOTO 35 

34 SOUNDB0,i:GOTD 24 

35 B*«DOW* (VAL (WEEK*)) 

36 PR I NT "ENTER DAY DF WEEK <"|B* 

; 

37 LINE INPUT") ";K* 

38 IF LEN<K*)>0 THEN B*-K* 

39 FOR 1-0 TO 6 

40 I F B*-LEFT* < DOW* ( I ) , LEN ( B* ) ) 
THEN 42 

41 NEXT: SOUNDS0, It GOTO 35 

42 DOW- I 

43 DATE LOADER 

44 C*-DT* 

45 PRINT"ENTER DATE ("|C*j 

46 LINEINPUT") ";K* 

47 IF LEN<K*)>0 THEN C*-K* 
4B IF LEN (C*) OB THEN 61 

49 D-VAL(MID*(C*,4,2)) 

50 Y-VAL(RI8HT*(C*,2)) 

51 M-VAL(LEFT*(C*,2)) 

52 IF M<0 OR M>12 THEN 61 

53 IF Y<0 THEN 61 

54 IF D<1 THEN 61 

55 IF M-2 THEN 58 

56 IF D>DAYS(M) THEN 61 ELSE 62 

57 ' DO FEBRUARY 

SB IF ( INT ( Y/4X >Y/4) AND (D>DAYS(M 
))THEN 61 

59 ' LEAP YEAR 

60 IF D>29 THEN 61 ELSE 62 

61 SOUND 80, It GOTO 44 

62 D*-STR*(D)t IF LEN(D*)-2 THEN 
MID*(D*,l,l)-"0" ELSE D*-RIQHT*( 
D*,2) 

63 M*«STR*(M)iIF LEN(M*)-2 THEN 
MID*(M*,l,l)-"0" ELSE M*-RIGHT*( 
M*,2) 

64 Y*-STR*(Y)iIF LEN(Y*)-2 THEN 
MID*(Y*,l f l)-"0» ELBE Y*-RIBHT*( 
Y*,2) 

65 MID*(IN*,1,2)-Y* 

66 MID*<IN*,3,2)=M* 

67 MID*(IN*,5,2)«D* 



6B MID* (IN*, 7,1) -RIGHT* (STR* (DOW 
),1) 

69 MID*<IN*,S,2)=LEFT*<A*,2) 

70 MID*UN*,10,2)*MID*(A*,4,2) 

71 MID*(IN*,12,2)-"00" 

72 INPUT "PRESS < ENTER > TO SET CL 
OCK";A* 

73 A-USR (VARPTR ( IN*) ) 

74 IF AO0 THEN PRIN^'ERROR'-iSTO 
P 

75 CLS:BOTO 17 

76 ' READ TIME ROUTINE 

77 T*=MID*(0UT*,12,2) 

78 A>=USR ( VARPTR ( OUT* ) ) 

79 IF AO0 THEN PRINT"ERROR"iSTO 
P 

80 IF MID* (OUT*, 12, 2) -T* THEN 78 

81 TIME* - MID* (OUT*, 8, 2)+ +MI 

D*(OUT*,10,2)+"|"+MID*(OUT*,12,2 
) 

82 WEEK* -MID* (OUT*, 7,1) 

B3 DT* - MID*(0UT*,3,2)+"/ ,, +MID* 
<OUT*,5,2)+"/"+MID*<OUT*,l,2) 
B4 RETURN 

85 DATABD, 47, C6,0C,A6, 00,80,30, 3 
4,02,6D,E4,27,0C,A6,B0,80,30,8A, 
B0,Cl,05,26,02,8A,08,BD,6D,6D f E4 
,26,16,C1,09,26,02,BD,3B,C1,05,2 
6,04,84,03,20,04,C1,0B,27,F8,8A, 
30,A7,80,5A,2A,Dl,32 f 61,C6,0F,8D 
,SB,C6,20,F7,FF,24,4F,5F,7E,B4,F 
4,BD,B3,ED,1F,01,A6,84 

86 DATA81,0E,24,0B,32,62,4F,C6,F 
F,7E,B4,F4,EC f 02,lF,01,39,34,06, 
E6, IF, CI, 30, 26, IE, 81, 02, 22,1 A, A6 
,1D,80,30,C6,0A,3D,EB,1E,C0,30,C 
0,04,2E,FC,2D,09,C6,08,4F,BD,06, 
8A,84,8D,02,35,B6,34,06,aD,0D,6D 
,E4,2B,04,BD,5B,20,02,BD,3C,35,0 
6,39, 8D, 10, F7,FF, 24,86 

87 DATA3C,B7,FF,25,86,34,B7,FF,2 
5,8D,11,39,B6,30,B7,FF,25,86,7F, 
B7 ,FF, 24, 86, 34, B7.FF, 25, 39,86,30 
,B7,FF,25,86,70,B7,FF,24,86,34,B 
7,FF,25,39,C6,1E,12,5A,26,FC,39, 
8D,D7,86,40,AA,62,B7,FF,24,BD,EE 
,8A,10,B7,FF,24,84,0F,B7,FF,24,8 
D, 02,39,86, 40, B7,FF, 24 

88 DATA8D,DA,BA,20,B7,FF,24,F6,F 
F,24,C4,0F,E7,62,7F,FF,24,39 

B9 'LOAD MACHINE CODE ROUTINE 

90 FOR I-&H7E00 TO &H7F01:READ B 
YTE*s POKE I ,FNB(0) a TTL-TTL+FNB (0) 
:NEXT 

91 IF TTL02B319 THENPRINT"ERROR 
IN DATA STATEMENTS "i STOP 

92 DEF USR-&H7E00 

93 RETURN 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 91 



16k 
ECB 




RAINBOV^J 



Your very own music teacher 



Learn The Ivory Keyboard 
With Piano Note Tutor 



By Ron Mix 



Usually, the first problem encountered when 
trying to learn how to play the piano is to 
learn what note on the music staff goes with 
what key on the piano keyboard. The Piano Note 
Tutor is designed to assist in learning the notes and 
the piano keyboard in a game-type format. 

The tutor has been tested by the piano students 
who are privately taught by my wife in individual 
lessons, group lessons and by students alone. (Note 
to piano teachers: The tutor is a great game to use 
while one student is waiting to be picked up or while 
waiting for his or her lesson.) 

Came Summary 

The Piano Note Tutor gives a note on either the 
treble or bass staff and asks you to find the correct 
key on a shortened 54-note piano keyboard. The 
program gives you 15 seconds in which to position 
a pointer at the correct keyboard key using the up, 
down, right and left arrows. The 15 seconds are 

counted off in one 

second intervals by the 

program through the 

50UN0 command. Of 

course, the faster you 

are, the more points 

you get. 
The game also has 

three levels of play 

(Ron Mix is the indus- 
trial engineering man- 
agerfor Switches, fnc. 
He is in the process of 
developing educational 
software for his wife, 
Rohhin t who leaches 
private piano lessons 
and religion in the 
public schools,) 



~V~ 




which include major notes only, sharp and flat notes 
only, and combined play. The more difficult the play t 
the higher the points for each correct answer, and 
in the combined play, more points are taken off for 
an incorrect answer. 

Program Play 

After loading the program into the computer, type 
RUN. A title screen will appear for a few seconds while 
the character generator data is read into the program. 
The main menu appears and a short description is 
given about the game, then the levels of play menu 
is displayed. After entering your levels of play 
selection, the game graphics will start to be drawn 
on the screen. The Piano Note Tutor should display 
a buff background, white and black piano keyboard 
keys with a red 'C 1 marking the Middle C keyboard 
key, and a red pointer. If these colors are not being 
displayed correctly, press the Reset button on your 
computer and retype RUN after the OK prompt. 
My computer usually 
starts up with the cor- 
rect colors but can be 
finicky at times. 

After the graphics 
are drawn, the pro- 
gram will give you 
your note to be placed 
using the various ar- 
row keys. The program 
then waits for your 
move and /or answer 
while counting the sec- 
onds for you. To end 
a game or to return to 
the main menu, press 
the shift and clear 
keys at the same time. 
If your answer is 
wrong, the program 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



MOVE UP TO THE NEW STANDARD 
IN COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE... 

COLOR CONNECTION III! 



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Radio Shack Deluxe RS232 program pack? 



* Your dumb software wont work with a smart modem? 

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* Or Automatic XON/XOFF protocol that downloads 
direct to disk? 

* Your software does not support auto answer/auto dial 
with both Hayes compatible and the Radio Shack 
modems? 

RSDOS disk only S4&95 

Requires 32K. 64K yields maximum buffer size. 



COLOR CONNECTION III CAN!!! 

In addition to sll of these new capabilities, it still has all of those neat features of Color Connection II like 
single key macros for often-used numbers, a 51 x 24 screen. "Introduction to Communications," and more 



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CompuServe Starter Kit 



The CompuServe Information Service 
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MODEMS 




VOLKS MODEM It is direct 

connect, bell 103 compatibie, full or half 
duplex, and has a voice data switch. It 
runs on a 9 volt battery so no plug is 
required! The special CoCo cable is in- 
cluded, [Required battery not included.) 

$84.95 



■ Auto Answer 

* Auto Dial 

* Direct Connect 

* Bell 103 com- 
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•110 to 300 baud 



• Hayes Smart- 
modem com- 
patible 

■ Full or Half Duplex 

■ CoCo cabie in- 
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$159,00 



will flash the right answer and wait for 
any key to be pressed while you examine 
thu correct answer before continuing 
with another question. 

Game Play Hints and Notes 

i) The program assumes that it will 
take two seconds to move the 
pointer to the correct answer. 

2} If an answer is not entered by 
pressing the space bar within 20 
seconds, the program assumes the 
answer is wrong and will show you 
the correct answer. 

3) To return ai any time to the main 
menu, press the SHIFT and CLEAR 
keys together. 

4) The minimum and maximum 
number of points given for an 
answer in either game is given 
below: 



Correct 
Answer 



Incorrect 
Answer 



Min. Max. Min, Max. 



Game Level I 
Game Level 2 
Game Level 3 



+ 1 
+2 
+5 



+ 10 
+20 
+50 







-5 







-50 



The maximum correct points will be 
scored if the answer is correct and 
entered before two seconds elapse, 
while the minimum correct points are 
scored if entered after 17 seconds elapse. 
Likewise, the minimum number of 
Level 3 incorrect points are scored after 
17 seconds while the minimum number 
of points are scored if entered before 
two seconds elapse. Points between the 
minimum and maximum are dependent 
upon the lime elapsed between two and 
17 seconds, 

System Requirements 

Piano Note Tutor requires 16K 
Extended Color basic and was pro- 
grammed using a silver/ gray 64K Color 
Computer with a Color basic 1.1 ROM 
and an Extended BASIC 1.0 ROM. The 
tutor was tested on a 16K Color 
Computer 2 with a Color basic 1.2 
ROM and an Extended BASIC 1.1 ROM 
with no problems, Since the seconds 
counter (lines 260 through 290, and 690 
through 715) was based on the TIMER 
function instead of a FOR statement 



loop, the ROM compatibility can be 
maintained. 

The high speed poke (POKEG5495.0) 
is used in Line 9000 with the return to 
low speed poke (PDKEG54g4 t 0) used in 
Line 9020. The high speed is used only 
to speed up the program graphics 
character generator. Therefore, if your 
Color Computer cannot handle the high 
speed pokes, remove these pokes from 
their respective lines without fear of 
ruining the program, 



(Mr. Mix has also developed a Staff 
Note Tutor which is similar to Piano 
Note Tutor, however, it gives you a key 
on the piano keyboard and you must 
place the correct note on the grand staff. 
For a copy of Staff Note Tutor, send 
$5 and a blank cassette tape to 2020 
Chieftain Row, Logansport, IN 46947.) 



fr^frjA fr 



Y? 140 ... 


.203 -, 


V 220 . , . 


...207 


380 . . . 


,. .129 


480 ... 


...233 


8040 . . 


...155 


9060 .. 


4 


9220 . . 


....31 


END.. 


.199 





The listing: NOTETUTR 



IB DIM U<8,14) ,T(2) ,B(B,14) 'PIAN 

TUTOR BY ROBB1N AND RON MIX NO 

V. 1984, (C) 19B5 

11 DIM W<6,14> 

20 R=RND (-TIMER) s CLSs PRINT«200, " 

PIANO NOTE TUTOR" ; PR INTS236, " (C) 
19B5" : PRINTG271 , "BY" IPRINT0295, 

"RON AND ROBBIN MIX" : GOSUBB000I F 

ORX=1TO400:NEXTX 

30 BOTO100 

100 CLSsPRINT"FIND THE NOTE SAME 
INSTRUCTIONS 

THE OBJECT OF TH 

IS GAME IS TO FIND THE CORRECT K 

EYBOARD NOTE FROM A GIVEN STAFF 
NOTE. MOVE THE POINTER TO THE 
RIGHT KEY BY US I NO THE RIGHT, LE 

FT, UP, AND DOWN"; 

110 PR I NT "ARROWS, THEN PRESS <SP 

ACE BAR> TO ENTER YOUR ANSWER. 

IF WRONG, THE COMPUTER WILL SHOW 
THE RIGHT ANSWER, THEN PRESS ANY 
KEY TO CONTINUE. PRESS < SHI FT 

> AND < CLEAR > TOGETHER TO RE 



TURN TO MAIN PROGRAM MENU. " 

120 PRINTe4B3,"PRESS ANY KEY TO 

CONTINUE"; 

130 I*-INKEY*:IFI*-""THEN130 

135 IFI*=CHR*(92)THEN30 

1 40 BOSUB8050 : PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS5 : SCR 

EEN1 , 1 : PM0DE3 , 1 s COLOR 1 s KT=1 IBs BO 

SUBS030 s DRAW " C3S4BM 1 26 , 1 68 " : A*= " 

C" ! GQSUB9000: COLOR 1 ! SC=0: AS- "SCO 

RE" : DRAW "S8BM 190, 12" i GOSUB9000: A 

*-STR* (SO : DRAW "BM 190, 28" i G0SUB9 

000 : At- " F I ND " : DRAW " BM0 ,12": GOSUB 

9000 

145 A*-" THE" : DRAW"BM6,2B" : G0SUB9 

000 s A** " NOTE " : DRAW " BM0 , 44 " : GOSUB 

9000 s DRAW " S4BM 1 28 , 1 72 " +AU* : DRAW " 

CI " s LX-128: LY=172sGET C 124, 172) - < 

133,187) ,U, Gi GET < 124, 172)- (131,1 

87) ,W,G:GET(110,172)-(119,187) ,B 

150 LT=0: LINE (68,40)- (68,64) ,PRE 

SET:FORX=40TO64STEP6sLINE(6B,X)- 

( 1 22 , X ) , PRESET : NEXTX : F0RX-2BTO76 

STEP6: LINE (122,X)-< 146, X) ,PRESET 

s NEXTX s R-RND ( 2 ) : RA-RND < 19 ) : RB=RN 

D(2) sRC=RND<4)s IF R»2 THEN DRAW" 

S4BM7B,6B"+CT* ELSE DRAW"S4BM7B, 

46"+CB$ 

160 DRAWBM131 ,79" I FORX-1TORA: DR 

AW'BM-O^S-sNEXTXiIF RA<10 THEN 

DRAW NU* ELSE DRAW ND* 

170 IF 1=1 THEN200 ELSE IF 1-3 A 

ND RC>2 THEN 200 



94 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 







The Final Answer in 
Data Base Managers... 

DATA BANK 



. 



FOR 64K USERS 



If you want a data base that does it your way t then 
Data Bank is for yogi With Dala Bank, you are the 
boss. You define your own display screen, record 
formats, calculated fields, sort sequences, selection 
criteria, and report formats. 



Each record can contain up to 512 characters in up 
to 35 fields, ample for any application, Data types 
include alphanumeric, math (for real numbers), 
date, and "derived" (values calculated by your 
own defined formulas!) The size of your data base 
is limited only by your disk space. To aid in sorting 
and selecting, you can define up to 9 different 
"access keys," each with up to 3 levels. Using 
logical operators (less than, greater than, equal, 
or, and) you can select any subset of your data 
base for printing, Data Bank lets you design 
customized reports to fit your individual needs and 
can save up to 9 defined formats for repeated use. 
You may include page headings, titles, automatic 
page numbers, column headings, totals for numeric 
ields, and more 




Even with all its power, Data Bank is very easy i 
use* It goes far beyond the average data base Dy 
adding features like calculated fields, three level 
sorts, easy interface with Dynacafc, powerful file 
manipulation utilities, access to all OS-9 com- 
mands, Word-Pak compatibility, easy access to 
user programs, easy expansion of record fries, and 
morel There is no other data base system as com- 
prehensive as Data Bank! 

Requires 64K & Disk Drive $79.98 
{OS-9 not required. Will run with OS^9) 






SPECIAL OFFER: We at Gomputerware understand how you 
couid have purchased some other data base software before 
Data Bank, but we're going to help you correct your mistake. 

Send us the original disk of your current data base software 
and we'll give you S20 OFF your purchase of Data Bank' 

Offers expires June 30, 1985 



COMPUTERWARE 




RQ. Box 668 * Encinitas, CA 92024 
(619)436-3512 



Disk Fix & OS-9 Utilities 




Use your drives to the fullest and unleash the real power of OS-9! Now when you boot OS 9. your drives wilt be 
configured to their maximum capacity - double or single sided, up to 40 Or 80 tracks, and step rates of up to 6 ms. 
These utilities make it easy to inspect and modify any disk file, change drive descriptors, display Or compare disk files 
along with mass copying of all or part of a disk, 
Requires G4K & OS-9 $29.95 



Thi$ impressive set ol utilities includes every tool you need for manipulating, teal Was, SsVflfSl utilities help with 
searching a.id replacing text strings; customized compression and uncompression techniques: complete formatting ol 
yaur listings with file' name page number, dale, and time; conversions oet ween upper and lower case ; easy tunings 
lor oench marking; character counts for quick sire estimates; ajfd m0ri! You won't be able to work with OS-9 tetf fifes 
withoul your Textools? 
Requires 64K & 0S*9 S29.9S 



Textoots 
tor OS-9 



Synther 77 

mm iiiiimmm 




jfMnv-'li 



Turn your Color Computer into a musical instrument with this complete digital synthesizer software! Collect a whole 
music library fay saving your creations on dish or tape. For the novice, play the keyboard like a piano. For the musician, 
control vibrato, cender, bomg, volume, and attack, By modifying attack, sustain, decay and . Mease rates, you can 
Create nearly any ASDR envelope! It is a solo synthesizer, optimised for one voice just like most instruments and ihe 
Moog synthesizer. Synther 77 can be line-tuned to match other instruments or Color Computers, You can start a band! 
Synther 77 is as easy or complete as your desires! 
Requires 32K Cass $24.95 Disk £27,35 



The 64K Color Computer can have a 64 x 24 or 51 x 24 upper and lower case oisplBy without hardware mods! Use H 
with BASIC and assembly language programs that use text displays. Indudea is a character editor so you can change 
any ol the characters, h does not affect your software. Stays even after resetting, and looks great even on a TV, Special 
features include mixingof text & tik&s graphics, auto repeal keys, lype ahead, two PRINT @ commands, ON ERROR, 
win line numbering, and an enhanced PMODE that allows you to specify page the start page. You 1 !! wonder how 
you ever worked without it! 
Requires G4K Cass %ZAM Disk 327.95 

Computerware tea federally registered trademark rM Compute ware, 



*4K 



0! 



iemaric of Micro ware. 



180 DRAW"BM105,B0 ,, iFQRX-lTORA:DR 

AW"BM-0,-3":NEXTX:IF RB-1 THEN D 

RAW FS* ELBE DRAW SS$ 

190 IF RB=1 THEN LT— 4 ELSE LT-4 

200 LT=LT+(B#RA)+<96*R)-96:F0RX= 

12T0236STEP56sIF LT-X THEN 250 E 

LSE NEXTX 

220 FQRX-36TO204STEP56: IF LT-X T 

HEN 250 ELSE NEXTX 

240 GOTO260 

250 IF RB=1 THEN LT-LT-4 ELSE LT 

-LT+4 

260 TA=8:SOUND90,l:TIMER-0 

270 I*=INK£Y*:IF 1*="" THEN 2B0 

ELSE 310 

2B0 IF TIMER>60 THEN TA»TA+INT(T 

IMER/60)iSQUND90,liTIMER-0:IF TA 

>19 THEN 430 ELSE 270 

290 BDTQ270 

310 IF I*=CHR*(92) THEN 30 

320 IF I*=CHR*(32) THEN 430 

330 IF I*=CHR*<8) THEN PUT(LX-4, 

LY)-(LX+5,LY+15) ,B,PSET:LX-LX-Bi 

BOTD3B0 

340 IF I*-CHR*(9> THEN PUT<LX-4, 

LY)-(LX+5,LY+15) ,B, PSETi LX-LX+Bi 

BQTO3B0 

350 IF I*=CHR*(94) AND LY-172 TH 



L 



-*>\ 



MicnoWorld n 



] 



Laneco Plaza Clinton, NJ 08809 

(201)735-9560 

Call or write lor Price List 

LOW PRICES ON 100% 
Radio Shack Equipment 

(with full warranty) 

New Slimline Drive $270.00 

New Slimline Drive 1 $165.00 

Both $435.00, Installed $445.00 

Prices include shipping! 

16K Standard $107.00 

16K Extended $134.00 

64K $178.00 

Diskettes $1.50 each 

Flip N Files $19.96 

Library Cases..... $3.00 

10% off Computerware 
15% off Radio Shack Hardware 



EN PUT(LX-4,LY)-(LX+5,LY+15) ,B,P 

SET: LY-102: LX-LX+4S GOTO3B0 

360 IF I*=CHR$(10) AND LY=102 TH 

EN PUT(LX-4,LY)-<LX+5,LY+15) ,B,P 

SET: LY-172: LX-LX-4: B0T0380 

370 GOTO270 

3B0 IF LX<B AND LY=172 THEN LX-B 

: GOTO420 

390 IF LX>248 AND LY-172 THEN LX 

-24B:GDTO420 

400 IF LX<4 AND LY-102 THEN LX-4 

: BOTQ420 

410 IF LX=>252 AND LY-102 THEN L 

X=252s PUT (LX-4,LY) - <LX+3,LY+15> , 

W,PSET:GOTO270 

420 PUT (LX-4, LY)-(LX+5,LY+15),U, 

PSETIGDT0270 

430 TA-17-TAi IF TA<0 THEN TA-0 E 

LSE IF TA>15 THEN TA-15 

440 IF LT-LX THEN C0L0R4sLINE< 19 
0,16) -(255,28) ,PBET,BF: DRAW "C 188 
BM50 , 1 00 " : A*- " 6D0D WORK " : GOSUB90 
00!SC-SC4-(T(I-1)/10>+INT((TA/13> 
*. 9#T ( 1-1 ) ) l DRAW" BM 190 , 2B" ELSE 
450 

441 IF S09999 THEN SC-SC-9999 
445 A*-STR* (SO : GOSUB9000: FORX-1 
TG600: NEXTX s C0L0R4: LINE (0, 84) - (2 
55, 100) ,PSET,BF: LINE (68, 15) - ( 146 
, 84 ) , PSET , BF : COLOR 1 s GOTO 1 50 

450 IF 1-3 THEN C0L0R4s LINE ( 190, 

16>-(255,2B) , PSET , BF l COLOR llSC-S 

C-50+(TA»3) :DRAW"SBBM190,28"( IF 

SC<-9999 THEN SC-SC+9999: A*-STR* 

(SC):GO5UB9000 ELSE A*=STR*(SC): 

GO5UB9000 

460 DRAWSBBM5, 100": A*=" NICE TRY 

-ANSWER IS"jGQSUB9000 

465 IF LT-252 THEN PUT (LT-4, 102) 

-(LT+3,117),W,PSET:LZ=102:GOTO48 



470 IF LT/B-INT(LT/8) THEN PUT(L 

T-4 f 172>-(LT+5,1B7) ,U,PSET;LZ-17 

2 ELSE PUT(LT-4,102)-(LT+5,117> , 

U, PSET :LZ- 102 

480 I*«INKEY*iIF I*-"" THEN FORX 

-1T045: NEXTX! PUT (LT-4,LZ>-(LT+5 

,LZ+15> ,B,PSETs FORX- 1TO 15s NEXTX: 

G0T0465 

490 IF I*-CHR*(92> THEN 30 ELSE 

C0L0R4: LINE (0,84) - (256, 100) ,PSET 

,BF:LINE(6B,15)-(146,84> ,PSET,BF 

:C0LQRlsPUT<LT-4,LZ)-(LT+5,LZ+15 

) , B, PSET t GOTO 150 

B000 DIM L*(29>,M*(29>:FORX-0TO2 

9: READ L*(X) ,M* (X) i NEXTX 

8010 ND*-"R6DL4DR4DL4DR4DL4DR4L6 

U6D1B" : NU*-"R4DL4DR4DL4DR4DL4DR6 

U 18" : SS#="NL4NU4NR8NDBD4R4NLBNUB 



96 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 






NAP Monochrome Monitors 

This great T2" monochrome monitor 
is the perfect match for the CoCo, The 
20 mhz band width, 800 Ime resolution, 
and 80 x 25 display insure a cnsp pit> 
I u re to r word processi ng , p rog ram m h g , 
or just fun Pius - it has audio input! 



NAP 12" 
NAP 12' 



Green 
Amber 



S1 04.95 
$114.95 




^txah ^^^) i^-n n ^TT^O^?} r^ 5 ^ ^ — ^ ^^^^^^^^^ 



SANYO COLOR MONITOR 

This monitor has eve rything ! It 
includes COLOR composite video, 
MONOCHROME COLOR, ana RGB 
(for IBM and other computer systems). 
The display is excellent and audio 
is included 



1irmi1tttii*rrt*ff 



Put a Monitor on Ybur CoCo 
with Video Plus 



You can enjoy the crisp display of a 
composite video monitor using our 
Video Plus Interface, Each is fully 
assembled and tested, installation is 
quick, easy, and requires no soldering. 
Your TV output is not disabled by the 
Video Plus Audio output is also 
provided. 



Tr=fr 



5249.95 
plus $15 shipping 



I 



Video Plus I £24-95 

interfaces the original model 
of Color Computer to any 
composite video monitor 
(color or monochrome). 

Video Plus HC $34.95 

interfaces the Color Computer II 
with either a color or monochrome 
composite video monitor. 
Computer must have video chip 
in socket 



Video Pius IIU 534.91 

interfaces the newest Color 
Computer If (model £6-3134 & 
newer) with either a coior or 
monochrome composite video 
monitor. Specially designed for 
those computers with vjdeo chips 
soldered rather than socketed. 



PROWRITEFT 7500 At only S249 plus $12 shipping, 
( we've yet to find a competitor.) 



This lightweight printer zips along at 54 futf lines per minute, It gives 
you bidirectional printing, and high resolution graphics in the blink of an eye. 
Comes with a full year's warranty, backed by C. Itch's nationwide service centers. 



Sir 



DISK 

SYSTEMS 

includes J & M controller, DOS manual, 
cabinet, power supply, naff-s^e double 
density drive. & all cables, Pnces are 
quoted for JDOS Add $10 for RSDOS. 
Add $30 for HDS switchable controller 
or add $45 for J & M Switchable con- 
troller with printer port. 

Single drive. Single sided S299.Q0 

Single drive, Double sided $359.00 

Dual drives, Singled sided $419.00 

Dual drives, Double sided 5499.00 



Adding On 

Each includes half sj zed drive(s) in 
cabinet with extender. 

Single drive, Single sided $210.00 

Single drive, Double Srded $249.00 

Dual drives, Singled sided $329.00 

Dual drives. Double sided 5399,00 




Supplies 
Diskettes: (hi -quality, double density with 



J & M controller w/JDOS 
J a M controller w/RSDOS 
(JSM w/printer port add $10) 
S w itc h able co nt rol le r w/J DO S 
& RSDOS 
HDS 
J & M w/ printer port 



$124,95 
$1 34.95 



$154.95 
S 169,96 



hub rings 

Disk head cfoa ner kit 
Amdisk cartridge 



3-paK 
10 pak 

Each 
10-pak 



10.95 

19.95 

9.95 

5.00 

4000 



Computerware ia a federally regi*ter*d 
trademark of Compulenware. 




Kraft Joystick 

Dual-axis trim control, linear poten- 
tiometers for more precise control, 
toggle switch selection between spring 
center or free floating modes, and trim- 
mer adjustments. It is plug-in compatible, 

Reg. $39.95 Now S24.95 



Call or Write to: 



I 

Name 




COMPUTERWARE lttm 

K^SfT- (619) 436-3512 

Box 668 • Encinitas, CA • 92024 



I 



I 



WICO Joystick Adapter 

Allows use of any two Atari compatible 
joysticks, S1995 

CCP-1 Serial/Parallel 
Printer Interface from Botek 

$59.95 

CCP-2 Printer & Modem Interface 
from Botek $74,00 




Address 

City 

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_State^ 
CoCo 



-Zip_ 



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Item 



=•? 



Format 



Shipping: 6% Calif. Sales Tax 

Surface — $2 minimum. COD Add $5 

2% for orders over $100 Shipping* 

Air or Canada — $5 minimum. TOTAL 

5% for orders over $100 
Checks are delayed for bank clearance 



Price 



J 



NR4ND4 " i FB*= " R4DLDLDLDLDLU 1 2 " 

801 1 AU**="C3NG3RNF3LDNG3RNF3LD13 

NH3RNE3LUNH3RNE3" 

B020 CT*«"U2L2D2F3R2E3U6HU2HU2HU 

2HU2HU2HU4E3F3D4LDLDLDLDLDLDLDLD 

LDLD6LU5RD6F2R6URURURURU4H3L2G3D 

3F2" s CB*="U2R2D3L3ULULULURURUR6D 

RDRDRD6LD2LD2LD2LD2LD2L2D2BU20BR 

12R3DL3DR3BD6L3UR3UL3" : RETURN 

8030 LINE(0,KT>-<256,KT) ,PSET:LI 

NE (0,KT+52> - <256,KT+52) ,PSETs FOR 

X-4TD252STEPB : L I NE < X , KT ) - < X , KT+5 

2) ,PSET:NEXTX 

8040 LINE<2,KT)-<7,KT+33> ,PSET,B 

Fs F0RX-18T0242STEP56: LINE <X ,KT) - 

<X+3,KT+33) ,FSET,BF:LINE<X+S,KT> 

-<X+13,KT+33) ,PSET,BF:NEXTX:FaRX 

-42TD2 1 0STEP5& : FORY=0TO 1 6STEPB : L 

INE(X+Y,KT)-(X+Y+5,KT+33> ,PSET,B 

F: NEXTY: NEXTX : RETURN 

8050 CLS: PRINT" LEVELS QF SAME P 

LAY SELECTIONS 

1 -MAJOR NOTES ON 

LY <MAX +10 POINTS IF COR 
RECT AND QUICK ENOUGH TO BEA 
T THE CLOCK > 2-SHARP AND FLAT 

NOTES ONLY" 
8060 PRINT" <MAX +20 POINTS I 
F CORRECT AND QUICK TO BEAT 

THE CLOCK > 3-ALL NOTES <MAX +5 
POINTS IF CORRECT AND VE 
RY QUICK TO BEAT THE CLOCK, M 
AX -50 IF WRONG AND SLOW>": 
PRINT@450,"ENTER YOUR SELECTION 
NUMBER" 

8070 I*-INKEY*:IFI*-""THEN8070 
8080 IFI*-CHR*(92)THEN30 
8090 IF VAL(I*)<1 THENS070 
SI 00 IF VAL<I*)>3 THEN8070 
8110 I-VAL(I*):T<0»=»10:T<l)»20iT 
<2>«50sRETURN 

9000 P0KE65495 , ' CHR . GEN . FROMTRS 
-90NEWS4/S2 

9010 DRAWB*sFOR X-l TO LEN<Af)«F 
OR Y-0 TO 29: IF MID*<A*,X , 1 > »L*< 
Y> THEN DRAW M*<Y> 
9020 NEXTY: NEXTX: PDKEA5494,0! RET 
URN 

9030 DATA " 'V'BM+7,0" 
9040 DATA "A","U4E2F2D2NL4D2;BM+ 
3 0" 
9060 DATA "C" , "BM+1 ,-0; H1U4E1R2F 

l;BM+0,+4;BlL2;BM+6,0" 

9070 DATA "D" , "U6R3F1D4G1L3; BM+7 

,0" 

9080 DATA "E" , "NR4U3NR2U3R4jBM+3 

+6" 
9090 DATA "F'V'U3NR2U3R4sBM+3,+6 



9100 DATA "G","BM+1,-0;H1U4E1R2F 
l;BM+0,+2;NLlD2GlL2;BM+6,0" 
9110 DATA "H","U3NU3R4NU3D3;BM+3 

i0" 

9120 DATA "I","BM+l f 0;RlNRlU6NLl 

RljBM+4,+6" 

9140 DATA "K","U3NU3RlNE3F3sBM+3 

,0" 

9150 DATA "L","NU6R4Ul;BM+3,+l" 

9170 DATA "N","U6F1D1F2D1F1NU6;B 

M+3,0" 

9180 DATA "O","BM+l f 0;HlU4ElR2Fl 

D4GlL2;BM+6*0" 

9190 DATA "P" ,"U6R3FlDlSlL3:BM+7 

3" 
9210 DATA "R","U6R3FID1G1L2NL1F3 
;BM+3,0" 

9220 DATA "S" , "BM+0,-1 ; F1R2E1U1H 
lL2HlUlElR2Fl;BM+3»+5" 
9230 DATA "T" , "BM+2 f +0;U6NL2R2jB 
M+3,+6" 
9260 DATA "W" , "NU6E2NUlF2U6jBM+3 

6" 
9280 DATA "Y'V'BM+0,-6sD2F2ND2E2 
U2;BM+3,6" 

9300 DATA " 1","BM+1,0;R1NRIU6B1; 
BM+6,+5" 

9310 DATA "2","NR4U1E1R1E2U1H1L2 
Gl| BM+7, +5" 

9320 DATA "3" , "BM+0,-1 ;F1R2E1H2E 
2HlL3;BM+7,6" 

9330 DATA "4" , "BM+3,0|U2NR1L3U1E 
3D3sBM+4 t 3" 

9340 DATA "5" , "BM+0,-1 ;F1R2E1U2H 
lL3U2R4;BM+3,+6" 

9350 DATA "6" , "BM+4,-5;HlL2GlD4F 
1R2E1U1H1L3jBM+7,+3" 
9360 DATA "7" ,"UlE4UlL4;BM+7,+6" 
9370 DATA "8" , "BM+1 ,-0?HlUlElHlU 
lElR2FiDlGlNL2FlD161L2|BM+6,0" 
9380 DATA "9" , "BM+0,-1 ;F1R2E1U4H 
lL261DlFlR2;BM+4,+3" 
9390 DATA "0" , "BM+1 ,0jHlU4ElR2Fl 
D4GlL2;BM+6,0" 
94B0 DATA "-" ,"BM+0,-3|R4jBM+3,+ 




FLORIDA 
SEARCH NO LONGER! 

The Software Connection n\ 

Fori Lauderdale is your one stop source 

for your Color Computer Software 

Peripherals Books Magazines & Repass 



.Software 
Connection 

4301 N STATE RO «7 
LAUDERDALE LAKES, FL 33319 

305-4M-7547 




98 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



Granny's 
Peg- 



Game 



Challenge 



By Daryl Judd 




One of the memories of going to 
my grandmother's house is 
playing the puzzle-type game 
called Hi-Q. [fs a small, while board 
with 44 red pegs that are jumped back 
and forth in checker-type moves. The 
object (which 1 could never seem to 
master) is to end up with only one peg 
in the middle. 

I recently found out that my wife's 
grandmother also has the game. Is it 
possible this game is a requirement of 
some grandmothers' union? Perplexed, 



(Daryl Judd directs the news at KIV1 
TV channel six in Nampa, Idaho. He 
works on his computer in his spare 
time.) 



I pondered over this thought for several 
days. Then, 1 realized my mission: to 
bring the CoCo world the game of Hi- 
Q — for those whose grandmothers 
didn't belong to the union. 

I added sight and sound and in 
completing my mission, I had to call 
on several tactics 1 have picked up in 
the past (past issues of rainbow, that 
is) such as the false colors of PMODE 
3 and GET and PUT statements. 

The variables are as follows: 

'A' is the array used to draw the pegs 

*ET is the array used to erase the pegs 

Num is the number of pegs left 

fc M" is the x starting point of the 

cursor square 

V V is the y starting point of the cursor 

square 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 99 



The listing: hi -Q 



r» 


,.,.69 


40 


...179 


73 


...,,8 


104 ... 


...191 


130 ... 


,,.117 


156 . 


,♦.157 


END . . 


....33 


T 



1 'H-Q BY DARYL JUDD 

2 PM0DE3,lsPCLS: SCREEN 1, : CQLQR2 
i2 

3 DRAW"BM0,30; D120; R30; USB; R50; D 
90} R30J U120; L30; D50| L30J U50I L30" 

4 PAINT<2,32) ,3,2 

5 CIRCLE(190,B9) ,36,2, 1.15, .1705 

..11 

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100 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



14 SCREEN 1,1 

15 PLAY II LB;02E;P4,LB. )D1A|P16)LB 
;02C;L4;01B;PB;LaG 11 

16 FDRX^lT0700sNEXTX 

1 7 CLS s PR I NT@7 , " ft* I NSTRUCT I DNS*# 
ii 

IB PRINT" THE OBJECT OF THIS GAM 
E IS TO" 

19 PRINT" END UP WITH ONE PEG I 
N THE" 

20 PR I NT "CENTER HOLE. PEGS ARE S 
UBTRACTED"; 

21 PRINT" FROM THE BOARD BY JUMP 
ING, LIKE"| 

22 PRINT" IN THE GAME OF CHECKE 
RS. TO" 

23 PRINT" MOVE THE SQUARE WHERE 
YOU WANT" 

24 PRINT" IT, PRESS THE ARROW KE 
YS. TO" 

25 PRINT" JUMP, PRESS THE ' J ' K 
EY. AND" 

26 PRINT" THEN THE ARROW KEY IN 
THE 11 

27 PRINT" DIRECTION YOU WANT TO 
MOVE. " 

2B PRINT" WHEN THERE ARE NO MORE 
MOVES , " 

29 PRINT" PRESS THE W FOR YOUR 
RATING. " 

30 PRINT" AND IF WANT TO QUIT, P 
RESS THE" 

31 PRINT" *Q' KEY AND YOU WI 
LL." 

32 PRINT" ##ANY KEY#»"; 

33 I *= I NKE Y* s I F I *- " " THEN33 

34 PM0DE3,1:PCLSB 

35 CIRCLEU0, 10) ,7,3,-9 

36 PAINT(10,10) ,3,3 

37 DIMA(14,10) ,B(14,10) 
3B GET(3,5)-(17,15) ,A,G 

39 GET(33,5)-(47,15) ,B,G 

40 CLS3: PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLSc SCREEN 1 , 1 : 
PM0DE3 

41 PCLS0SNUM*44 

42 COLOR 1,1 

43 LINE (10,0)- (246, 185) ,PSET, 8 

44 LINE ( 10,0) -(BB, 62) ,PSET,BF 

45 LINE(l66,0)-(244,62) ,PSET,BF 

46 LINE(10,123)-<B8,1B5) ,PSET,BF 

47 LINE (166, 123)- (246, 1B5) ,PSET, 
BF 

4B F0RX=96T0146STEP25 

49 FORY=BTD4BSTEP20 

50 PUT(X,Y)-(X+14,Y+10) ,A,PSET 

51 NEXTYsNEXTX 

52 F0RX-21T0221STEP25 

53 FORY=68TO10BSTEP20 

54 IFX-121ANDY=BBTHEN56 



55 PUT(X,Y)-(X+14,Y+10> ,A,P5ET S3 

56 NEXTYlNEXTX 84 

57 F0RX=96T0146STEP25 85 
5B FDRY-128TO168STEP20 86 

59 PUT(X,Y)-<X+14,Y+10) T A,P5ET B7 

60 NEXTY:NEXTX BB 

61 C0LDR1,1 89 

62 M=*119sL-86 90 

63 GOSUB106 91 

64 'WAIT FDR COMMAND 92 

65 I*«INKEY*:IFI*-""THEN65 93 

66 IFI*-CHR*(94)THEN74 94 

67 IFI*=CHR*C10)THENB2 95 
6B IFI*»CHR#(B)THEN90 96 

69 IFI*-CHR*<9)THEN98 97 

70 IFI*= ,I J"THEN10B 98 

71 IFI*="N"THEN163 99 

72 IFI*- ,, Q"THEN175 100 

73 QOT064 101 

74 'MOVE UP 102 

75 IFL=66ANDM<94THEN7B 103 

76 IFL-66ANDMM44THEN7B 104 

77 IFL>6THEN79 105 

78 SOUND10,2:6OTD64 106 

79 C0L0R4, 4s GOSUB 106 107 

80 COLOR l,l:L=L-20: GOSUB 106 10B 
Bl G0T064 109 
82 'MOVE DOWN HO 



I FL» 1 06ANDM< 94THENB6 

1 FL=» 1 06ANDM > 1 44THENB6 

IFL<166THEN87 

SOUND10,2iGOTO64 

COLOR4 , 4 : G08UB 1 06 

COLOR1 , 1 : L-L+20: GOSUB106 

GOT064 

'MOVE LEFT 

I FM»94 ANDL< 66THEN94 

I FM=94ANDL > 1 06THEN94 

IFMM9THEN95 

SOUND 10,2s GOT064 

C0L0R4 , 4; GOSUBl 06 

COLOR 1 , 1 : M-M-25: GOSUBl 06 

G0T064 

MOVE RIGHT 
I FM= 1 44ANDL< 66THEN 1 02 

I FM= 1 44ANDL > 1 06THEN 1 02 

IFM<219THEN103 

SOUND 10,2: G0T064 

C0L0R4 , 4 : GOSUB 1 06 

COLOR 1 , 1 : M-M+25: GOSUB 106 

G0T064 

LINE(M,L>-<M+18,L+14> ,PSET,B 

RETURN 

'JUMP 

I FPPO I NT ( M+9 , L+7 )< >7THEN64 

I*=INKEY*i IFI*-""THEN110 




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J 



111 IFI*-CHR*C94)THENU6 

112 IFI*-CHR*U0)THEN127 

113 IFI*=CHR*(8)THEN13B 

114 IFI*=CHR*<9>THEN149 

115 SDUND10,2:GOTO110 

116 'JUMP UP 

117 IFL<46THEN160 

118 IFPP0INT(M+12,L-13>O7THEN16 


119 IFPP0INT(M+12,L-33X>BTHEN16 


120 COLOR4,4:GOSUB106 

121 PUTCM+2,L+2)-<M+16,L+12) ,B,P 
BET 

122 PUT<M+2,L-1B)-(M+16,L-B) ,B,P 
SET 

123 PUT<M+2,L-38)-<M+16,L-2B) ,A, 
PSET 

124 COLOR1,1:L=L-40:GOSUB106 

125 NUM=NUM-1 

126 G0T064 

127 'JUMP DOWN 
12B IFLM30THEN160 

129 IFPP0INT(M+12,L+27)O7THEN16 


130 IFPP0INT<M+12,L+47)O8THEN16 


131 COLOR4,4:GOSUB106 

132 PUT<M+2,L+2)-<M+16,L+12> ,B,F 
SET 

133 PUT<M+2,L+22>-<M+16,L+32) T B, 
PSET 

134 PUT(M+2,L+42)-(M+16,L+52> ,A, 
PSET 

135 COLOR l,lsL=L+40: GOSUB 106 

136 NUM-NUM-1 

137 G0T064 

13B 'JUMP LEFT 

139 IFM<69THEN160 

140 IFPPOINT<M-14,L+7)O7THEN160 

141 IFPPOINT<M-39,L+7><>STHEN160 

142 COLOR4,4:GOSUB106 

143 PUT(M+2,L+2)-<M+16,L+12) ,B,P 
SET 

144 PUT<M-23,L+2>-(M-9,L+12> ,B,P 
SET 

145 PUT<M-4S,L+2)-<M-34,L+12> ,A, 



See You At 

RAINBOWfest 
New Brunswick 

October 18-20 



PSET 

1 46 COLOR 1,1: M=M-50 : GOSUB 1 06 

147 NUM-NUM-1 
14B G0T064 

149 JUMP RIGHT 

150 IFM>169THEN160 

151 IFPPOINT(M+35,L+7)O7THEN160 

152 IFPPOINT(M+60,L+7)OBTHEN160 

153 COLOR4,4:GOSUB106 

154 PUT<M+2,L+2)-(M+16,L+12> ,B,P 
SET 

155 PUT<M+27,L+2)-(M+41,L+12> ,B, 
PSET 

156 PUT(M+52,L+2)-(M+66,L+12>,A, 
PSET 

1 57 COLOR 1,1: M=M+50 9 GOSUB 1 06 

158 NUM=NUM-1 

159 G0T064 

160 'REJECT MOVE 

161 SOUND10,2 

162 GOT064 

163 'NO MORE MOVES 

164 CLS:PRINTfl36,"YOU FINISHED W 
ITH"lNUM"PEGS" 

165 IFNUM>7THENR*="IT*S ONLY A G 
AME" 

1 66 I FNUM< BANDNUM >5THENR*« " KEEP 
TRYING" 

167 I FNUM< 6ANDNUM >3THENR*= " GOOD 
SCORE ! " 

168 IFNUM<4ANDNUM>1THENR*="VERY 
GOOD ! " 

169 I FNUM=1THENR*=" OLYMPIC HOPEF 
UL" 

170 IFNUM-1ANDPP0INT(12B,93>=7TH 
ENR#="YOUR PERFECT!" 

171 PRINTQ105,R* 

172 PR I NTQ294, "ANOTHER ROUND (Y/ 
N) " 

173 I*=INKEY*: IFI*«""THEN173 

174 IFI*-"Y"THEN40 

175 'QUIT 

176 CLS: SCREEN 0,1 

177 PLAY"T4; 03; L4E-; L3E;B;04; C; P 
4" 

17B CLS (4) 

179 PLAY"03;L4EjL3D;G:B:P4 M 

180 CLS (2) 

181 PL A Y " L5G ; L2G- j L5G » L3 A l L8 A- 1 L 
5A; 04; C; D3;L2B; L8B-; A; A-; L2G; P4" 

182 CLS<3) 

1B3 PLAY"L4E-;L3E;G;04;C;P4" 

1B4 CLS (5) 

IBS PLAY"D3;L4E;L3D;G;B;P4" 

186 CLS(B) 

1 87 PLAY " L5G ; L2B- ; L5G ; B ; L3 A ; L4G- 
; L2. G; 04; L8; T12; D|E| G-| L2G" 

IBB CLS(l) 



104 



THE RAINBOW June 1S8S 




HARDWARE PRO.I 



Play Your Favorite Games 
With No Wires Attached 



By JLO. Shaver 





For some time I had noticed that 
wireless joysticks were available 
for the Atari and Commodore 
computers, but, as usual, nothing for 
CoCo. It seemed it would be nice to 
have joysticks without wires so I could 
move back from the CoCo and TV to 
play a game and not have to sit shoulder 
to shoulder with the person 1 might be 
playing the game with. 

Since I had an Atari-to-CoCo joystick 
adapter, I thought just maybe the 
wireless receiver could be plugged into 
this adapter and I would have it made. 
Finally, the urge overtook me and I 
purchased the wireless joysticks. 

I rushed home and quickly set up the 
wireless joysticks, plugged them into the 
Atari adapter and the adapter into my 
CoCo. Turning the CoCo on, nothing 
happened. What a disappointment] 1 
couldn't even get the keyboard to 
respond. At first, I thought I had even 
damaged my CoCo + 

Being an electronic hobbyist and 
experimenter, and a hardware-type 
person for the last 30 years, this 
presented me with a real challenge, I 
decided to design and make an interface 
for the wireless joysticks for the CoCo, 

To start, I needed to know what the 
output section of the wireless receiver 
looked like and how it worked, By 



(Jim Shaver is an electrical engineer and 
works infield service for Westinghouse 
Electric Corp. His favorite hobby is 
experimenting with hardware projects 
for the CoCo.) 

June 1985 THE RAINBOW 105 



UNKNOWN !C 






555 



6 6 6 



Figure 1 



1 -TOP 

2 — BOTTOM 

3 - LEFT 

4 — RIGHT 
6 — FIRE 

8 — POWER SUPPLY COMMON 

OUTPUT PLUG 



OUTPUT STAGE OF 
WIRELESS RECEIVER 



opening up the unit and following out 
the circuit, 1 found the circuit as shown 
in Figure 1. 

By using an ohmmeter, 1 found a high 
resistance between pins with a diode 
and common, This value dropped to 
approximately 900 ohms when the 
joystick was operated for that particular 
direction. By seeing that change, I was 
also able to find which pin went with 
which direction. It came out as shown 
in Figure I. 

With this information, 1 proceeded 
with the interface. 



About the Circuit 

Refer to figures 2a and 2b. 1 will 
describe the left joystick side only since 
both left and right are identical, except 
for IC pin numbers in some cases. 

ICl is an Octal inverting Buffer with 
control gates for each of two groups 
of four buffers. See Figure 3 for its 
internal diagram. Resistors R1-R5 are 
pull-up resistors for the inputs. 

With the wireless joystick in the 
center position, the wireless receiver has 
a high resistance between its pins 1, 2, 
3, 4, 6 and ground pin 8. This allows 



a +5 volt (a logical one) on the inputs 
of IC 1 which gives a zero on the output, 
provided the control gates are enabled 
(more on this later). 

If the joystick is moved to the top 
position, pins I to 8 drop to approx- 
imately 900 ohms. This causes a voltage 
drop across resistor R5, which produces 
a logical zero on pin 2 of ICl which, 
in turn, products a logical one on pin 
18. In the same manner, other positions 
of the joystick will do the same. 

While experimenting with the wireless 
joystick, 1 found some conditions would 
cause random outputs of the wireless 
receiver. Left and right, top and 
bottom, or any combination could 
occur. This usually happened when the 
receiver was on without the joysticks 
being turned on, or when the joysticks 
were turned off without turning off the 
receiver. 

Since the CoCo cannot tolerate this 
condition, 1 added IC2 and used Id's 
control gate. 1C2 is a quad 2 input NOR 
gate. Each section looks at opposites 
(top-bottom or left-right) and if oppo- 
sites try to occur, it disables ICTs 
control gate which results in a zero 
output from ICL 

If, for example, wireless receiver pins 
I and 2 both go low (top and bottom 



74L524Q 




VCCI+5) 
14[ 1 3 1 12 [ 11 ] 



4066 






m 




Figure 3 



106 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



J1 




I 



3 I 




_5j 

6 I 1G2 




19 



13 



15 



11 



10 



IC1 



Back View Of 
Jack 



R1 



R2 



R3 



O ii— <> M it 



R4 



R5 



J2 |[| 

Tooooo 

\ 5 4 3 2 1 j 
V 9 8 7 6 / 

\oqocy 



i 



R6 



R7 



R8 



R9 



R10 



13 



IS 



11 



10 



18 



16 



20 



R11> R12:> R13> R14> R15! 



-0+5 




LT 
LB 
LL 

LR 

< LF 



LED3 K.ED4 LEO 5 



20 



IC3 



19 




18 



16 



RT 



■*- RB 

-*- RL 



♦ RR 



R16V R17S R18^ R19^ R20' 




LED 6 LED 7 



LED8 LED9 LED 10 



Figure 2a 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 107 




108 THE RAINBOW June 1965 



at the same time), pin 1 of IC2 goes 
high (logical one) putting a one on pin 
1 on IC1, which disables lCl's gate for 
these inputs. The left and right inputs 
are handled in the same manner. 

As an added frill, \ put LEDs on the 
output of IC1 and arranged them 
physically to represent the positions of 
the joystick with "fire" in the center. 
(These LEDs are really not necessary, 
but I like a lot of lights,) 

The position outputs of 1CI feed into 
IC4 which is a Quad Bilateral switch. 
This is where the logical ones and zeros 
will be converted to the analog voltages 
the CoCo needs. Refer to Figure 4. 

With zero inputs on IC4, both 
electronic switches are open; therefore, 
since R29 ~ R3I, they equally divide 
the +5 volts and this results in 2.5 volts 
to the CoCo joystick input, This is the 
center position. 

When SI receives a logical one, it 
closes, shorting out R29 which sends 
the +5 volts to the CoCo. This is the 
bottom or right position on the screen. 

When S2 receives a logical one, it 
closes, shorting out R3I, resulting in 
zero volts to the CoCo. This is the top 
or left position on the screen, 

IC2 prevents a logical one from 
reaching both SI and S2 at the same 
time. As you can see, this would result 
in a short between the +5 and ground. 
Resistors R21-R28 are there as pull- 
down resistors to hold IC4's gate at zero 
with no input. Since R29-R39 form 
voltage dividers, they should be matched 
as closely as possible or your center 
position may be off a little. 

For those of you who want centering, 
you could use a 10OK "pot" with its 
wiper tied to pins 2 and 4 f and its ends 
tied to +5 and ground, respectively, in 
place of R29 and R3l n and the other 
voltage divider resistors in the circuit. 

For the "fire" function, the CoCo 
wants a zero for a "fire" command and 
+5 volts for "no fire." Since I had to 
use another IC to invert the fire signal 
anyway, 1 thought that 1 would just as 
soon use the other two sections of the 
TC and add an "auto-fire" circuit. 

1C6 is a quad 2 input NAND. Each 
half is used as a gated oscillator. Logical 
signal LF coming from [CI is a logical 
one when you press the firebutton on 
the joystick, If SW2 is open, then this 
signal is inverted and sent to the CoCo. 
If SW2 is closed, the circuit oscillates 
and sends pulses to the CoCo n simulating 
pressing the firebutton rapidly. 

Power from the CoCo is not used 
in this interface. The wireless joysticks 
you buy assume you already have an 



Atari CX2600 game computer. The wall 
mounted transformer/ power supply 
plugs into the wireless receiver and the 
wireless receiver has a plug made to plug 
into the CX260G\ This is a nine-volt 
power supply (center positive). I took 
the nine-voit DC out of the wireless 
receiver, brought ii into the interface 
and regulated it down to +5 volts with 
a 7805 voltage regulator. Refer to 
Figure 5. 

Construction 

Layout and wiring are not critical. 
Wire wrapping or poini-to-point wiring 
and soldering is OK. I mounted the IC 
sockets on a perf board with solder pads 
and used point-to-point wiring. The 
circuit board was mounted in a small 
cabinet purchased at Radio Shack and 
the LEDs were mounted on the left and 
right sides and arranged lo represent 
the positions of the joystick. 

SWK the power switch, was placed 



on the front center and the left and right 
auto-fire switches, SW2 and SW3 on 
each side of the power switch. Input 
jacks to accept the wireless receiver 
output plugs were placed on the back 
of the cabinet. 

The part number specified for the 
Radio Shack joystick plugs includes a 
three-foot cable attached to the plug. 
The cable end was brought in through 
grommets in the rear panel. The power 
supply input jack was located in the 
rear. 

Testing and Checkout 

Before installing any of the ICs, 
double-check your wiring against the 
schematic. Make sure you brought the 
+5 and common to all the required 
points. Install IC1, IC2 and IC3 only 
at this time. 

Get out your wireless joystick and 
receiver and plug the output of the 
receiver into the interface. Plug the 



+5 

o 



SWITCH CONTROL 



O-SWfTCH OPEN 
1 -SWITCH CLOSED 



X 



>R29 



-O v 



■ 

SI 


%t 


V 


OP E.N 


OPEM 


2.5V 


CLOSED 


OPEN 


50V 


OPEN 


CLOSED 


o.ov 


CLOSED CLOSED 

NOT ALLOWED 



R31 



V 



Figure 4 



NO HEAT SINK REQUIRED 



+9V-D.C. IN 

FROM WIRELESS 

RECEIVER 




+5 V,D,C-TO INTERFACE 

CIRCUITS 

— o 



Figure § 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 109 



Atari CX2600 power supply into the 
receiver and the power plug coming out 
of the receiver into the interface. Do 
not plug the interface output plug into 
the CoCo at this time. Turn on the 
joysticks and plug in the CX2600 power 
supply. 

Now operate the joysticks and the 
LEDs that correspond to the joystick 
position should light up. Opposing 
LEDs (top-bottom or left-right) should 
not light up at the same time. Turning 
off either or both joysticks may cause 
random LED indication, but opposing 
lights should never come on. 

Now turn off the interface and install 
IC4, 5 and 6. Care should be taken when 
handling these integrated circuits since 
they are of the CMOS type. Plug the 
output plugs from the interface into the 
CoCo. Turn on the CoCo and type in 
the program listing in Figure 6. 

Now turn on the interface and run 
the program. When you operate the left 



BIGHT 
JOYSTICK 


LIFT 


CENTER 


RIGHT 






X RIGHT ■ 


a 


71 


&} 


H*OHT 
JOYSTICK 


itt* 1 


CENTE* 


fiQTTQim 


T RICJHT 


i 


J 1 


□3 



LEFT 

JOY STIC* 


HFT ClsKTEtt 


HTaHT 


KL£Ft: 





31 


do 


LEFT 

JOV&UCK 


TOP 


CtNT^P 


BOTTOM 


YL.EFT- 


□ 


Si 


p5J 



Figure 6 



and right joysticks, you should get the 
numbers for the various positions of the 
joystick as shown in the table in Figure 
6. Pushing the left or right firebutton 
will give an indication of "fire right" 
or "fire left," 
This completes the checkout of the 



interface. If everything went as outlined 
above, you are ready to load one of 
your favorite games and start playing. 
There are at least two wireless 
joysticks for the Atari and Commodore 
available. One is the RGA Model No. 
RGA-118, which sells for $34.95. There 
is also another type made by Cynex 
Manufacturing Corporation which is 
called the Game Male 2, 1 have the 
Game Mate 2 and it has a range of 
approximately 40 feet with reliable 
operation, Most of the popular games 
will work with these joysticks; however, 
some games that require a continuously 
variable analog input will not function 
properly. 



The listing: J5TKTE5T 
2 REM JDYSTK TEST 
5 CLSCi) 
10 XR=JOYSTK(0) 
20 YR=JOYSTK(l) 
30 XL=J0YSTK(2) 
40 YL=J0YSTK<3) 
50 PRINT @ 256, "X 
60 PRINT @ 320, "Y 
70 PRINT @ 384, "X 
60 PRINT « 44B,"Y 
90 F^PEEK (65280) 





100 


IF F=126 




110 


IF F=254 




120 


IF F-125 




130 


IF F=253 




131 


IF F=127 




132 


IF F=255 




134 


PRINT e 


RIGHT=";XR 


133 


GOTO 10 


RIGHT=";YR 


140 


PRINT e 


LEFT- "; XL 


150 


GOTO 10 


LEFT-";YL 


160 


PRINT e 




170 


GOTO 10 



THEN GOTO 140 

THEN GOTO 140 

THEN GOTO 160 

THEN GOTO 160 

THEN GOTO 134 

THEN GOTO 134 
192, "PUSH TO FIRE" 

192, "FIRE RIGHT" 

192, "FIRE LEFT" 



TRS-8D COLOR COMPUTER USERS NEWSPAPER 
SELL OR TRADE YOUR UNWANTED PROGRAMS OR HARDWARE IN THIS ITOTHLY NEWSPAPER. FIND GREAT BUYS. 
CIRCULATION - OVER 1B,000 COCO OWNERS. LIST YDUR CLUB OR BBS. FULL OF TIPS, ARTICLES, REVIEWS 
AND PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO. DON'T DELAY, SUBSCRIPTION STARTS AT ONLY $5.00 PER 12 ISSUES{1 YEAR) 
CLASSIFIED AD'S ONLY $.15 A WORD, USE SEPEHATE SHEET OF PAPER FOR CLASSIFIED AD'S 

YES - I WOULD LIKE A SUBSCRIPTION TO COCO ADS 
_ 1 YEAR THIHO CLASS NAIL $5.00 
" 1 YEAR FIRST CLASS & CANADA $10.00 



"\ 



\ 



l 



€0 CO ^MM& 



^j^-j i rj i r^ ^ ji ^ f ii y! ,»wwi 




NAME 



ADDRESS 



ZIP 



y t wffigj p m ^t 



CITY STATE 

PLEASE HAVE CHECKS PAYABLE TQ - P D SOFTWARE 
P BOX 13124 HOUSTON, TEXAS 77219 



110 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



From Computer Plus to YOU . . . 
PLUS after PLUS after PLUS 

A SPECTACULAR 
OFFER! 




A 

VERY 

AFFORDABLE 

DAISY WHEEL PRINTER 

SMITH-CORONA L-1000 



ONLY 



$259.00 



The Smith-Corona L-1000 text printer delivers 
fully formed executive quality daisy wheel print 
at a speed of 12 characters per second. It 
features bi-directional printing, triple pitch — 10, 
12, 15 cpi, logic seeking, underlining, 570 char- 
acter buffer, and has both a serial and parallel 
interface for easy connection to any computer. 
It takes single sheets of paper up to 13 inches 
wide, and an optional continuous forms feed 
can be added at any time. 



The Smith-Corona L-1000 is a simple, low 
cost and reliable text printer backed by the 
quality workmanship of Smith-Corona, The 
L-1000 is compatible with most word proces- 
sors, and even if you own a dot matrix printer 
this is a great opportunity to obtain professional 
looking results at an affordable price. 

Take advantage of this one time offer from 
Computer Plus while supplies last. 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-343-8124 

■ LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES 

* BEST POSSIBLE WARRANTY 

* KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF 

* TIMELY DELIVERY 

■ SHOPPING CONVENIENCE 



Cffl 



com 




P.O. Box 1094 
480 King Street 
Littleton, MA 01460 



SINCE 1973 



IN MASSACHUSETTS CALL (617) 486-3193 




VISA 



PLEASE I11CLUDE $2 J50 SHIPPIHG 



MOT]Qfll/MTOm 



go^BgoTre^, Q£]fflG syBER s^soft <5flG& 
QSvoflflESGe Gfeo 3 Qfcy ©©BEG 1 

n^ta fATT^ floSsyGQ as? oaSflocil ^ yrfiiri 
SeeQq 

S5\zSia at? snaoOflsfl eksg'qqq GXsCsGflstB 

Am ®gq&0 saora^ ^wsaa <^ao& ®b 



O n O 









■ ■■ mi ■■■ ma !■■« 



EESTSlBMrO©!^ 



125 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 
LEWISTON, N.Y. 14092 



IM®)Mim^gJi»E»M 



ctt SS gflaD G&oG ©trim &jq 

a£? STfefiflra srafi Q&ST3Q SjOj^jSgetic] aff 

OB ^JEra ^^Gfe ^_ 

a^?a apssioa ^ aa£l &s<vR3 G&<3e^ 
QEf^fflSCTjtiiGaatiiO e£J QSEiil^ 3Cto£Mjti} 



1 oinreioKMlViTi-rrimo oara 






-iimjL, 

it* - ° 




420 FERGUSON AVE. N. 
HAMILT0N,0NT.,L8L 4Y9 




Super-Disk Charger 
Puts The 'Turbo' 
In Your Drives 



Two years ago disk drives were 
outrageously expensive. Conse- 
quently, most CoCo owners were 
using cassette recorders. I, too, wasn't 
in a position to shell out the more than 
$600 for two single-sided drives and an 
interface. Radio Shack's drives couldn't 
even get past track 35, 

The story is different today. I have 
seen new double-sided, double-density 
40-track disk drives for under $ 100 3 less 
the controller which is around £80, from 
the Radio Shack warehouse as a 
replacement part, There are at least 
other interfaces from other companies 
available. 

Hence the problem: Only a single side 
will be accessed if double-sided drives 
are used. Also, track-to-track access 
time, with the Disk BASIC, will be an 
incredibly slow 30 milliseconds. 

Here is a solution to the problem! 
This program will allow you to buy any 
type of plug compatible 40-track disk 
drive and tailor the Disk BASIC to your 
needs. All that is required is for your 
computer to have 64 K of RAM, or for 
you to burn your own EPROM and 
use it in the disk controller 

(Dennis Bironas holds a bachelors 
degree in electrical engineering technol- 
ogy and has taught in the E.E.T. 
Department at Indiana University at 
Kokomo. He works for Deico Electron- 
ics in advanced development as a 
projeci engineer, Dennis and his wife 
own Micro-Connection and sell peri- 
pherals for the CoCoJ 



By Dennis Bironas 




The modification requires you to run 
the basic program called CHARGER. 
You will then be prompted for answers. 
You will be able to change the Baud 



rate and to use either single- or double- 
sided disk drives at a six or 12 millisec- 
ond step rate- 
Not included in the options of my 

June 1965 THE RAINBOW 113 







(let 00 



Where but at RAINBOWfest could 
you meet so many CoCo enthu- 
siasts, see so many new products, 
and attend seminars that are of immediate 
assistance? It's the next best thing to 
receiving the latest issue of the rainbow 
in your mailbox. 

Many of the people who write for THE 
rainbow — and those who are written 
about — are there to meet you and answer 
your questions, technical and otherwise. 
RAINBOWfest is CoCo's very own show, 
and it's a people-to-people event as well 
as a valuable learning experience. 

To make it easier for you to attend, we 
schedule RAINBOWfest in three parts of 
the country. If you missed the fun in Irvine, 



Calif., and Chicago, why don't you make 
plans now to be with us in New Brunswick, 
NJ.? Each show is unique, offering fun, 
new acquaintances, and great sharing 
experiences. For members of the family 
who don't share your affinity for CoCo, 
you'll be comfortable knowing that each 
RAINBOWfest is located in an area that will 
provide fun and enjoyment for all. 

The Hyatt Regency offers special rates 
($62, single or double room) for RAIN- 
BOWfest The show opens Friday evening 
with a 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. session. It's a 
daytime-only show Saturday — the CoCo 
Community Breakfast is at 8 a.m., then the 
exhibit hall opens promptly at 10 a.m. and 
runs continuously until 6 p.m. There will 



be no exhibition hours or seminars Saturday 
evening. On Sunday, the exhibit hall opens 
at 1 1 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. 

A well-known speaker will again keynote 
the highly popular CoCo Community 
Breakfast. And you can set your own pace 
in the exhibit hall intersperced with a 
number of seminar sessions on all aspects 
of CoCo — from improving your BASIC 
skills to working with the OS-9 system. 

But most of all, there will be exhibitors. 
Lots of them. All ready to demonstrate 



products of every kind. It's a time for 
unveiling brand new products. Many have 
special buys for RAINBOWfest. If you've 
been eyeing something in the rainbow, 
you can try it out and take it home that 
very day. 

Tickets may be obtained directly from 
THE rainbow. We'll also send you a special 
reservation form so you can get your 
special room rate. 

Come to RAINBOWfest. Let's all celebrate 
the CoCo Community! 






RAINBOWfest - New Brunswick, N J. 

Dates: October 18-20, 1985 

Hotel: Hyatt Regency 

Rooms: $62,per night, single or double 

Advance Ticket Deadline: October 11, 1985 



Show Schedule: 

Friday evening — Exhibit hall open from 7 p.m. 

to 10 p,m, 
Saturday — CoCo Community Breakfast at 8 a.m. 

Exhibit Hall opens at 10 a.m. and closes at 6 p.m. 
Sunday — Exhibit Hall open from 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



FREE Rainbow poster 

for first 500 ticket orders received. 

FREE T-Shirt to first five ticket 
orders received from each state. 



Make checks payable to: 
THE RAINBOW 



MAIL TO; 

RAINBOWfest 
P.O. BOX 365 
Prospect, KY 40059 
(502) 228-4492 



YES, Vm coming to RAtNBOWtestl I want to save by buying tickets now at the special 
advance sale price, 
Please send me; 



. Three day tickets at $9 each 
_ One day tickets at &7 each 

Circle one: Friday / Saturday / Sunday 
-Saturday breakfast tickets at $12 each 

Handling Charge $1 



TOTAL ENCLOSED (U.S. FUNDS ONLY, PLEASE) 
I — I Also send me a hotel reservation card. 

NAME (please print) 

STREET & NUMBER 

CITY & STATE 

TELEPHONE 

COMPANY . 



total . 
total . 

total . 



1 .00 



.ZIP CODE. 



Orders received less than two weeks prior to show opening will be held for you at the 

door. 

VISA, MasterCard, American Express accepted. 

My Account # Ex. Date: 



If MasterCard, include interbank number 
Signature 



program is the ability to use Disk basic 
for 40 tracks. If you want 40 tracks 
instead of 35, add these lines: 



The listings are included so you may 
type them in and add^ delete, and 
generally modify them to suit your 



POKE&HD1B0 ,40 : P0KE&HD572 , 40 : P0KES.HD535 , 40 
P0KE&HD35F , ?B ; POKEC700 • 76 : PDKE&HC7BB , 7B 
PDKE&HC7R.0 , 7B : PBKE&HC7BF , 7B : P0KE&HCC4C , 78 
P0KE&HCQD9 , 7B : PDKE&HD44G , 39 : POKE&HC72P , 1 



Listing 1: CHARGER 


10 DEFUSRl*8tHE00 


20 CLS 


30 PR I NT "DO YQU WISH TO CHANBE P 


R INTER 


40 ] 


INPUT "BAUD RATE <Y,N)"|Q* 


50 ] 


IF Q*-"Y M THEN B0 


60 ] 


IF Q*-"N" THEN 250 


70 GOTO 20 


B0 CLS 


90 FRINT"PICK YOUR PRINTER BAUD" 


100 


PRINT" 1) 300" 


110 


PRINT"2> 600" 


120 


PRINT"3) 1200" 


130 


PRINT"4) 2400" 


140 


PRINT "5) 4B00" 


150 


INPUT"6) 9600" * B 


160 


IF B-0 THEN 80 


170 


IF B«l THEN POKE150,1B0 


180 


IF B-2 THEN POKE 150 ,87 


190 


IF B-3 THEN POKE 150,41 


200 


IF B=4 THEN POKE 150, 18 


210 


IF B-5 THEN POKE 150, 7 


220 


IF B-6 THEN POKE150,1 


230 


IF B>6 THEN 80 


240 


DEF USR1-&HE00 


250 


CLS 


260 


PRINT" INPUT YOUR CHOICE" 


270 


PRINT" 1) DS 6MS DRIVES 


2S0 


PRINT"2) DS 12 MS DRIVES 


290 


PRINT"3) 88 6MB DRIVES 


300 


INPUT"4> SS 12 MS DRIVES" » K 


310 


IF K-0 THEN 250 


320 


IF K>4 THEN 250 


330 


ON K GOTO 340,350,360,370 


340 


LO ADM " B00T6 " : GOTO380 


350 


LOADM"BODT"!SOTO 380 


360 


LOADM"SSDC6" t GOTO380 


370 


LOADM"SSDC" l 8OTO3B0 


380 


X-USR1 (0) 



Listing 2 


SDC 










OEOO 




ooioo 


ORG 


$0E00 




OEOO CC 


OEOO 


00110 


LDD 


#3E00 




0E03 DD 


72 


00140 


STD 


$72 




0E05 7F 


DFFF 


00130 START 


CLR 


$DFFF 


TEST IF IN ALL RAM MODE 


0E08 8$ 


AA 


00160 


LDA 


*$AA 




GEOA B7 


DFFF 


00170 


STA 


$DFFF 




QEOD Bl 


DFFF 


00 ISO 


CHFA 


$DFFF 




0E10 27 


17 


00190 


BEQ 


RAJI0DE 


ALREADY IN RAI1 MODE 



needs. You will have to input the 
machine language programs either with 
pokes or by assembling them and saving 
them on disk as follows: 



ogram Name 


Used As 


BOOT6 


DS 6 ms 


BOOT 


DS 12 ms 


SSDC6 


SS6ms 


SSDC 


SS 12 ms 



The data starting at locations E3A 
and E50 should be changed to $0115 
if a 12 ms step is required. 

The data staring at locations E42 and 
E59 should be changed to $121212 if 
single-sided drives are used. 

This program at least allows you to 
buy the kind of disk drive you want, 
or as your economics dictate. Today 
you can buy a double-sided drive as 
inexpensively as you can a single-sided, 
1 am sure you will learn that with the 
CoCo, you are not bound to Tandy's 
disk drives. CoCo users are indeed a 
fortunate breed! 

Super- Disk Charger automatically 
checks to see which version of DOS you 
have. This means new users and old- 
timers alike will be able to use the 
CHA RGER with no modifications to 
your machines. (1 understand that 
Version 1.2 DOS will be available 
soon.) 

Type in (with the CHARGER in 
DriveO) RUN "CHARGER". The program 
is menu driven. You may select your 
Baud rate and disk step rate from the 
menu. DS means double-sided; SS 
means single-sided. Therefore, you may 
select double-sided or single-sided disk 
drives for a six or 12 ms step rate- 
Normal power-up step rate is 30 ms. 
Wow! That's an increase of 2,5 to 6 
times faster. 

In a bad case calculation with the 
head resting on Track 35, the head 
would have to move to Track 17 to find 
where the program resides on the disk, 
then go there. If it had to go back to 
Track 35, it would take 1.08 seconds 
for the head to get where it had to go 
and to pull off the program. 

This doesn't sound like a lot of time, 
does it? When you're in a hurry, one 
second can seem like a century. Another 
example is the track-to-track time, If 
you initialize a new disk or try to make 
a backup, you might wait an extra three 
or four seconds. 

One side of the diskette in Drive 
becomes Drive 0, while the other side 
of the same diskette becomes Drive 2, 
One side of the diskette in Drive I 
becomes Drive 1, while the other side 



116 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



0E12 U 


50 


00200 


ORCC 


#$50 


DISABLE FIRQ4-IR 


0E14 6E 


SOOO 


00210 


LDX 


#$8000 


POINT TO EXTENDED BASIC 


0E17 EC 


84 


00220 LOOP 


LDD 


pX 


GET ROM DATA 


0E19 7F 


FFDF 


00230 


CLR 


3FF0F 


SET TO MAP TYPE 1 


0E1C ED 


81 


00240 


STD 


,X++ 


SAVE ROM DATA TO RAH MIRROR 


0E1E 7F 


FKDE 


007.50 


CLR 


$FFDE 


SELECT ROM MAP TYPE 


0E21 8C 


DEFF 


00260 


CMPX 


#$DEFF 


END OF ROM ? 


0E24 25 


Fl 


00270 


BCS 


LOOP 




0E26 If 


FFDF 


00280 


CLR 


$FFDF 


YES.. CHANGE TO ALL RAM MODE 


0E29 CC 


2B2B 


00290 RAMODE 


LDU 


tf$2B2B 


NEW PROMPT SYMBOL 


OE2C PD 


AREE 


00300 


STD 


$ABEE 


MODIFY BASIC 'OK' 


0E2F 86 


30 


00310 


LDA 


#$30 




0E31 fli 


CH2 


00320 


CMFA 


$C142 


DOS VERSION L.O 


0E34 27 


17 


00330 


BEQ 


DOS 




0E36 8D 


4C 


00340 


BSR 


CLEAR 


CLEAR SCREEN 


DE3S CC 


0014 


00350 


LDD 


#$0014 


6 MS* RESTORE AND HOME 


0E3B B7 


D7C0 


0O36O 


STA 


$D7C0 


$0015 FOR 12 MS, 


0£3E F7 


D816 


00370 


STB 


$D$16 




0E41 CC 


4142 


00380 


LDD 


#$4142 


FOR DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES 


0E44 FD 


D89F 


00390 


STD 


$D89F 




0E47 10SE C139 


00400 


LDY 


#$C139 




UE4B 20 


11 


00410 


BRA 


(!0D 




GMD SD 


35 


00420 DOS 


BSR 


CLEAR 


CLEAR SCREEN 


OEAF CC 


0014 


00430 


LDD 


#$0014 


6 MS. RESTORE 


0E52 B7 


rjfiCD 


00440 


STA 


$D6CD 




0ES5 F7 


D723 


004 50 


STB 


$D723 


FOR DOS VERSION 1.0 


0E58 CC 


4142 


00460 


LDD 


#$4142 


DOUBLE SIDED DRIVES 


0E5b FD 


D7AC 


00470 


STD 


$D7AC 




0E5E 30 


8D 0033 


00480 MOD 


LEAX 


TABLE, FCR GET MESSAGE BEG* ADDR* 


0E62 86 


OD 


00490 


LDA 


#$0D 


CARRIGE RETURN CODE 


0E64 3D 


21 


00500 HODA 


BSR 


OUTCH 


OHTPUT CR 


0E66 A6 


80 


00510 MODI 


LDA 


T X+ 


OUTPUT MESSAGE 


0E68 81 


04 


00520 


CMPA 


U 


END OF MESSAGE 7 


0E6A 27 


02 


00530 


BEQ 


END 


YES 


0E6C 20 


F6 


00540 


BRA 


MODA 


m 


0E6E OF 


E3 


00550 END 


CLR 


$E3 


SETUP FOR AUTO RESTART 


QE70 OF 


E4 


00560 


CLR 


$E4 


AFTER RESET IS PUSHED 


0E72 B6 


FF03 


00570 


LDA 


$FF03 




0E75 8A 


01 


00580 


ORA 


#1 




0E77 B7 


FP03 


00590 


STA 


$FF03 




0E7A OF 


6F 


00600 


CLR 


$6F 


IRQ DISABLE 


0E7C m 


AD33 


00610 


JSR 


$AD33 


RESET STACK 


0E7F 1C 


AF 


00620 


ANDCC 


#$AF 




0E81 7E 


AC73 


00630 


JMP 


$AC73 


RESTART BASIC 


QE84 8E 


0400 


00640 CLEAR 


LDX 


#$400 


BEGINNING OF DISPLAY 


0E87 86 


60 


00650 


LDA 


#$60 


SPACE CODE 


0EB9 A7 


80 


00660 CLEAR1 


STA 


»X+ 


PUT SPACES IN THE DISPLAY 


0E8B 8C 


Q60G 


00670 


CMFX 


#$600 


END OF DISPLAY 7 


0E8E 26 


F9 


00680 


BNE 


CLEAR1 


NO 


0E90 39 




00690 


RTS 


RETURN 




0E91 6E 


9F A002 


00700 OUTCH 


JMP 


C$A002] 


BASIC OUTPUT 


0E95 


4D 


00710 TABLE 


FCC 


"MICRO- 


:ONNECTION " 


0EA6 


20 


00720 


FCC 


" 1985 


» 


OEAD 


CD 


00730 


FCB 


$0D 




OEAE 


42 


00740 


FCC 


"BY D.K.3IK0NA3 " 


OEBD 


OD 


00750 


FCB 


$0D 




OEBE 


52 


00760 


FCC 


"RR# 2 


* 


0EC4 


OD 


00770 


FCB 


$0D 




0EC5 


46 


00780 


FCC 


* FRANKFORT, INDIANA" 


0ED7 


20 


00790 


FCC 


" 46041 


#t 


OEDE 


OD 


00800 


FCB 


$0D 




OEDF 


OD 


00810 


FCB 


$0D 




QEEO 


53 


00820 


FCC 


"SUPER -DISK" 


OEEA 


Of) 


00830 


FCB 


$0D 




OEEB 


43 


00840 


FCC 


"CHARGER 1,3" 


0EF6 


OIJ 


00850 


FCB 


$0D 




0EF7 


04 


00860 


FCB 


4 






0000 


00870 


END 






00000 TOTAL ERRORS 











of the same diskette becomes Drive 3, 
Try this: Put a diskette with programs 
on il in Drive and type in DSKTNI2. 
After the formatting is complete, type 
in BACKUP TO 2. Now, do a DIR0 
THEN DIR2. Got the idea? The bottom 
line is that the other side of the diskette 
becomes another drive number, 

One last thought to consider: You 
should realize a marked decrease in disk 
drive mechanically generated noise; 
most of the noise is generated from the 
head drive mechanism. You should use 
your disk drive at or near its speed 
capability — they will last longer. 

By the way, you can permanently 
change your step rate by comparing the 
old DOS with the CHARGED DOS 
and making the changes in EPROM. 
That is perfectly legal for you to do, 
but not for me to do for you. 

My system has none of the original 
ROMs, as I have changed each ROM 
so my system is automatically configured 
on "power up." It really gets to be a 
pain when you have to do several PEEKs 
and POKEs every time you power down. 

Let me know how useful this program 
is to you. Drop me a line and let me 
know what else you are interested in, 
I will only consider serious software 
suggestions. 

I also have a double-sided, plated 
through holes, gold plated edge con- 
nector EPROM programmer circuit 
board with software for $30 plus 
postage, It will cost you about another 
$30 for the parts to build it. For 
information on the programmer, send 
$2 to: 

Dennis Bironas 

R.R.#2 

Frankfort, IN 46041 

The programmers can be built (cutting 
runners) to program 2764s. With no 
modifications, it will program 2716s, 
2732s, 2532s and 2564s. The pro- 
grammer will work with all models of 
CoCos when nine volt batteries are used 
as the programming supply. 



rfRh 



See You At 

RAINBOWfest New Brunswick 

October 18-20 



June 1985 THERAINBOW 117 




DRACONIAN 

You brace yourself as your ship 
materializes in the enemy sector. 
Your engine roars to life, and you 
consult the long-range scanner for 
the position of the nearest enemy 
base. As you head for the base, 
blasting asteroids and space-mines 
in your path, you suddenly notice a 
monstrous space-dragon looming 
before you. Reacting quickly, you 
dodge hte deadiy fire-breath and 
blast him out of existence 

This is it — the single most 
impressive, awe-inspiring arcade 
game you can buy for your 
Color Computer. High-resolution 
graphics, awesome sound effects, 
four-voice music, and quality you 
have \o see to believe! Experience 
the realism of DRACONIAN today! 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 

32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 

TAPE $27.95 DISK $30.95 







SR-71 

SR-71 is a. fa si action game in which 
tfOU are thfl pilot on a mission to take 
photographs ot mi&sile sites in Russia 
and deliver ihem to our processing 
laboratory m Japan So real ynu will teal 
as ft you are rn the cockpit on a real spy 
mission. Elude Russian missiles as well 
as their detectmn devices. Another Tom 
Mi* exclusive A must for Die advan 
lurous. Fanl&siic graphics, color and 

sound 32K Ext Basic 

TAPE $28,95 DISK $31. 95 



PAK-PANIC 

Pah man is steered thru a maze eating dots 
and powwprll*. Pakman is pursued by tour 
monaters who try lo calch and kill him. If 
Pakman &ats a powerpill he becomes power- 
ful and can eat monsters, Monsters try lo 
avoid a powerful Pakman. As monsters are 
ealen their ghosts appear on the Lop of (he 
screen When seven ghosts have appeared 
one will llv across Die screen or they will link 
together forming a cenllpede that wiN travel 
thru iha maze. Pakman has no power againsl 
ghosts and centipedes and must avoid them 
or be killed JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE 324,35 DISK S27J5 




BOTH MS. MAZE & PAK PANIC ONLY 4190 TAPE, 50.90 DISK 




MS. MAZE 

MS. MAZE is remarkable in thai it combines 
brilliant color, high resolution, detailed 
graphics, and music with a vary playabto 
game. Anything that could be dene to make 
the Color Computer look and play like the ar- 
caoe version has been done MS, MAZE Is 
without question the closest thing lo ihe ar- 
cade Pac games that I have seen for the Coco. 
JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 
32K MACHINE LANGUAGE 
TAPE $24 95 DISK 527,95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

42B5 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS. Ml 49506 




WORLDS OF FLIGHT (WQF) i S a 
"view" oriented flight simulation for 
the TRS-BO Color Computer, writ* 
ten entirety in Machine Language. 
"View" 1 oriented means thai the 
pilot may determine hie or her posi 
tion by actually viewing thosurroun 
ding tend marks as opposed to us- 
ing instruments which sense 
navigational references, This is a 
major departure from "instrument 
only" simulations which can be 
achieved I h rough BASIC programs. 
Most instrument maneuvers and 
procedures may be practiced. The 
craft is a light-weight, single-engine 
airplane with low wings A nose 
wheel which is both steerabie and 
retractable is also modeled. Some 
aerobatics are possible including 
sustained inverted flight, aileron 
rolls, spins and stalls. 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED 

32 K MACHINE LANGUAGE 

TAPE $29,95 DISK $32.95 



*** The First *— 



Th© First 
64K Arcade Game 
For the Color Computer 

The hid icfeeft obetiiva is to coK-h ©nagoh fit Flue's fcrfses 
■j1hO»e ftea Hearl Shapea rhi-£ K | 'o mi i" Unv wn«' :r 
he SoilOFman'ii JTOuW If yOu DOPv Ijme vai,si p'-ir.ch t jsl sn 



The 
SftlLOft 

MRN 

I Screens -Plu^' IN VISO SCR€€rT 



Vtnj gan ierid PhepunChmg bd£tw*f Id nrrocir Ir.* LuC^r 
DOwfi ona WW\ a nine c-1 cti'jcn ngh' orln B^gtotbadguv'* 
head, rhiv will give vsu o ii«ie tbu- ^ mu^j fcme to DOToft 



nil ihoEs RhsIi. 

tou cnusf a void tonlaci wtb 6igforbodpuv wno u oc*iysi* 

pu'i'jing vO»j Vftu *fly*r ciKa Pjr rorsrii nt Oldugl^po- 
womvri who .will appear ai higher ditf'Liuily lew>U Itf tn-jcd. 
B^npliGi Ot vOu Olher ovoud fh& Myincf Porfoef c* punch 
liwn ( wth rrra lira tuition i *j Keup t'Qf ■ ■ be ' ly k rHjckea Intel 
the wa"ffi 

rtie j&ewa wrwrv nnjacwwu rv7 coiiecr. enoujjn p%gie* 10 
o\av Elsie a little lave song You mawjumpcfl and ante l^e 
(tfher e">S S? Folduv*.W | '' l *30 h < IH *&' J '9* f 4 h?w1er*nMsr In ll^ 
up cv deck and even two decks :f yOu TnAAa^a la C£HCTi 
iiGid or 5^noJlQl*tlt1(id 'i yqp rqTidlea Ti"ie i^ Mgfir uht| 

away vou go 

The 'h.^ screen a D|tfCllvH >i WJ COH(*cr #froug*iT HHHwl 
linrown (^ fines cries Tar m-£ l-Pi fo compile a laaasr ai 
Ine wav 10 'ho (irow'11 iS-sl who's (: LsiffL if M»iHfigv*>J B**are 
flt »ie Cfow hDiwe^^r *hD rhmirt *n Orft QfWe fiftl erJQi' 

Ofv afl Bcreena, eating a can OH Cdllatd £pre«ni liQbelBd 
:■ lor Co'orfl sftQ ^osn^i 1 few r- jn ~ r - ir - s i r ' fl Ci:!,ri ; ^ Tf g h| i 

w-ll give vCili amazing speed, sl'u<nali- d^d dgHlHV and 

olio*- yc?j ti Sffta aifftarbodfluv mq ttw 4('"i* wtifi =♦ ^.gie 

R€QUIR€S 6aK 
DISK $W.*5 TRP€ $19,95 







ADD S2.50 POSTAGE & HANDLING * {CANADA ADD S3. 00) 

• MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX • 

LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 

TOP ROAALTIES PAID 

(616)957-0444 | 



WRITE FOR FREE CATALOGUE - MOST OF OUR INVENTORY IS NOT SHOWN HERE! 



■QUALITY EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE' 
VOCABULARY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 



16K Extended basic/32K for printer output 

The Vocabulary Management System (VMS) is a series of programs designed to aid a parent or teacher in helping children to learn and practice 
using vocabulary and spelling words. The 11 programs that comprise the VMS include a full feature data entry/edit program, three printer output 
programs and 5 vocabulary/spelling game programs, The system's many outstanding features include: 

to —The p ri nter segments a If o w f u II use of your 
printer's special features, 
—The 5 game programs are based on 
to sound educational principles and provide 

practice in identifying words and matching 
them with their definitions in a fast-paced 
set of activities. 



—As many as 300 vocabulary words and 

definitions may be in the computer's 

memory at one time. 
—Words and definitions may be saved 

on disk or tape. 
—Remarks and/or comments can be saved 

with word tiles. 



—A disk loading menu allows students 
load disk files without typing file names. 

—Word lists may be quickly alphabetized. 

—The three printer segments allow you 
create and print individualized tests. 
puzzles, word-searches and worksheets, 

TAPE S39.95 DISK £42.95 



FRACTIONS - A Three Program Package - 32 K EXT, BASIC TAPE $30.95 DISK $35,95 



MIXED & IMPROPER 

Ri?vifl* •:.L^n v j?rlirii T | rvj.xen niJUlftralS Bt\ti mpnopeT Itatllijns 

Pr»c(w(i snnuHJltng mi*i?rt r*(jrnflr?il* in Impnopgr frjirMnnij 
FfjiciiLp ■ujrwenirifl tmptatxt |tw$WH lo nttRfld numerma 
Police of both type*. {Mwfld to improper & improper 1<5 n»|jtsdj 
Rotfiaw ewitranmg mntM numerals fa maaa nurpofais. 

I Used In =e grouping In subnlrachonl 

Pradice conwfling mixed numerals la mi*ed numerals 



EQUIVALENCE 

T. DellnrflOfift Ql ilti^e and f$vifiw 0' P.rtfJ.ng Equ-valrn! Fractions 

2. Pruc(ice finding equiyafrnl fractions 

3 Pr«evcr 'ind-^c -=f\T- <51 equivalpnl factum* 

A Review eT linding if one* fraction is eoiiHl to. rial tmuhl to. less than 

(n greater liian anolter 
5 Praclicfl Finding iF one fraction tn pqusl ta, not enjyfll to. lugs than 

or greater Itifli anuUier 



LOWEST TERMS 

Review oi plaGiop hoci.ofp, mlo io*oai terms by ^ndirHj the 
greatest com moo (actor fGCFi on he numarator and danorrurtiiof 
P/acHee finding ih& GC-F oi paka of numbers 
Praclttfl placing ftachona m1n IhwhicI lerm« hy JlnrJhnn; I to GCF nl 
ihe numerarar and] denominflrjor 



TEACHER'S DATABASE 

TEACHER'S DATABASE is a program designed to allow a teacher to 
keep a computerized fHe of information about his/her students. There 
are many features that make this proo/am particularly attractive: 

■ Information on as many as 100 students (or more) may be In the com- 
puter at one time. 

* Each student may have as many as 20 r,or mora) individual items of 
date in his/her record 

* The program will run from cassette or disk. 

■ Cassette and disk files are completely compatible, 
e The program la menu driven. 

» Records may be easily changed, deleted, combined or added. 

* Information about students may be numerical or text. 

* Records may be quickly alphabetized. 

■ Records may be sorted by various criteria. 

* Records may be reordered (ranked} based on test scores or other 
data. 

■ Data displayed during a sort may be printed on a printer or saved on 
disk or cassette as a new file, 

* A full statistical analysis of data may be done and sent to the printer 

* Student test scores may be weighted. 

REQURES 32K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $39.05 DISK S42.S5 



MATH DUEL 

MATH DUEL is a challenging mathematics game thar pits you against the 
computer if a game of wits. You must us© all of your Knowledge of factors, 
multiples and prime numbers to develop a strategy that allows you to gather 
more numbers and thus more points that than the computer. 

The game is deceptively simple. You select the stee of Ihe playing field 
that is composed of from 8 to 100 numbers. You must then choose numbers 
that will give you the maximum number of points and the computer the least 
number of paints. There are onlv 6 rules 

i Any number that you chose must have at least one factor stiff on the 
playing field. 

2. You receive points equal to the face value of the number that you chose, 

3. The computer receives points equal to the face value of all of the remaining 
factors of the number that you chose. 

4. Ail of the numbers that were awarded to you or to the computer are 
removed from the fieid. 

5 The game continues until there are no numbers with factors remaining. 

6, At the end the computer receives points equal lo the value of all of the 

remaining numbers 
32K EXT, BASIC TAPE $24.95 DISK S29.95 



ESTIMATE 

ESTIMATE is a program designed to help children 
to practice estimating the answers to addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication and division problems on the 

Color Computer, it has many features (hat make 
Its use particularly altraclive 

• Up to 5 students may use the program ai the 
same time. 

■ There are 5, user modifiable, skill levels 

• The acceptable percent error may be 
changed as a student's skill improves. 

• A Timer measures the number of seconos 
used to answer eaen problem and the torsi 
Hme used tor a series of problems 

9 If a problem has been answered incorrectly, 
me student is told tne percent error and 
asked to try again. 

• If a problem is answered incorrectly a second 
time, the student is told the correci answer and 
the range of acceptable answers is displayed. 

• A repo'rt is given at the end of each set of 
problems that includes the number of 
problems done, the number of problems 
answered correctly on the first try and the 
average percent error 

• The (BREAK) key has been disabled so that 
child will not inadvertently stop the program 
from running. REQUIRES T6K EXT. BASIC 

TAPE S19.95 DISK S22.95 



PRE-ALGEBRA I INTEGERS 

INTEGERS is a series of four programs designed 
to give students practice in working with addition, 
subtraction, multiplication, division and the 
comparison of integers, it has many features that 
make a very valuable tool for introducing andVor 
maintaining skills 

• Up to 4 students may use the program at the 
same time, 

■ There are 9. user modifiable, skill levels. 

• Students are given two opportunities to answer 
a problem. 

■ A detailed report of student performance, 
including number correct on first try, number 
wrong, total time used and percentage score, 
is presented at the end of a series of problems 

■ The programs will run on a t6K THS-S0 Color 
Computer with or without disk drive 

Four distinct problem formats are presented. The 
first presenis problems in this format; - 12 + -9 
= ? The second program presents a problem with 
missing numerals in this format: -7 -? = 18. The 
third program presents a problem whh a missing 
sign: 8 - ?6 = 14 The last program asks The 
student to determine the relationship ( = , -* or **| 
between two statements 3-9 (??) - 4 - 5, 
32K EXT. BASIC 
TAPE $28.95 DISK 533.95 



PRE-ALGEBRA II 

The second PRE-ALGEBRA PACK is composed 
of two programs, EQUATION SOLVER AND 
EQUATION DUEL, that are designed lo give 
students practice in using and solving equations. 
It has many features that make a very valuable tool 
for introducing and I or maintaining skills: 

■ In both programs students may Choose the 
range of numerical values that will be included 
in the equations SO thai the difficulty may 
change as their skill increases. 

- in EQUATION SOLVER the computer 
secrately generates a random equation, shows 
the numbers thai it used in the equation and 
the answer and challenges the student to 
create higher own equation that uses the 
same numbers and results in the same 
answer, 

■ In EQUATION DUEL the student and the 
computer race to see who will be ihe first 
to create an equation from the same set of 
random numbers. 

• Both programs give detailed repels o' the 
students and the computer's performance in 
creeling and solving equations including time 
used, score and percentage correct, 
32K EXT BASIC 
TAPE S2fl .95 DISK $33.95 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

42B5 BRADFORD N.E. 
GRAND RAPIDS, Ml 49506 



ADD $2.50 POSTAGE & HANDLING • (CANADA ADD S3. 00) 

• MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX • 
LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 



TOP ROAALTIES PAID 

(616) 957-0444 



WRITE FOR FREE CATALOGUE • MOST OF OUR INVENTORY IS NOT SHOWN HERE! 



COMPUTER EXECS? — The technol- 
ogy of artificial intelligence has taken 
computers "beyond sophisticated 
number crunching to participation in 
management decisions/ 1 according to a 
spokesman for Litton, a California- 
based company that develops electronics 
and defense systems. 

Appearing before the Houston So- 
ciety of Financial Analysts, Sy Schoen, 
the manager of Litton's artificial 
intelligence program, said that he 
foresees applications in marketing, 
planning, production management, 
customer service, and in further auto- 
mating a company's facilities. 

Currently under development at 
Litton are programs in image analysis 
to aid experts in studying surveillance 
photographs, and the enhancement of 
radar identification of multiple aircraft. 



FLEXING AGAIN Frank Hogg 
Laboratory (FHL) and Technical 
Systems Consultants (TSC) have entered 
into an agreement making FHL a 
nationwide distributor of TSCsFLEX- 
based software. 

Now available through FHL dealers 
are such programs as: 68000 Cross 
Assembler, Text Editor, Pascal, X- 
BASfC and Diagnostics for 6809. 



SOFTWARE ON VIDEO TAPE 

Creative Technical Consultants (CTC) 
has introduced a catalog/ video tape of 
CoCo products for teachers which 
make it possible for them to preview 
educational software. The tape takes 
the instructor through each program as 
a student would see it — from the title 
screen, through the menu, over some 
sample problems, and finally to the 
scoring and reward displays. 

CTC says the video tape solves the 
preview privilege vs + piracy software 
problem the company has encountered 
in the rJast since all of its educational 
programs are written in basic. Teachers 
may preview the programs at no charge; 



the tape must be returned in 30 days. 
Write to 1 66 Sangre de Cristo, P.O. Box 
652, Cedar Crest, NM 87008, 



TESTING, TESTING - The interna- 
tional Bureau of Software Test has 
expanded its services to include "quality 
assurance services" for technical man- 
uscripts. Their service is designed to 
accommodate publishers of computer 
books and manufacturers of software. 
The company is an affilitate of Prentice- 
Hall. Write to 165 Forest Street, 
Marlboro, MA 01752. 



GETTING ORGANIZED Buddy 
Systems has introduced Paper Catcher, 
a unique solution for handling contin- 
uous forms generated by computer 
printers. With the new product, printed 
pages stack neatly on top of the printer. 

Paper Catcher requires no more 
space than the printer itself and will 
neatly refold and stack checks, pages, 
labels and any continuous forms. It has 
vinyl "feet "for added stability, and does 
not interfere with the printer operation 
in any way. 

Write to Buddy Products, 1 350 South 
Lcavitt Street, Chicago, 1L 60608. 



FREEBIES — Because of an advertising 
ommission due to an oversight at 
RAINBOW, Ross Litton wants us to pass 
along a reminder that free printer 
tutorials are still available with the 
purchase of the Epson RX-80FT+ from 
Howard Medical Computers. 

With the purchase of any monitor 
from Howard, you get free reverse video 
capabilities. The company recently 
expanded its line of monitors to include 
the 141 Roland 14-inch Color Monitor 
with sound and 270 x 270 dot resolution. 



THE WORD A new line of Biblical 
software for use with church groups has 
been introduced by Manna Computing 
Concepts. In its catalog, Manna notes 
that personal computers are becoming 



major channels of information in 
society. "Already, we see many software 
programs with definite themes of 
witchcraft, violence and death," note 
the owners in their most recent catalog. 
Manna hopes to reinforce traditional 
values through fun, educational 
programs. 

To provide encouragement to the 
developers of such software, Manna 
encloses a response card in each 
package asking the user to provide 
feedback. The responses will be pub- 
lished in Manna's next catalog. Write: 
P,0, Box 527, Woodstock, GA 30188. 



* * * 

ALL YOL1 EVER WANTED TO 
KNOW — Anchor Automation has 
published an eight-page Guide to 
Modems, which is available free to 
consumers through participating retail 
outlets, 

The pamphlet includes definitions of 
terms, along with explanations of 
operation principles, how Baud rates 
are determined, various tips on increased 
efficiency, and advice on software, 
installation and troubleshooting. 

Dealer requests should be addressed 
to: Anchor Automation, Inc., 6913 
Valjean Avenue, Van Nuys, CA 91406. 



FUNDING SOURCE — Need help 
funding computer education at your 
school? Career Publishing, Inc. is 
sponsoring a $500,000 program to 
provide computer courseware and 
training for elementary, secondary and 
post-secondary teachers and ad- 
ministrators* 

A grant entitles the recipient to offer 
qualified instructors a workshop in the 
methods and techniques required to 
effectively teach others to use computers 
as problem-solving tools, develop and 
enhance critical thinking skills, teach 
computer literacy applications and 
develop ^Information Age^employment 
skills. 

Write to Career Publishing, Inc., 910 
North Main Street, Orange, CA 92667. 



120 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



PECTRUM P 
SHOPPING 




A CHIP OFF THE OLD... 

6821 Standard PIA ........$9.95 

6809E CPU Chip (NEW LOW PRICE) ...$19.95 
27128 16K DOS Eprom (or 2 DOS' s !). $19.95 
68766 (Fits Disk Basic Skt) Eprom. $24. 95 
New SAM Chip~w7heatsink (74LS785). $29.95 
Ext Basic 1.1 ROM NEW LOW PRICE. $29. 95 
28 pin Ext Basic-upgrade 26-3134A p $34.95 
Basic ROM 1.2 Chip (301 FASTER) ..$39.95 
Disk ROM 1.1 (New DOS Command) ..$39,95 
Eprom Eraser - 3 min erasure time. $49.95 
L ower Kit Bd - Specify CoCoI/I I**. $59. 95 
CoCo First Aid Kit - includes 2 PIAs f 

6809E & SAM (Be Prepare d!!!) $59.95 

26-31 34A & 2J^3f36A 64K Upgrade - 2 chip 
set ( ONLY for new Korean CoCoIIA).$69.95 
Eprom Prgmr (2ms speed/2K - 16K).$139.95 
64K CoCo II -~w7NEW keyboard $169.95 



COCO Lll 

CoCo Memory Map ...$12.00 

Rainbow Book & Tape of Adventures. $14. 95 
Basic Programming Tricks Revealed. $14.95 
The FACTS - Inside "guts" of CoCo. $14.95 

500 Pokes, Peeks 'N Execs $16.95 

Basic 09 Tour Guide . $18.95 

Disk Basic (1.0/1.1) Unraveled ...$19.95 

New! CoC o U Service Manual .. $19.95 

The Complete Rainbow Guide to 0S9. $19.95 
W/Two Disk Package of demo pgms ..$49.95 
Col or /Ex tended /Disk Basic Unraveled - 
Complete 3 Book Set - Save $10! ..$49.95 



28pin/24gin Adapter - Plug-in 27128 & 
27256 Eproms in 24 pin sockets ...$19.95 
CoCo Freeze Frame - Stop your CoCo dead 
in its tracks! Put games on "H0LD f, $19.95 
CoCo Light Pen with 6 programs ...$24.95 
S pectrum Voice Pak - SAVE $30!! ..$39.95 
PBH Parallel Interface - Beats Botek ! 
300-9600 baud w/ptr-modem switch .$69.95 
PBJ WORD- PAK II - Hi -Res 80x24 display 
w /smooth scrolling & 8x10 matrix $139.95 

Amdek Twin 3" Drive System ..$199.95 

Amdek Drive System w/cont roller .$299.95 

AH orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) 
COD add $2.00 extra 
NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



t AND... 

Printer /Modem 15' Extender Cable ,$14.95 
11**4 of unplugging devices from your 
RS232 port? Try a R5232 ^ Cable. $19. 95 
J oystick /M ouse 10' Extender Cable. $19. 95 
Null Modem Cable - 4 pin to DB25 .$24.95 
Disk Interface/R om Pak Extende r - Move 
your disks & ROM Paks (3 feet) ..$29.95 
JriPl^_?^32_ Switcher - Now select one 
of any three RS232 peripherals ...$29,95 
*5™fi!!^ D y3l_"Y^_Cable - Hook up a Disk 
■w/Voice, Word Pak, CoCo Max, etc ,.$29.95 
Tr iple "JoyEort" Switcher - Joystick, 
Mouse, Touch Pad and/or Light Pen $39.95 
40 Pin Triple "Y" Cable - Hook up any 3- 
Voice7Word/RS232/Digitizer PAKs ..$39.95 
Finally ! 24" Multi Pak Extender ..$39.95 

OTHER QOOD STUFF... 

C-1Q t apes in any quantity .....49 cents 
5 1/4 " Diskettes in any quantity .,$1,49 
Joystick, Cassette or Serial plug ,$2.99 

32K g 64K or 128K RAM Button $4.99 

Rompafc w/Blank PC Brd-27xx series .$9.95 
The Disk Doubler - Doubleside your 5 1/4 
diskettes for 160K more storage ,.$19.95 
^jdeo Clear - This cable will re duce TV 
interference created by CoCo! ,.,.$19.95 
Video Reverse r -Reduce eyestrain w/ green 
letters on black background** ..,,$24.95 
The Magic Box - Load Mod I /III Basic 

program tapes into the CoCo $24.95 

DOS Switc her - Select from any two DOSs 
(Disk 1.0 1.1, JDOS) in J&M ctlr .$24.95 
Stereo Pak - Hard ware synthesizer used 
w/Musica 2. , . superb stereo sound! $39.95 
EARS-CoCo's first Voice Recognition unit 
w/95% accuracy & 64 V oice Prints ! $99.95 
** N T for 26-31 3475TCoCo II "s 

SPECTRUM PROJECTS 



93-1 B B6TH DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN NY 11 

71 8-441 -2B07 




rra 




h«l 







SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 
COLORFUL COMPUTING 



SPREADSHEET 



M 




{Competition! IDYHACALC 

Screen 32X16 51X24 
Precision 9 digits 16 digits 
Hi-Res Graphics NO YES 
Visicalc cmd format NO YES 
Kew low price) 64K Disk $79,95 
Side Wise -Print DYNACALC files 
up to 255 e ha r s- s i deway s ! $ T 9 - 9 5 



an iiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii m 



DISK DRIVES 



DRIVE System* - SS/DD, 6ms, 
40 Tracks, Half Height .$229.95 
D RIVE g & 2 System* - $349,95 
D isk Drjve 1, 2 or 3 - $139.95 

Two Drive Cable ..$24.95 

D isk Controller w/o ROM $99.95 
Controller w/1.1 ROM - $119.95 
* PLUS: controller-manual-cable 



UTILITIES [DISK) 




Graphicom Part II ,..$24.95 
Spect'm Adv Generator$29.95 
CoCo Calligrapher ,,,$29.95 
Musica 2 (New pnce).$29.95 

Bjork Blocks $34.95 

FHL 0-PAK ..... $34.95 

CoCo Accountant II ..$34.95 
FULL Basic Compi ler! . $69.95 

iiiiiiiiri i — art 




DATA BASE MANAGER 



PRO-COLOR FILE 2.0 - 60 Data 
Fids, 8 Report Fmts, 4 Screen 
Fmts, 1020 bytes/record, Sort. 3 
Fields, Global Search, FAST ML 
Sort, Create Files C ompatible 
w /D YNACALC ! - Disk $59.95 
PCF Forms 2.0- Merge DATA files 
frorrfPCF to Letter/ Forms. $29. 95 



iriiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiHiiiiiHriiiimiiiomii 



E 



m 



GAME CONTROLLERS 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Graphicom Joystick - Has 2 Fire 
buttons ( menu /pen), smooth and 
easy joystick control - $24_95 
Mach \_l Joystick - 360 Degree 
control with center return or 
analog positioning. - $39,95 
Wi^co Comm and Control - Hook up 
2 Atari type joysticks - $19,95 



1 



Jb 



256K CORNER 



Thunde r RAW - First 256K memory 
Bd for CoCo f Load 4 32K pgms at 
once, emulate a 40 trk Ramdisk , 
20K Print Spooler, fast access) 
All orders 4 to 6 wks del > very* 
Thunder RAM Bd w/o 256K .$59-95 
Thunder RAM Bd w/256K ..$149_95 
256K CoCo w/Ext Basic ..$299.95 

HOT AVAILABLE VET FDR CDCD II'I 



Ik 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

PO BOX 21272 93-15 86th DRIVE 

WOODHAVEN NY 11421 



Ail orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00) - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

SOFT AND HARD WARES FOR 
COLORFUL COMPUTING 



m 



a 



COMMUNICATION 



COLOftCOM/E - A complete smart 
terminal package! Upload, 
Download, Hi-Res (51X?4) 
screen, 300/1200 Baud, Offline 
Printing. Rornpak/Disk* - $49.95 
* - Now with CqCq Si_g & TBBS 
XMODEM supports Download Mt ! 
CO MPUSER VE 5hr Start Kit $39-95 



m 




WORD PROCESSING 



TEtEWRUER-64 Three Hi -Res 

screens, true lowercase char's 
right justify, full screen 
editor, plus menu-driven T/0 & 
format. Tape $49,95 Disk $59,95 
W|Z - New character set t true 
descenders & Ylsable end of 
line markers for tW-64' $19.95 



^^m i i ner mai m:i 5 i up i. w yji ■ jti 7.7J 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiHniiiniinniniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 



m 



MODEMS 




MINI-MODEM - Direct connect, 
300 Baud, Orig/Answer - $64-95 
*?z£6I Modem - towest priced 
auto/answer modem - $119-95 
HAYES SM300 - "Programmable" 
auto-dial /auto answer - $199-95 
300/1200 Baud Modem! - $199-95 
Prices include Modem cable. 



mnnnnnmrnimmnnniin 



KEYBOARDS 



§UPER-PR0 {Mark Data) $59-95* 
KEYTRONICS keyboard $69.95** 

H J 15 7_ PROFE SSIONAL - $79.95** 
Specify Model/Revi s ion Board. 
* Add $5 for M F" board adapter 
** Free function key software 
CpCo JI HJL version available!! 
15 key Numeric Ke ypad - $79,95 




PRINTERS 



GEMINI SG-10 - 120 cps w/true 
descenders, 2K buffer, tracL- 
fnct feed T Near tetter Quality 
mode, 1 Yr. warranty! - $249.95 
PBH CoCo Interface - Save $40 
*7SG£L0 - $49.95 (Reg„$89.95) 
Beats Blue Streak & Botek, auto 
Baud rates & ptr-modem switch!! 



MONITORS 



TAXAN Tuner 

monitors into TV sets!!! 

UnWersaj Video Driver - Works 

w7a11 monitors & CoCos 1 - 1Z9_95 



SAVE $10 



OFF COLORCOM/E WITH ANY MODEM 
OFF TELEWRITER-64 WITH ANY PRINTER, 
KEYBOARD OR MONITOR 



SAVE $10 



B 



™N0CHR0ME Monitors - 80x24 
screens pfus Hi-Res w/AUDlO! 
Green - $99.95 Amber - $119,95 
13" COlOR Monitor - $249.95 
Converts composite 
$99.95 



1 



FOR EXPRESS ORDERING PLEASE CALL 718-441-2807 



More Patches 
For EDTASM 



By W.C Clements, Jr* 



Disk EDTASM+ is an extremely 
powerful package. In some 
ways, it is a major improvement 
over the old cartridge program. The 
program disk holds two versions: 
regular EDTASM \ which works much 
like the original program, and an 
overlay version that frees memory by 
reading in, or "overlaying," sections of 
the code as they are needed rather than 
keeping the whole thing in memory at 
once. 

The overlay version is especially 
valuable to the serious machine language 
programmer because it allows the 
source file to be broken up into several 
separate units for editing and storage 
to disk. They can then be assembled 
together using the INCLUDE com- 
mand. I have used this feature to 
assemble, in a single pass, source files 



(Dr. Bill Clements, a professor of 
chemical engineering at the University 
of Alabama, designs peripherals and 
programs for his department *s student 
computer facility (all CoCos). His 
major interests are in process control 
and microcomputer applications*) 



that total more than 2100 lines; try that 
with a run-of-the-mill editor/ assembler? 

Roger Schrag has written several 
articles in the rainbow that presented 
some very useful patches for the 
original, cassette-based version of 
EDTASM*. Those modifications gave 
CoCo owners a fine disk-oriented, 
program-development tool even before 
Radio Shack brought out their Disk 
EDTASM+, and many readers, includ- 
ing myself, have benefited greatly from 
Schrag 's work. 

An irritating feature of all versions 
of EDTASM* has always been the 
relentless one-byte-per-line listing of the 
ASCII equivalents of each character in 
every FCC (Form Character Code) 
string. That listing wastes considerable 
paper when printing an assembly, and 
gives little or no useful information. 

Big jobs especially tend to have lots 
of prompts or other titled output, for 
which the original operation of the FCC 
pseudo-op effectively discourages get- 
ting a printed listing at all. Schrag fixed 
this "FCC bug" in the original ED- 
TASM+ by poking an RTS op code 
into the routine that printed those bytes 
(see the March 1984 RAINBOW for his 
fix, Page 160). 



Radio Shack and Microsoft didn't fix 
the "FCC bug 1 * when they brought out 
the newer Disk EDTASM*, unfortu- 
nately. Ill give you the proper locations 
to insert Schrag's fix for the regular file 
(named EDTASM) and also for the 
overlay version (EDTASMOV), both 
of which are part of the Disk ED- 
TASM* package from Radio Shack. 

To fix the FCC bug, first place the 
program disk in your drive, type LORDM 
"EDTASIT and ENTER, Then type POKE 
&H3C04.&H39, ENTER and save the file 
back to another formatted disk using 
5RVEM ~EDTRSf1'\&HlG00,&H4R 
?F,&H1G00 enter. The procedure to 
fix the overlay version is similar: LQRDM 
"EDTR5MQV" and ENTER; POKE 
&H4048 T &H39 and ENTER; SRVEM "ED- 
TRSMOV " , &H1G00 , &H517F , &H1600 
and ENTER. 

These modifications have made Disk 
ED TASM+ a far greater pleasure to use 
for all sizes of jobs. Thanks to Roger 
Schrag for inspiring the fixes listed here. 
TheyVe saved me a good half-box of 
paper over the last year. 

(Any questions about these modifi- 
cations may be directed to Mr. Clements 
at P.O. Box 2662, University, AL 
35486, phone (205) 348-6450.) ** 



124 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



** FOURTH ANNIVERSARY SALE ** 



To help celebrate Spectrum Projects 
Fourth year in supporting the CoCo, we 
are offering a truly unbelievable once 
in a lifetime deal! Buy any software 
from our 2 page "Colorful Utilities" ad 
and get a set of [8] 64K CoCo chips for 
only $14,951 Offer is limited to one set 
per customer and expires 07/10/85. 
Order now as quantities are limited! 
Sorry, no rainchecks! 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR BOTH COCO I & COCO II INCLUDED 1 





MA9£ 



FEATURE PACKED 

- Pull-Down Menus 

- Undo your mistakes 

- Full graphic editing 

- "Point-and-CIIck" 

- Fat Bits "Zoom* 

- Hardware ROMPAK 

Requires Multi- 
64K DISK $69.95 



SYSTEM : 

- Icons & Font Styles 

- Full Size Screen Dump 

- 32 paintbrush shapes 

- Use w/video digitizer 

- 256x192 joystick input 



■Pak or Y-Cabie 

Y-CABLE $29.95 




SHIPPING $3.00 (FOREIGN $5.00) - COD $2.00 EXTRA - NY RES. ADD SALES TAX 



PO BOX 21272 93-15 86TH DRIVE 
WOOD HAVEN NY 11421 

COD ORDER HOT LINE 718-441-2807 



0- COLORFUL UTILITIES <!><iM> 



COCO CHECKER # 



Someming possibly wronfl with your CoCo ??? CoCo CHECKER is the answer!! Will lest your ROMs, 
RAMs, Disk Drives & Controller, Printer, Keyboard, Cassette, Joysticks, Sound, PIAs. VOG, Internal 
Clock Speed, and more!M6K TAPE/DISK $19.95 (See Jan '85 Rainbow Review) 



MULTI-PAK CRAK 



Save RQMPAKs tu your G4K Dish system using the RS Multi-Pafc Interface. Eliminate constant 
plugging ^ of ROMPAKs now by keeping all your PAK software on disk , Includes PQKEs fm 
"PROBLEM" ROMPAKs, (Megabug, Micro Painter, Stellar Lifeline, etc.. } DISK $24.95 



TAPE N IMAGE 



Easily handles programs with auto loaders , no headers, no EOF markers , unusual size blocks and 
more! Now is the time to get your tape software collection protected .-. against loss!!! TAPE $24.95 



SPIT l\l IMAGE 



, super upgrade from Disk Omni Clone! Back ev erything up! This amazing program handles "non 
tandard " disks witn ease. We haven't found any disk yet that it can't handle. Don't ever be caugh t 
ithout a backup again! Lowest price too! Beats most "copy protection 1 1 programs! 32K DISK $29-95 



COCO SCREEN DUMP 



Tne best screen dump program for the Epson & G emini printers ever! Have the option of s tandard 
or reverse images w /regular or double sued pictures. B00-9600 Baud too! A must for Graph icom and 
Biork Block users. 16K TAPE/DISK $19.95 (see Nov T 34 Rainbow Review) 



DISK UTILITY S.1 # 



A multi - featured tool for USER FRIENDLY disk handling. Utilize a directory windo w to s electively 
sort, move, rename and kill file entries. Lightning fast Disk I/O for format , copy and backup. 
Examine contents of files, the Granule Table, plus the size, load addresses and entry points of an 
programs. Single command execution of both Basic and ML programs. 32K/64K Disk $24*95 (see Oct 
'84 Rainbow Review) 



MASTER DESIGN 



A text designer / editor to generate graphics m ode lettering with multiple font sizes, textures, 
shadowing and thicknesses, plus special patterns for creative backgrounds, Comes with a screen 
print routine and Letter Head Utility that interfaces with T elewriter-64 and BASIC . DISK $29,95 
(see July '84 Rainbow Review) 



SPECTRUM DOS 



Add 24 NEW disk commands with 2 Hi -Res screens! Supports 40 track & D ouble -Sided drives, fast 
stepping rates, auto disk search,, line numbering, error trapping & " EPRQMABLE ". 64K DISK $49-95 



SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR 



Save tim e and design pro looking diagrams using a 480X540 pixel worksheet w/6 viewing windows . 
Over 30 electronic sym bols w/J_0 definab le sy mbols . Print hard copy ana save to di^ 64K DISK 
JfrfliSgNew LOW price!!! $29.95 (see Jan '84 Rainbow Review) 



CQLORAMA 



A tirst-class Bulletin Boara package*,, especially geared towards CoCo users ... has an ordering 
section for those who want to run a mail - order business,., supports Color Graphics -, one nice preee 
ot work. 64K DISK $99,95 July '84 Rainbow. NEW! CQLORAM A BBS Time Module $59.95 



COCO CHECKBOOK 



Use your CoCo to keep track of your checking and savings accounts! Printout individual personal 
Checks! 32K/64K TAPE $29.95 DISK $39.95 (see April '85 Rainbow Review) 



NOW AVAILABLE BY EXPRESS 

AT YOUR LOCAL Radio /hack STORE - 

#90-0283 COCO CHECKER - #90-0890 DISK UTILITY S.1 
..^......^.^c,! ASK TO SEE THE DEMO DISK !!! 



The fastest Disk copier ever! Will format and backup a diskette in only one pass and can make up 
to 4 Disk copies at once in 2 minutes ! The must utility for every Disk owner. 32K/64K DISK $19.95 
(see Way "84 Rainbow Review) 



COCO VIDEO TITLER 



Start your VCR tapes with da zzling title frames followed by professional countdown to black fnde- 
outs! t6K TAPE $19.95 



AUT-O-STAHT 



Autostart your Bas ic/ML programs with impressive title screens using a mixture ot text ana 
graphics! 16K TAPE $19.95 (see June '85 Rainbow Review) 



64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE 



Take advantage of sn expanded 64K machine. Make an additional 8K of RAM available. Copy ROM 
cartridges to disk and create a 32K SPOOL buffer for printing- DfSK $21.95 "(nee duty '83 RaSnoow 

Review) 



TAPE/DISK UTILITY 



A powerful package that transfers tape to disk and disk to tape automatically. Does an automatic 
copy ot an entire d fsk of programs to tape, ideal for Rainbow On Tape to disk. TAPE/DISK $24.95 
(see Sept 'S3 Rainbow Review) 



FAST TAPE 



Save and toad cassette files at twice the speed! Now you can run tape and printer I/O operations 
in the fugfl speed mode without a locked up system or I/O ERRORS! "if you are tired of waiting for 
tho^e long tapes to load, I strongly recommend that you buy this fine utility." TAPE $21.95 July '83 
Rainbow 



GRAPHICOM 



The ultimate CoCo graphics development tool with sophisticated editing, preview animation, 
telecommunications and printer support. Hi-Res graphics for only $24.95. W/Speetru n's Menu Foot 
Switch $34,95 or W/Spectrum's Graphicom Joystick $49.95. 64K DISK (see April '84 Rainbow Review) 



EZ BASE 



A truly user friend )y ^ ata base program at an affordable price. Maintain inventories, hobby 
collections, recipes, greeting card lists and much, much more! Hi-Res screen, up to 500 records with 
15 fields , record or field search, and a Mailing Labels option. 32K DiSK $24.95 (see July '84 Rainbow 
Review) 



BLACKJACK ROYALE 



A Hi -Res graphics casino blackjack simulation and card counting tutor. Fully realistic play includes: 
double down, splits, surrender, insurance bets, 1-8 decks, burnt cards, shuffle frequency and more! 
"This fine program is a must for the CoCo Blackjack player." (Auq r 83 Rainbow Review) 32K 
TAPE/DISK $24.95 (also see Dec '84 Rainbow Review) 



orders plus $3.00 S/H (Foreign $5.00> - COD add $2.00 extra - NYS Residents add Sales Tax 



O BOX 21272 

WOODHAVEN MY 1142 



EXPRESS ORDERING 718-441-2807 

DEALER/CLUB INQUIRIES INVITED 
SOFTWARE SUBMISSIONS WELCOMED 



| GRAPHICOM/ WDEQ DJEJTJZEH 

^| I Inpul diroctly inl« Graphicorrv <i>r ejjvY enhancement n-vimpi.il.Ui mi ^.Liniu.iig and tUouge Catalog rill 
. ^P v uji 1-jvu.nie yiriwi photm*, nl your friends lamily mo** & IV rtiarane-rs on oishtMu 
■■ Achats EOTionsire video 5<yna( mil Ov v KHffln ntttt cetera VCR vleo dTSc playc anoihei cam 
lh niher LiompaPPie' video somces 

oil gn fli V(!B digitized video al dose In re,il lime SrwpsTiDl video Imwh to 11*0 
flower 9 ftrttri 
ion 1 il t Ihji sii 

UM with irtiur muiii Oj* or « y Ldcm? i f tame available «f nv W) 

VidH iv irmuT vid p GNG cnnnBCloT Etifftltfl Mnft lm HORIZON TAI PA Si TIOIM V t Fl ■ >CAt Pfl&l 
HON HQW/flfelAL fliMH BfflfiHIWSS rtilfl tONIRASI (»U/;i s*||irtq'j 
Dqn I r>e l^ulcd by IfTldSHOnS IhiS \% Ihir tiRAPHiCOtt Mil DJClT iZCH f 

fHftini v iripuis into O'ipriicnrn iltie original desiqn by CHeslwe UE me HUH Ififll hrouc-ni 
tit jphimm lo me COCO world I 

REQUIRES 64K COCO. 1 DISK DRIVE, AttO I ANALOG JOYSTICKS FREE GRAPH! COM PROGRAM 
1 PICTURE DISK AND GRAPHIC™ UTILITY SUPPLIED WITH PURCHASE OF *i flft qf 



$199.95 




SUPER BACK-UP UTILITY© 

WITH SflU FflOM CQMPUTiZE YOU Ll 
dEVER HEED ANOTHER BACK-UP UTILITY FOR 

yoiiH cuco"> 

SUPfR BACK-UP UTILITY WILL PERFORM ALL OF 

THE FOL LOWING FutlCHQNS 

1 TAPE TO TAPE (Regdroieu g) mosi proiecuun 

schemes' | 
? TAPE TO DISK IUovb CBSSittl programs |o 

QtiVl 

3 AU10 RELOCATE if of tnose Uassetie programs 

Srial LDnNiCi WITH IJi-,i- Qpeialwg 5ySleirtS | 
4. DISK TO TAPE iPlace QfSK urograms onlo 

£jfi$rijj i 
5 DISK TO BISK I poweMuJ Spln-*J- image Program 

£opje& recjiiruies^ Ql protection schemes 1 ) 

* MENU DRIVEN 

* REQUIRES icK EXTENDED CQGD 

* REQUIRES l OR Z DRIVES i For [„- rt Funclionsi 
- filA MACHINE LAHGUAGErfl 

CDMPAAf WITH OTHER INDIVIDUAL PH0GHAM5 
COSTING IN EXCESS Of S>OQ-OD III 

DISK $49.95 Cai.No. 1D7C0 



WKft w 


WIMP 1 WAV 


I F7;:: 


frpf ,^ 


I n "," 


ftltf "fiftW" 


d 


CI L'l 


■ dl ™ *tm* 


Ift&ll Fftifc 


IlOU 


^a a 


jfl 




GflAPHlCOM 


MAIN MENU 



SPIT-N-IMAGE© 

'.'■•'. NiSK liiCt up Uiiiny 
tn.&r* Is no need lo SuHtf the hearl&reah ol crashed 
flfeks any tonger Spil N- Image wt\\ G^eaift a onrroi 
imag^ u1 yDtir *aiuflOi* UriJf pro^Nimii whKO 00 ntll 
Ttspoim lu normat oacn-up luntliotu Will also in 
indue dno uatHup m one pass Dara piocea^tigi 
B^fMiili ilwayS insist Qi ridM-my i ru<:k up — ll s 
9DP0 pcacijce -- tJrjn i v< i.i' 

REQUIRES 32K CC 



GRAPHICOM FONT PAGE 



DISKS34.95 



Cat. No. 101CD 



TRIPLE TRANSFER UTILITY© 

Translei conltnli^l o-^ Dfi la[>B ■ Frut^r corner 
al lap* to flisK » -seaeci or AH" Opliw ■ Wm 
iuiamjnejil> rciotalE ino^e CdiieUt prag^arns thai 
.-.oriliict wilh lha disk operaimg Svsrem - Win 
display rrritmne languasje prqojram ad die Si * 
£<*W$ ASCu. Basic. S Machine Language Pro 
grants ■ All contained m 1 m«nu driven profffam JI 
RE QUIA IS 32K CC EXT 

C«SDtt&Sl9.95 Cat. «0, 105CT 

Disk S^4.95 . Cat. No, 105CD 





Cat. No 135HR 



MASTER KEY £ 1984 



ONLY 
$99.95 




€3. H I IP* 



nPMDA . &£ X 






ITLI «e - ^E T - 



i;y. G-C II FONT DISK 



©1934 WHITESITIITH VI 1,0 



CRAPHICUM PART ][ n 2 nrnnu-flnven graphics uMiiy Ihai dD6& not requirif 
{Tie original GRAPHICOM lo iuii. II mcluttes many ol the functions trill are 
missing in GRAPHICOM and will Load and save bolh STANDARD (binary ) and 
GRAPHICOM rOrflHI screens GRAPHICOM PART |[ rsquirB£ a 64K Calcr 
Compular at Color Computer If, and at least one disk drive. H snppmk 1 la 4 
iSisk driven keyboard or |oyslir.t mpul. COLOR Or B/W llH-TOS] flDflrsiion 
artO 4 screen display modas OOPS cummarrd pmv:ds& reca*ery dlter 
mislsliHS. and allows expflfimeniing Sopped an disk with a 94 page 
manual. 

GRAPHICOM PART II-S24.95 



GRAPHICOM $24.95 

Simply dialed Unt Si 1 the hn*sl grapim |)rn- 

grami wnnen in live Cmv Ua.npuier' 

EEATUfltS 

• U ST * f "-'E M Cm > 

• 4 OiBplif muim.rHiCiuOMlig Hi FleS J Hi ■ i#'u& ,n 
lilactl 

• Douk P*iitiie w^b orer i J > tola' paller'ts 1w vie 
A.lh Ki Rts Bibtel 

» SenO'FlUC&Me p«c!u**f g««i HJndJH) rttaown a1 

abo 6D(} n iJuuiHod 

■ Supiiir^ uiilil^ allows uaplu'irifl mPes Str^tfli 
ipcm rwai coco iredfle q^t^ itvtf proiecidd 

rjneij 

• Muiiipuj Hi Res cnAfaeto tonis Lussl '« 
d^Nnabicr 

• SuouiiM udNv rrjr rran^wrmg Dir^pnir-Ofn 
■Mreeflsi lo U^s-c o' ulner Mri. pr&gunvi 

• SupplipO liriMf ^ loarting st^ns Irwn Ba'iir or 

«ner sources 
- B.iiH io Hi-Rb* &CHEE*I fC'Nl |HjmpJliblB*iLh 

iPSOJt c iitm- QtMrNl'tti 0^ plus fliflJB 
5h*K i LP-VII 1PVH1 DMP ]BQ DMPJQff 
jfid tCP I n ln inters h irom i mic QfcOO twufi 

• Siow scan itiPHS'w SEHD^ntCEivL opiiann 

m Ud»f .inniiriHuMHlu res. aoe^kig turns nirO 

#are Tinfl a rtnO iii^geiln^ii u!l' 

■ EASY TO LEAHH GRAFHIC MENU » 

REQUIRES «K C0CU. 1 UfllVf SfSHH fl«D 

? ANALOG JOYSTICKS 



PICTURE DISKS $9.95 

Available Iron COMPUTIZE 

Ariitaci color paieue 

Lj^fflj character sets drawn flilri ifiastei 

design Utnrn Cerr rnq.er Sollware) 

Same aa it Qui sel op d^i slamp h1 

Misce]laneoo& Art Se! # 1 

Misceltaneous Art Sel *? 

Mi5tfiiiajn«n*i Ads ^nrj £^ar>»pl«r& 

Miscellaneous Funis 

ArtiWi color paieue typu larna 

Art demo from WHITESWHH 
Color Hi-re&artwtMhslrrjm Whilesmith. Ihe peu 
pie mat urouyhl yon Grsphicom Part ||. hi- 
lrgtfuted Py ananimaifefl marching uaud peffot- 
mmg a Sousa marcn m 4 -par I harmony 1 

13C- GRAPHICOM PART II Igncliufi flemu 

'>- GCfl FONT DISKS 

Each rjisk contain^ 40 tn more lonl hifls ( 10 or 
mnrfe GRAPHICOM PART |( Tonls 4 versions Of 
each, one lor each display mode) arm Hlfftfl 
"FONT JNOEX" screens to make identical ion 
dng seltcncn easy 
14C-QCN Fpnl&OrSk tT 
ISC - GCII Fonts Disk #2 
ieC ■ GCU fonts Dtsk (13 



PftM. & 



00" 





See your screens magmlierJ Jx 4a. 
or SV Draw oi lyuch up m eilher 
cgiyi 1 Qi B/W ( in -ran | made Ex- 
ceiienr 1o> line aetai. worh 




Add lype in i6diM^eni si^es o^er 
50 colors ol lew. chancier s may ue 
rotated 04 mirrored lo allow lypmg 
in atmosl ahv flireciion 



Reposition arapiiics wilh precision 
aot) ease WRAP AftDUND 
leaturs pr&wents gr^pPics lrom 
Strolling oM me edge Of the screen 



ROTATE 



ENLARGE 



REDUCE 



Enrarge or redoce any pari oT $ 
sqreen Oy arif amrjurU prcrpnriiunji 
or nonproparliondl Hntalmn ran hi 
anyihmg Irgm V lo 359 deg 




Rep/oduc* -? ml enlarge small areas 
ol ihe screen wUth ";ons oi pa Mem s 
lor Backgrounds, logos, en. Dvft 
ao icons supplied ort disk Ulso 
user rjetmifJtjlej 



More rna»T i}0 oirierem Lpirjieti 
shades and paLlerns a^ailaoie lo^tr 
^UU il you counl me J owa* 
modfls i Additional pfittrrrnr, may 
he user del mud' 



IIIIHIM 



PIXEL 
BLASTER 



SuPBlilulo colors, swap BLUL and 
REO. remove WHUE (removrng all 
cplor widfenn lines !ir pamling 1 ]. 
ueate color separanons 




LDdd &■ Wm'u screen'., in ehi^ej: 
GRAPHICOM or STANDARD lormat 
copy screens from one loirn,ji 1u 

jaotti^r ^ijppnrtii sin(j<eor rtiulliple 
(up IP ^ disd drive system 



CALL OH WRITE 
FOR YOUR SAMPLE 
DIGITIZED PICTURE 

CATALOG TODAV 1 




(21 SJ 946 7260 P.O. BOX 207 * LANGMORNE. PA 1S047 



ATTENTION COCO CLUBS 

CALL OH WRITE FOR 

INFORMATION ABOUT 

SOFTWARE DEMOS 

FORCLUeS. 



How To Read Rainbow 



Please note that all the bas>c program 
listings you will find in the rainbow are 
formatted for a 32-character screen —so 
they will show up just as they do on your 
CoCo screen. One easy way to check on 
the accuracy of your typing is to com- 
pare what character "goes under" what. 
II the characters match — and your line 
endings come out the same — you have 
a pretty good way of knowing that your 
typing is accurate. 

We also have "key boxes 1 ' to show you 
the minimum system a program needs. 
But, do read the text before you start 
typing, 

Finally, the little cassette symbol on 
listings indicates that program is availa- 
ble through our rainbow on tape service. 
An order form for this service is on the 
insert card bound in the magazine- 



What's A CoCo 



reach the end of one of those lines with 
your typing, simply check to see if the 
numbers match. 

To use the Rainbow Check PLUS t 
type in the program and CSftvt it for later 
use. then type in the command run and 
press enter. Once the program has run. 
type new enter to remove it from the area 
where the program you're typing in will 

Now, whenever you press the down 
arrow key, your CoCo will give you the 
checksum based on the length and con- 
tent of the program in memory. This is to 
check against the numbers printed in 
the rainbow. If your number is different, 
check the listing carefully to be sure that 
you typed in the correct basic program 
code. For more details on this helpful 
utility, refer to H. Allen Curtis' article on 
Page 21 of the February 1984 rainbow. 

Since Rainbow Check PLUS counts 
spaces and punctuation, be sure to type 
in the listing exactly the way it's given in 
the magazine. 



When you use an editor-assembler, all 
you have to do, essentially, is copy the 
relevant instructions from the rainbows 
listing into CoCo, 

Another method of getting an assem- 
bly language listing into CoCo is called 
"hand assembly " As the name implies, 
you do the assembly by hand. This can 
sometimes cause problems when you 
have to set up an ORIGIN statement or 
an EQUATE. In short, you have to know 
something about assembly to hand 
assemble some programs 

Use the following program if you wish 
to hand assemble machine language 
listings: 

10 CLEflR200,£H3F00:I=£H3FB0 
20 PRINT "ftDQRES5;";HE:x$(IJ: 

30 INPUT ^BVTE^;B% 

40 POKE LVRLCiH-'+B*] 

50 I^J+l:GDTn 20 

This program assumes you have a 16K 
CoCo. if you have 32K P change the 
&H3F0S In Line 10 to m?rm. 



CoCo is an affectionate name which 
was first given to the TRS-80 Color 
Computer by its many fans, users and 
owners. As such, it is almost a generic 
term for three computers, all of which 
are very much alike. 

When we use the term CoCo, we refer 
to the TRS-80 Color Computer, the TOP 
System 100 Computer and the Dragon- 
32 Computer It is easier than using the 
three "given ,r names throughout the 
rainbow. 

In most cases, when a specie com- 
puter is mentioned, the application is for 
that specific computer. However, smce 
the TOP System-100 and TR3-80 Color 
are, forall purposes, the same com puter 
in a different case, these terms are 
almost always interchangeable. 



The Rainbow Check Plus 



^ 



The small boxes that you see accom- 
panying programs in the the rainbow are 
the 'Check system," which is designed 
to help you type in programs accurately. 

Rambow Check PLUS will count the 
number and values of characters you 
type in. You can then compare the 
number you get to those printed in the 
rainbow On longer programs, some 
benchmark lines are given, When you 



10 CLS:X=25G*FEXK[35]+1?B 
20 CLEGR 25,X-1 
30 X=25G*PEEK [35] +176 
40 FOR Z=X TO X+77 

50 READ V:UI^W+V:PGINT Z,Y;W 

m poke: z,y:NExt 

?0 IFU=?9B5THENe0ELSEPRlNT 

"DRTft ERRQR":5TQP 
aa EXEC X; END 

3® DATA 1S2, l, 106, LG7, 140, 60, 134 
L00 DATE 126, 1E3, I, 106, 190, 1, 10? 
110 DfiTP 175, 140, 50, 49, 140, 4, 151 
120 DATA 1, 107, 57, 129, 10, 30, 38 
130 DATA 52, 22, 79. 15B, 25, 230, 129 
140 DATA 39 T 12, 171, 128, 171, 12fl 
150 DATA 230, 132, 3B, 250, 4B, 1, 32 
168 DATA 248, 193, 2, 222, 43, 140, 14 
170 DATA 159, 166, 1BG, 132, 2B, 254 
193 DATR 189, 173, 199, 53, 22, 126, E 
ig0 DATA 0, 135, 255, 134, 40, 55 
200 DATA 51, 52 t 41, 



Using Machine Language 



Machine Language programs are one 
of the features of the rainbow. There are 
a number of ways to "get" these pro- 
grams into memory so that you can 
operate them. 

The easiest way is by using an Editor- 
Assembler, a program you can purchase 
from a number of sources. 

An editor-assembler allows you to 
enter mnemonics into your CoCo and 
then have the editor-assembler assem- 
ble them into specific instructions that 
are understood by the 6809 chip that 
controls your computer, 



The Rainbow Seal 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 



The Rainbow Certification Seal is our 
way of helping you, the consumer. The 
purpose of the Seal is to certify to you 
that any product which carries the Seal 
has been physically seen by us and that 
it does, indeed, exist, 

Manufacturers of products — 
hardware, software and firmware — are 
encouraged by us to submit their pro- 
ducts to the rainbow for certification. 
We ascertain that their products are, in 
actuality, what they purport to be and, 
upon such determination, award a Seal. 
This lets you know that we have seen the 
product and that it does, indeed, exist. 

The Seal, however, is not a "guarantee 
of satisfaction/ The certification pro- 
cess is different from the review process. 
You are encouraged to read our reviews 
to determine whether the product is 
right for your needs. 

There is absolutely no relationship 
between advertising in the rainbow and 
the certification process Certification is 
open and available to any product per- 
taining to CoCo. A Seal will be awarded 
to any commercial product, regardless 
of whether the firm advertises or not. 

We will appreciate knowing of in- 
stances of violation of Seal use. 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 129 



MUSIC 



Chopin's Minute Waltz 



By Eugene Vasconi 



'ho needs the stereo when 
/ you've got ihc CoCo? Here is 
a music program thai brings 
a classical composer up to date. Frederic 
Chopin was born in 1810, composed 
mainly piano dance music, and certainly 
never figured he'd make the CoCo top 
10, but we ih ink he'd be pleased. 

This is the Minute Waltz (it really 
lakes about a minute and a half) and 
is a good example of how to make one 
sound generator seem like four The 
transcription is, with a lew computer- 
necessary adjustments, a faithful trans- 
cription of how Chopin intended it 
even to the dynamics. 

The program uses the PLAY command 
and, by manipulating note lengths and 
voidttg, gives the impression of har- 
mony. A group of biographical pages 
sets the stage for Hi- Res graphics and 
the performance, which concludes in 
grand concert style. The final option 
is to have an encore or end. 

Minute Waltz* requiring KiK b"CB, 
is part of a 10-prograrn series developed 
for educational or home entertainment 



(Eugene Vasconi is a free-lance television 
producer in the Dallas area, interested 
in the musk and graphics aspects of 
the Color Computer, he received his 
undergraduate degree in music and 
holds a masters in telecommunications.) 




THE RAINBOW June 19B5 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COCO & TDP-100 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



MICROARTIST ]££ 

Finally!!! a graphics program so easy to use anyone can create beautiful detailed pictures. Save your 
pictures to tape or disk and incorporate your artwork in your own programs or print it out on your graphics 
printer. MICROARTIST accomodates Gemini, Epson and Radio Shack DMP printers. 

The easy menu selection provides 1 6 modes of operation. Besides the basic GEOMETRIC MODES you 
can ERASE all or part of the screen. ZOOM in on any portion of your picture and the enlarged screen 
allows you to edit your picture pne pixel at a time. GET/PUT allows you to move one area of your picture 
to another part of the screen. SAVE and LOAD your pictures to tape or disk. Choose from 1 00 solid or 
stripe combination colors to PAlNTyour pictures/Add texture to your picture with SPRAY PAINT. Use the 
TEXT mode to sign or label your art work. 

And that's not all! We've even included two utilities to make MICROARTIST even more fun ; The first will 
display all 1 QO color combinations on the screen. Choose the ones you like best for your palette. The 
second utility will copy a picture in basic orassembly language into the MICROARTIST format. You can 

then edit and expand the picture to fit your own needs. 

Take advantage of all the COLOR your COLOR computer has to offer. Order MICROARTIST now. 
Requires 32K Extended Basic and a mouse or joystick. Tape - $24.95; Disk - $29.95 

SCEPTER OF URSEA 

Explore the kingdom of Ursea in search of the elusive sceptor. The country-side is represented by an 
elaborate graphics screen which harbors friend and foe alike. Or enter the dark dungeon, where 
unknown dangers and wealth await you. Roll up your character and set out on a great adventure. 

SCEPTOR OF URSEA is a one player adventure game based in a fantasy world of feudal kings and lords. 
To become king of Ursea you must find the lost sceptor and return it to Ursea, The extensive 
documentation will give you all the information you need to know to travel through Ursea. It is up to you, 
however, to use this information wisely/Are YOU wise enough to become King? 

This adventure is unique in that you may travel through the countryside represented in a graphics 
screen or enter the dungeon and travel through its three levels. You may leave the dungeon to return to 
the outside at any time. And, of course, you can save the game in progress. Req. 32 K EB. Disk only $29.95 

CITY WAR ^^ 

Strategy and politics are the key to winning CITY WAR- This challenging simulation game requires both. 
The two great nuclear powers battle for world supremacy. The object is to eliminate the leader of the 
opposing country. The two leaders are hidden in one of eight major cities of their respective country. Fire 
your missiles at your chosen target or protect your city by firing an anti-ballistic missile. 

This battle of the two great nuclear powers is a two-player game. But, better yet, form two teams and 
make CITY WAR even more realistic by putting your strategic and political decisions to a vote. 

There are 1 4 commands accessed by a single key stroke. With your secret access code you are the only 
one that can command your army of missiles. You can even request a cease fire from your opponent. 
The "save the game" feature makes it easy to resume negotiations. Requires 1 6K. Tape - $24.95; Disk- 
$29.95 

TO PRESERVE QUANDIC 

If you have not been able TO PRESERVE QUANDIC you will be happy to hearthat our hint sheets are 
now available. They are fully coded and will give you only the amount of information you wish to decode. 
$3.95 

1-800-223-5369 Extension 256 

Send for our free Catalog of great Programs for your CoCo 



POLICY ON PROTECTION 

We believe our customers are honest — ail of 
our software can be backed up using standard 
backup procedures. 



Dealer and author inquiries are always wel- 
come. Canadian dealers should contact Kelly 
Software Distributors, Ltd., P.O. Box 1 1 932, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J-3L1 (4Q3) 421-8003 



Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include 
$1 .50 shipping for each program ordered. (Shipping 
free on $50.00 or larger orders), AZ residents add 5% 
sales tax. Orders shipped within two days. 



Stocked by Quality Dealers, or 

Send Order To PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

2640 N. Cpnestoga Ave, 
Tucson, Arizona 85749 
(602) 749-2864 



use featuring great classical composers. 
So, settle back and picture the young 
Chopin traveling the streets of Paris on 
his way to another concert of patrons 
who thrill to his musical acrobatics, and 
in his music case — a CoCo? 

Line Description 



1-2 Title page 



3-11 


Draw three-dimensional 




Wait for perform input 




letters 


79-118 


Play commands for the 


12 


Biographical information 




waltz 


13-39 


Draw small letters 


119-127 


Close curtain sequence 


40-49 


Create piano keyboard 


128-135 


Print replay or end screen 


50-55 


Create border 




and wait for input 


56-64 


Additional biographical 


(Any questions regarding this pro- 




information 


gram may 


be directed to Mr. Vasconi 


65-78 


Paint/ repaint loop for 3-D 


at 1907 Moser, Apt. 207, Dallas, TX 




letters 


75206, phone (214) 826-6244.) 



pv... 


...93 


40 ... . 


...164 


57 .... 


,115 


65 .... 


...239 


87 .... 


...41 


95 .... 


...166 


104 ... 


...69 


113... 


,167 


END.. 


...210 





The listing: MNUTUfiLZ 

1 CLS (3) : PRINTS109 , "waltz " ; s PRIN 
TS174, "BY " i : PR I NTS 199, "FREDERIC 

CHOPIN "; 

2 PR I NT@391," TRANSCRIBED BY " 5 : P 
R I NTS423, "EUGENE VASCONI "; 

3 PM0DE3,1 

4 PCLS(2) 

5 COLORS, 3 



6 DRAM " BM24 ,12; D40F20R32NU 1 2H20N 
L32U40NF 1 2LSD32L4UBNF4LBDBL4U32N 
F16L8" 

7 DRAW " BM6B , 20 3 D32F20RBNU8H20NL8 
UBNF20R 1 6DBNRBF 1 2NL8FBRBNU 1 2H20U 
32NF 1 2HBL 1 6GB 5 BM76 , 36 ; R 1 2NH 1 2R4U 
12H4L8B4D12" 

8 DRAW " BM 1 1 2 , 1 2 ; D40NR32F20R32NUB 
H20U8NF20L4NU 1 2L20U32NF20LB " 

9 DRAW " BM 1 48 , 1 2 ; D8NF 1 2R 1 2D32NRBF 
20R8NU32H20U32NF20R 1 2NF 1 6UBNF20L 
32" 

1 DRAW " BM 1 92 , 1 2 ; D8NF 1 1 R20G20NL4 
D 1 2NR32F20R32NU8H20UBNF20L20U4NF 
4E20F20NQ 1 2UBH20NDBL32 " 

11 PAINT<16,16> ,3,5 

12 CLS (6) :PRINTS9B, "FREDERIC CHO 
PIN WAS BORN IN ZELAZOWA WOL 




132 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



fcSK,,,,^,,,, 



A NEAR WARSAW, 
10. THE SON OF A 
ER, HE TAUSHT 
AND LATER WENT 
AT THE WARSAW 



POLAND IN 18 
FRENCH TEACH 
HIMSELF PI AN 
ON TO STUDY 
CONSERVATORY 



13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

F 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 



DRAW " BM84 , 80 ; G4D8F4 " 

DRAW " BMBB , 92 5 U8R4ND4R4D8 " 

DRAW"BM104,92;UB" 

DRAW " BM 1 1 2 , 92 ; UBFBUB " 

DRAW " BM 1 28 , B4 ; DBR8U8 " 

DRAW " BM 1 44 , 84 ; R4ND8R4 " 

DRAW " BM 1 68 , 92 ; LBU4NR4U4R8 " 

DRAW " BM 1 72 , 80 ; F4D8G4 " 

EE*= " NR8UBNR4UBR8 " 

RR*» " U 1 6RBDBL4NL4F4D4 " 

CC*="NR8U16RB" 

DRAW " BM24 ,178; UBNR4U8RB " 

DRAWBM40, 178; XRR*; " 

DRAWBM56, 178; XEE*; " 

DRAW " BM72 , 1 78 ; U 1 6R4F4D884L4 " 

DRAW"BM8B, 178; XEE* 5 " 

DRAWBM104, 178; XRR*; " 

DRAW"BM120,17B;U16" 

DRAW "BM 128, 178; XCC*; " 

DRAW "BM 152, 178; XCC*; " 

DRAW " BM 1 68 , 1 78 ; UBNUBRBNUBD8 " 

DRAW"BM1B4,17B;U16RBD16LB" 

DRAW " BM200 , 1 78 ; U 1 6R8D8LB " 

DRAW"BM216,17B;U16" 

DRAW " BM224 , 1 78 ; U 1 6F4DBF4U 1 6 " 

COLORS, 5 

LINE(24,104)-(22B,14B) ,PSET,B 



COLOR 3,5 

F0RX-36T02 1 6STEP 1 2 

LINE <X, 104) -(X, 148) ,PSET 

NEXTX 

COLOR 2,2 

FORX-32TO200 STEPB2 

LINE<X,104)-<X+B,132) ,PSET,BF 
iLINE(X+12,104)-(X+20,132) ,PSET, 
BF 

47 NEXTX 

48 F0RX-6BT0152STEP82 

49 LINE<X,104)-<X+8,132),PSET,BF 
« LINE (X+12, 104) -<X+20, 132) ,PSET, 
BFsLINE(X+24,104)-<X+32,132),PSE 
T,BF 

50 NEXTX 

51 F0RX-4T0252STEP4 

52 COLDR 4,3 

53 CIRCLE(X,0) ,4:CIRCLE(X,19B) ,4 
:NEXT 

54 F0RX-4T0198BTEP6 

55 CIRCLE (2, X) ,4i CIRCLE (254, X) ,4 




Meet people making it happen in OS-9. The movers and shakers 
who are helping OS-9 become the fastest growing operating 
system for the 6809 & 68000 in the world. 
Lively arid informative round-table discussions will cover the 
design and use of Microware Software. We'll also discuss OS-9's 
dynamic growth from where we are today to where we may be 
in the future. 

The exhibit area will feature booths from many of the leading 
suppliers of OS-9 compatible hardware and software. It's a great 
opportunity to increase your skill and knowledge in the latest 
microcomputer software technology. Plan to attend — Register 
Today! 

Seminar only $150 Hotel Package* $350 
Location Marriott Hotel, Des Moines, I A 
Don't Miss It — Pre-Register Now! 
Call 515-224-1929 or Write 
MICROWARE SYSTEMS CORPORATION 
1866 N.W. 114th St. • Des Moines, IA 50322 



— 7ruc>tm<mL~— 




*Hotei package includes 3 nights, single occupancy at the Marriott Hotel 

and registration fee. 

OS-9 and BASIC09 are trademarks of Microware and Motorola 

June 1985 THE RAINBOW 133 



:NEXT 

56 CLS<4):PRINT@9B,"AFTER TOUR IN 
G GERMANY AND ITALY, HE MO 
VED TO PARIS AS A PIANO TEACHE 
R. ONCE THERE HE MET AND LIVE 
D WITH WRITER AURORE DUDEV 
ANT (PEN NAME GEORGE SAND) 
. ";;FORX«lTO6000iNEXTX 

57 CLS<7):PRINT@9B,"THE TEMPERME 
NTAL CHOPIN ALWAYS PREFERRED SM 
ALL AUDIENCES TO LARGER CONCE 
RTS AND A HANDFUL OF ONLY 74 M 
AJOR LISTINGS REFLECT THAT 

DESIRE. THEY INCLUDE SCHE 
RZOS, BALLADES, " J 
5B PRINTS2BB," NOCTURNES, MAZUR 
KAS, ETUDES, PRELUDES, AND WA 
LTZES. "sFORX«lTO7000:NEXTX 

59 CLS<5) :PRINTS9B,"IT IS AMAZIN 
G THAT, IN THE SHADOW OF BE 
ETHOVEN, CHOPIN COULD HAVE M 
ADE SUCH A NAME BY WRITING M 
A INLY PIANO DANCE MUSIC. THAT 
HE DID IS A TRIBUTE TO H 
IS TALENT WHICH STILL TAXES 
MANY PIANISTS. " ; 

60 FORX=1TO6000:NEXTX 

61 CLS<6>sPRINT®9B,"THE MINUTE W 
ALTZ IS ONE OF HIS BEST KNOWN C 
OMPOSITIONSj IT SHOWS THE EX 
CITING ACROBATICS AND BROAD, F 
LOWING MELODIES HE COULD CRE 
ATE. IT REALLY DOESN'T TAKE 

A MINUTE - MORE LIKE A MINUT 
E AND A HALF! " ? 

62 FORX=1TO6500:NEXTX 

63 CLS<0> : PR INTQ9B, "CHOPIN ALWAY 
S LONGED TO RETURN HOME AND IT 

SHOWS IN HIS MUSICAL THE 
MES. HE DIED OF TUBERCULOSI 
S IN PARIS IN 1B49. HE WA 
S 39. ";:FORX-1TO5000:NEXTX 

64 PRINT@421,"PRESS <P> TO PERFO 
RM "5 :FORX«1TO1000:NEXTX 

65 PP-0 

66 SCREEN 1,1 

67 R»RND(4) 

68 PP*-INKEY* 

69 IF PP*-"P" THEN FF-1 

70 IF PP-1 THEN R-4 

71 IF R=l THEN 67 

72 PAINT(28,1B> ,R,5 

73 PAINT(72,24) ,R,5 

74 PAINT(116,24) ,R,5 

75 PAINT<164,24) ,R,5 

76 PAINT<216,16> ,R,5 

77 IF PP-1 THEN GOTO 79 
7B G0T067 

79 A-0SB-0 



80 A*= " L3203G02D-P 1 6L 1 603A-P 1 6L6 

404C02A-03D-FP 1 6L 1 6B-P 1 6L64G02 A- 

03D-FP 1 6L 1 6A-P 16" 

B 1 B*- " L3204C02FP 1 6L 1 603B-P 1 6L64 

G02A-03D-FP 1 6L 1 6A-P 1 6L6404C02 A-0 

3D-FP16L16B-P16" 

82 C*» " L3203B-02FP 1 6L 1 604CP 1 6L64 

D-02 A-03D-FP 1 6L 1 604E-P 1 6L64F02 A- 

03D-FP 1 6L 1 604G-P 1 6 " 

S3 D*= " L320 1 A-LB . 04B-P32L6402 A-0 

3CG-P64P 1 6L 1 604 A-P 1 6L64G-02A-03C 

G-P16L1604FP16" 

84 E*- " L3204F02E-P 1 6L 1 604E-P 1 6L6 
4E-02A-03CG-L3204FE-L 1 6DP 1 6L64E- 
02A-03CB-P16PB" 

85 F*- " L3204A-03A-0 1 A-P32PBL6402 
G-A-03CP64P 1 6PBE02G-A-03CP 1 6PB " 

86 PLAY " V23T6 ; L403A-LBGA-04C03B- 
GA-B-A-04C03B-GA-04C03B-GA-04C03 
B-GA-04C03B-" 

B7 PLAY " T6X A* ; V25 ? XB* ; V27 5 X A* % V2 
9; XC*; V31 ; XD*; V23; XE*; V29; XD*; " 
BB PLAY " V24L3204F02 A-P 1 6L 1 604E-L 
32FE-L64D03CB-P64P 1 6L 1 604E-P 1 6L6 
4F03CG-P64P16L1603B-P16; XA*; XB*; 
XA*;V27;XC*;V31;XD*;V24;XE*;V20; 
XD*J " 

89 PLAY " L3204E-02 A-P 1 6L 1 604FP 1 6L 
64E-V2403CG-L3204FE-L 1 6DP 1 6L32E- 
01A-P16L1604EP16" 

90 PLAY " V20L24O4FO 1 AL 1 204G-FL64E 
02F03CE-P 1 6L 1 604FP 1 6L64A-02F03CE 
-P 1 6L 1 604G-P 1 6L32F0 1 B-P 1 6L 1 604G- 
P 1 6L64V22F02F03D-P64P 1 6L 1 604EP 1 6 
L64F02F03D-P64P 1 6L 1 604B-P 16" 

91 A«A+1:B«B+1 

92 PLAY " V24L2404A-02CL 1 204B-A-L6 
4G02A-03E-G-P 1 6L 1 604 A-P 1 6L6405C0 
2A-03E-B-P16L1604B-P16 V27L32A-0 
2D-P 1 6L 1 604B-P 1 6L64A-02A-03FP64P 
1 6L 1 604GP 1 6 A-P 1 605D-P 1 6 " 

93 PLAY " V3 1 L3205C02G-P 1 6L 1 604B-P 
1 6L64 A-02B-03E-P64P 1 6L 1 604G-P 1 6F 
P16E-P16 V25L32D-01A-P16L1604CP1 
6L6403B-02F A-03D-P 1 6L 1 603A-P 1 66- 
P16FP16" 

94 PLAY " V20L32O3E-O 1 A-P 1 6L 1 603D- 
P 1 6L64C02B- A-P64P 1 6L 1 603E-P 1 6L64 
B-02G-A-03CP16L16A-P16 V22L32S02 
D-P 1 6L 1 603A-P 1 6L64B-02A-03D-FP 1 6 
V28L 1 6Q4CP 1 6D-P 1 6E-P 1 6 " 

95 PLAY " L2404F02 AL 1 204G-F V30L64E 
03E-FP64P 1 6L 1 604FP 1 6L64A-03E-FP6 
4P16L1604B-P16 L32F02B-P16L1604B 
-P 1 6L64F03D-FP64P 1 6L 1 604EP 1 6L64F 
03D-FP64P 1 6L 1 604B-P 16" 

96 PLAY " L2404 A-03CL 1 204B- A-L64G0 
3G- A-P64P 1 6L 1 604 A-P 1 6L6405C03G-F 
P64P16L1604B-P16 L32A-03D-P16L16 



134 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 












*»»w**a^ 








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-■-<-fm^ 



04B-P 1 6L64A-Q3F A-P64P 1 6L 1 604GP 1 6 

A-P1605FP16" 

97 IF B-4 THEN GOTO 11 7 

9B PLAY " L3205E-02G-P 1 6L 1 605D-P 1 6 

L64C03D-E-B-P 1 6L 1 604B-P 1 6A-P 1 6B- 

P16 V27L32F01A-P16L1604E-P16L64D 

-02F A-D-P 1 6L 1 604CP 1 603B-P 1 6A-P 1 6 

II 

99 PLAY " V23L3203 AO 1 A-P 1 6L 1 604CP 1 
6L64B-02G-A-P64P 1 6L 1 603FP 1 6L64G- 
02G-A-P64P16L1603CP16 V20L32D-O2 
D-P 1 6PB03F02 A-P 1 6PB " 

100 IF A-2 THEN GOTO 103 

101 PLAY"L504F" 

102 IF A-l THEN GOTO 90 

1 03 PLAY " V2 1 L4D3A-L32 A-D 1 A-P 1 6PB 
L64Q2G- A-03CP64P 1 6P803E-02G-A-03 
CP16PB A-02G-A-03CP16P802B-A-03C 
P64P16PBE02G-A-03CP16P8 V24L32A- 
02D-P 1 6PBA-03D-P 1 6PBL64F02A-03D- 
P64P16PB" 

104 PLAY"V2BL3204F01A-P16P8L6402 
A-03D-FP64P 1 6P804F02A-03D-FP 1 6PB 

L 1 602E-P 1 6P8L6402 A-03CG-P64P 1 6P 
8B-Q2A-03CG-P16P8 L3204F01A-P16F 
BL6402 A-03E-G-P64P 1 6PB04C02A-03E 

—R— PI APR" 

1 05 PLAY " L3204E-02D-P 1 6PBL6402 A- 
03D-FP64P 1 6PBQ4D-D2A-03D-FP 1 6PB 
L3204C02FPBL 1 604E-P64L6402A-03D- 
FP64P 1 6L 1 604D-P 1 6L6402 A-03D-FL 1 6 
B-P32PB L32A-01CP16PB026-A-P16P8 
L6403E-Q2G- A-P64P 1 6PB " 

1 06 PLAY " V20L32O3A-O 1 A-P 1 6PBL640 
2G-A-Q3CP64P 1 6P8E02G- A-03CP 1 6PBV 
24L32A-02D-P 1 6P8Q2A-Q3D-P 1 6PBL64 
F02A-03D-P64P16PB V2BL3204F01BP1 
6PBL6402A-03D-FP64F 1 6PB02A-03D-F 
P&4P 1 £P8 " 

1 07 PLAY " L3204CD2C04DC03BD4CP 1 6L 
64Q3B02A-03CFP 1 6P804C02A-03CFP 1 6 
PB L3204A-01CP16PBL6403B-O2G03CE 
P16PB LBQ4GPBL32Q3A01FP16PBL8V24 
04B-PBL6403 A-02F03CP64P 1 6PB " 

108 PLAY"L8V20O4FPBO3FPSB-PB" 

1 09 PLAY " V22L3203A-02CP 1 6PBB- A-P 
1 6PBL6403E-02G-A-P64P 1 6PB 5 XF* ; L 
3204A-03A-02D-P32PBA-03D-P 1 6PBL6 
4F02A-03D-P64P 1 6FB " 

1 1 PLAY " L3204A-F0 1 A-P32PBL6402 A 
-D3D-FP64P 1 6PBD4FD2 A-03D-FP 1 6PB 
L3204A-F02E-P32PBL6402A-03CE-P64 
P16PBB-02A-03CG-P16P8 L32Q4A-F01 
A-P32P8L6402A-03E-G-P64P 1 6PB04C0 
2A-03E-G-P16PB" 

1 1 1 PLAY " L3204 A-E-02D-P32PBL6404 
D-02A-03D-FP 1 6P804C02 A-03D-FP 1 6P 
B L3204A-E-02FP32PBL6404D-02A-03 
D-FP16PB02A-03D-FP64P16LBB- L32Q 



4 A-03A-02CP32PBG-A-P 1 6PBL6403E-0 
2G- A-P64P 1 6PB : XF* : " 

1 1 2 PLAY " L3204 A-03 A-0 1 BP32PBL640 
2FA-03E-P64P 1 6P8F02FA-03E-P 1 6PB 
L3204F0 1 B-P 1 6P8L6402F A-03DP64P 1 6 
P802FA-03DP64P16P8 L3204F02E-P 1 6 
P803D-GP 1 6PBL64B-D-BP64P 1 6P8 L40 
4E-L3203D-G-P 1 6P8L64AD-G-P64P 1 6P 
B M 

1 1 3 PLAY " L6402A-LB04E-T5P64P32P 1 
6L6403CG-L8A-P32P 1 6T3V24LB04DPB 
T2L4FE-T 1 L2V2904A-P8 " 

114 PLAY"V1B" 

1 1 5 FORX- 1 TD4 : PLAY " V+T603LBA-B-A 
-B-A-B-"!NEXTX 

116 PLAY"V22LB03BA-04C03B-GA-04C 
V2603B-GA-04C03B-GA-04C03B-GA-V2 
B04C03B-GA-04C03B-" : A-0: G0TDB7 

1 1 7 PLAY " V30T5L24O5E-O 1 G-L 1 205D- 
C04B-L6403D-E-B-L 1 2V2605A-G-FE-D 
-C04B-A-G-FE-V22T4D-C03B-T3L64A0 
1 AP32PBL 1 604CP8L6403B-02G-A-P64P 
1 6T2L8V2503FL6402G-A-LB . 036-L4V2 
BCL32T2V30D 1 V2BD-L2D3D- " 

1 1 B FORX- 1 TO 1 5 : PLAY "LI 2502F A-03F 
"sNEXTX 

119 FORX-1TO900: NEXTX 

120 COLORS, 5 

121 F0RX-4T01B4 

122 LINE<6,X>-<250,X> ,PSET 

123 PLAY"L250O5B-B" 

124 NEXTX 

1 25 PLAY " L255 V3 1 1 CC#CC#CC#CC# " 

126 FORX- 1TO400 a NEXTX 

1 27 PLAY "LI 800 1 D-F A-02D-FA-03D-F 
A-04D-F A-05D-F A- " 

128 SCREEN0,0 

129 CLS<0>: FORX- 1TO600S NEXTX 

130 PR I NT* 133," FOR ENCORE PRESS 
<P> "5:PRINTe391,"TO END PRESS < 
Q> "; 

131 PP*-INKEY* 

132 IF PP*-"P" THEN SOTO 1 

133 IF PP*«"Q" THEN SOTO 135 

134 GOTO 131 

135 CLS:PRINT@0,"BYE !":SOUNDl,l 
: END 



^ 




IS^^ttl M RO Wf acI 







136 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



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BYTE MASTER 



I rainbow! 



The One Great Secret 
To Assembly Language 



By R. Bartly Betts 

Rainbow Contributing Editor 

With Programs By Chris Bone 



Last month I said I would use this 
column to provide answers to 
your questions and cut down on 
my correspondence load. It isn't work- 
ing; I am only getting more letters! I 
appreciate hearing from you, but ... ah 
well, there are penalties for being 
famous (or infamous). 

In any case, if you don't hear from 
me soon after you write, it may be I 
have a pile of letters to answer before 
I come to yours, or it may be that I 
will try to answer your letter in the 
column, or it may be you didn't provide 
a self-addressed, stamped envelope. I 
haven't refused to answer a letter 
lacking return postage yet, but I may 
have to begin — four or five dollars 
a week can add up. 

Following are the answers to this 
month's questions and comments; 

1) Although no one has actually 
asked, "What is the one great secret of 

(R. Bartly Betts is currently a technical 
writer for Tandy Corp. and is a former 
news reporter and magazine editor. As 
the father of 10 children, computers are 
his escape from reality. 

Chris Bone is a college computer 
science major and has been program- 
ming for more than three years. He 
averages between six and nine hours a 
day on the Co Co.) 



assembly language?", Chris said he feels 
many readers are searching for the 
answer to such a question. I agree with 
him, and so present the following great 
secret: 

There is no secret to assembly 
language. Proficiency comes 
through hard work. If you apply 
yourself for several hours a day, 
you can probably be an adequate 
programmer in a year's time. In 
three to five years you can prob- 
ably be a good programmer and 
begin to compete with some of the 
better software authors. 

This column will not make you 
into a good programmer, no 
matter how long it continues. Its 
purpose is to get you started and 
over the rough spots. 

Now that I have said that, let 
me encourage you a bit. It does 
not take a year to become familiar 
with assembly language; a few 
weeks will do. It does not take 
a year to learn to enter programs 
another person wrote; a few days 
will do. 

But assembly language pro- 
gramming is a profession and, if 
you want to do it well, you must 
work at it in the same manner as 
any other profession. 



2) I have received a letter from Shawn 
Jack. If you remember, he was one of 
the programmers who sent in an answer 
to the initial "Byte Master" challenge 
of changing 'A's to asterisks. It seems 
I misread his address; he lives in 
Goreville, Illinois, not Ooreville. 

3) I have received several requests for 
back copies of my articles. I am afraid 
it is a request I cannot fill. The first 
time T was asked, my reaction was, "why 
not?" Then I realized that doing so is 
probably illegal. While I have copies 
of my articles, they have been sold to 
THE RAINBOW and I have no more right 
to copy and distribute them than 
anyone else. 

I also do not have time. It would 
probably take a couple of hours to make 
copies of all my articles. If 10 people 
asked me for copies, that is 20 hours. 
My wife and family can think of lots 
of other things for me to do with 20 
hours. 

4) T also received a request for an 
"editor/ assembler." This is a software 
product that is sold by Radio Shack 
and other companies. There are several 
editor/ assembler packages on the 
market, but I am afraid I know of none 
that are available as "public domain" 
packages (programs available to anyone 
free of charge). 

If you do not have an editor/ 



138 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



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assembler and do not have the money 
to buy one, the best I can offer is the 
basic program from last month's 
article, and/ or a monitor program from 
past issues of THE RAINBOW. I gave 
some pointers for using these methods 
in the last column. 

5) As far as I know, the 51-column 
Bytescreen program will work with any 
Color Computer configuration. I have 
heard from readers who have used it 
on nearly all versions of computers, 
ROMs and accessories. If you have 
problems, let us know and we will either 
fix them or at least warn others. 

6) Chris and I are extremely interested 
in any upgrades you make to the 
Bytescreen program. Chris is working 
on several upgrades to the program. If 
you have made, or do make improve- 
ments you would like to share with 
other readers, please submit them. We 
have already received one upgrade that, 
if the author is willing, will be included 
in the next column. I think it would 
be great to continue this until we 
develop a super program. 

7) There do seem to be problems with 
the Find program introduced by this 
column. It doesn't seem to work on all 



BASIC programs. If Chris or I ever get 
time, we will try to fix it. It seems to 
crash only after it has done its job, so 
perhaps it still helps. 

Assembly Help 

Last month's column mainly dealt 
with how to translate source code 
listings into machine language. Because 
of the trouble many readers seem to 
be having, I have decided to give equal 
time to those of you with editor/ 
assemblers. I will try to not repeat what 
has already been said in previous 
columns, but expand on it to help those 
who are still having trouble. 

The difficulties seem to be in the area 
of assembling, after listings have been 
typed, and knowing where to put in- 
memory assemblies. The information in 
this column will deal with the ED- 
TASM+ program. This is for two 
reasons: EDTASM+ is what I use and, 
judging from the questions and letters 
I receive, it is what you are using. So 
far, I have not heard from anyone using 
another assembler. 

Those Bad 'Bad' Errors 

As you know from reading your 



manual, the cartridge version of ED- 
TASM+ resides between memory loca- 
tion $C000 and $DFFF. If you have 
a 16K computer, you have RAM 
memory from $600 to $3FFF for your 
program storage. If you have a 32K 
computer, you have RAM memory 
from $600 to $7FFF for storage. 

However, in order to keep track of 
variables and labels, EDTASM+ must 
use some of that memory. First, it 
reserves $200 bytes for variables buffers 
and stacks at the bottom of the available 
memory. Second, as you write programs, 
the edit buffer grows from the bottom 
of the memory upward. Third, storage 
space is allocated for all symbols in your 
program and their corresponding 
values. 

As you can see, writing programs 
causes allocated memory to expand 
upward, decreasing the room you have 
available for in-memory assemblies. 
Depending on the RAM size of your 
computer, you can enter programs 
which use so much of that RAM, there 
is not sufficient room to assemble the 
program in memory. When this 
happens, you get the familiar "bad 
memory" error message. I have had 



\ 



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140 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



numerous complaints about this 
problem. 

How can you tell if you have enough 
room to assemble a program in memory? 
Well, the easiest way is to try assembling 
it without an ORG line. This causes 
EDTASM+ to begin assembling the 
program at the first available memory 
location. If you get a "bad memory" 
error with this procedure, there simply 
is not room. 

When there is not room, or you must 
assemble a program in an area that is 
already used by EDTASM+, an alter- 
native is to assemble the program to 
tape or disk. Exit EDTASM+ and load 
the program using CLOADM and EXEC. 
However, be sure you save the source 
listing before doing this, then if it 
doesn't work the first time, you will not 
have to type the listing again. 

It's Worse with Disk 

If you have the disk version of 
EDTASM+, everything operates in the 
same manner as previously described 
except EDTASM+ is not resident 
between $C000 and $DFFF. In fact, it 
is resident in your RAM and this poses 
a special problem. You now have much 
less free RAM for buffers and storage. 
You are even more likely to get the "bad 
memory" error. You are sacrificing a 
great deal of memory for the advantage 
of disk speed. 

There is little you can do to overcome 
the "bad memory" error other than 
what I have suggested. If you have a 
16K computer, you can upgrade to 32K. 
You can also hope someone will write 
a 64K editor/ assembler for those of us 
who have fully upgraded machines. 

If you must assemble programs in 
EDTASM+'s buffer and stack area, 
EDTASM+ provides a "MO" (manual 
origin) switch you can use to change 
the location of the buffer and the 
normal beginning of in-memory assem- 
blies. This switch is described in the 
EDTASM+ manual with step-by-step 
instructions. 

While this process lets you change 
the automatic ORG location, it does not 
add more room for assemblies. If you 
were out of room before, you will be 
out of room after implementing MO. 

The Assembly 

The other most common problem 
seems to be with the assembly process 
itself. For that reason I have written 
a simple program (Listing 1), and will 
go through the entire typing, checking, 



saving and executing process. 

If you are familiar with all of this, 
have patience with those who are not. 
After hearing the trouble others were 
having, I went through the books I have 
and found there is no one place that 
explains the process. I also remember 
having similar problems when I first 
began. 



A prompt asks you for the filename; 
type REVER and ENTER. You are promp- 
ted to ready the tape recorder. Insert 
a tape, position it where you want, press 
the Play and Record keys, then press 

ENTER. 

To save the listing on disk, type W 
REVER and ENTER. You have now saved 
the source code and can safely attempt 



!ii!TE/i... 



OflCOT 



ORG 



00110 

00120 
00130 
00140 
00150 
00160 
.00170 
00180 



liliiil^ire^ti - moo.. *beginning of. text screen. memory 

I^B^^^^^^^^^^B^^r WITH : VALUE AT- ■ X ■ ■ 
^lf£^^^ ■ OR A . : ■ ■ ■ . . . 

mmg^mmmi!Xm^mm- *ExcimrvE.oR b ■■■■ 



STD 

■ CMPX ; 









lENi) 



The purpose of this program is to 
reverse everything on the text screen. 
It does this by loading Register X with 
the beginning location of the text 
screen. The value pointed to by 'X' is 
then loaded into Register D (registers 
A and B). An exclusive DR operation 
is performed on registers A and B, then 
Register D is stored back into the screen 
location pointed to by 'X.' Register X 
is incremented, and this process is 
continued until the end of the screen 
is reached at S5FF. 

To type in the program, load ED- 
TASM+; either plug in your ROM pack 
or load the program from diskette. 
When EDTASM+ is operating, press 
190 ENTER. The first line number 90 
appears on the left of the screen. 
Because there is no label in the first 
column of this line, press the right- 
arrow key to skip one column to the 
right. Now type ORG and press the right 
arrow again and type $E00 ENTER. 

Notice that you do not need to type 
the comments (text that follows an 
asterisk). The comments are for your 
instruction only and have nothing to 
do with the operation of the assembler. 

When you press enter, the cursor 
drops to the next screen line. Now type 
the label name 5TRRT and press the 
right arrow. Type each column text and 
data as you did for Line 1 . 

After all of the lines are typed in, 
you are ready to assemble the program. 
However, it is a good idea to first make 
sure that if something goes wrong, you 
do not have to type in the program 
again. To do this, save the listing you 
have typed to disk or tape. 

To save it to tape, type W and ENTER. 



other processes without fear of losing 
what you have typed. 

Program Checking 

You may wish to check the program 
before you assemble the listing to tape 
or disk. You can do this by assembling 
it in memory. The ORG line of the listing 
directs the assembly to $E00. To 
assemble the program in memory, type 
R/IM/WE. The C A' is the command to 
assemble a listing, "IM" is a switch 
telling the assembler to assemble the 
listing in memory, and "WE" is a switch 
telling the assembler to stop if it 
encounters an error. 

Assembly in memory tells you if there 
are any errors in the program that are 
incompatible with EDTASM+; it puts 
the program where it is meant to reside 
and from where you can give it a trial 
run. If any errors are encountered, the 
program stops after printing the offend- 
ing line. 

It also tells you what the error is so 
you can correct it. To correct a line, 
type E followed immediately by the line 
number, for instance E120 (you do not 
need to include the preceding zeros in 
a line number). You can then space 
through the line with the space bar and 
use the normal Extended BASIC editing 
commands to fix the error and attempt 
another assembly. 

When the listing is correct, the 
assembler lists the entire assembly to 
the screen, ending with a display 
indicating zero errors and the names 
of the labels used in the listing. 

Zooming in ZBUG 

You can now do further checks on 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 141 



your program by using your editor/ 
assembler's ZBUG features. To enter 
ZBUG, type Z and ENTER. 

One way to try out the program is 
to type GSTRRT and ENTER. The 'G' is 
a command telling ZBUG to execute 
a program. "START" is the label 
indicating the beginning line of your 
program and where to begin execution. 
If all works, the screen will be reversed 
in a twinkling of an eye. 

If the program crashes or doesn't 
work properly, you can sometimes 
recover it by pressing BREAK or the 
Reset button. If neither of these actions 
bring EDTASM+ back, you will have 
to shut the computer off and reload 
EDTASM+, then reload the listing you 
have saved. 

You reenter the edit mode from 
ZBUG by typing E and ENTER. If you 
had a total crash, reload EDTASM+ 
and then reload your listing by typing 
L ENTER REVER ENTER for the tape 
version, or L "REVER ENTER for the disk 
version. You must now find the mistake 
and correct it before attemping execu- 
tion again. 

If you are having problems, you can 
also try your program from ZBUG by 



single stepping. To begin single stepping, 
type STfiRT, (that's STRRT followed by 
a comma). You execute each subsequent 
line by pressing the comma. Each line 
of the program is displayed on the 
screen before it is executed and, when 
a crash occurs, you can see exactly 
where it happens. You can enter other 
commands (such as R) to examine the 
registers between steps. 

Note that START is used to point 
to the beginning of the assembled 
program. Other listings may have 
another label to indicate their beginning 
or no label at all. If there is no beginning 
label, you must use the beginning 
address of the program, such as GEOO. 



Making Progress 

I realize there are also many of you 
who would like more "meat" in these 
columns. I promise to delve deeper in 
future columns. For now, I am trying 
to cover the bases for the beginners who 
are confused. Soon I hope we can all 
move forward together. 

For those of you who do not have 
an editor/ assembler, I am including the 
following listing of the previous program 
with the machine language code. I 
didn't include it earlier because I didn't 
wish to confuse anyone. Last month I 
explained how to enter machine lan- 
guage code. If you have forgotten, refer 
to last month's column. 



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: $E0O ' -^PROGRAM. ASSEMBLY -LOCATION 

#$400 - : ^BEGINNING OF TEXT ] SCREEN MEMORY: 
' »X ' . ':'*L0AD; D WITH VALUE AT ' X 
:' #64; ': .- ^EXCLUSIVE "OR A . ' 

im ^EXCLUSIVE OR B . 

,X++ *ST0RE D INTO LOCATION AT X 
;-■ , .#$600 '.■■■ *CHECK FOR END OF TEXT , SCREEN 

LOOP* IF NOT END* DO AGAIN 

■ '^-*wv> \ Program : \ , 



MM® TOTAL /ERRORS^ 



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KEY-264K allows full communication between sides plus the ability to switch back and forth at will, all from 
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FOREGROUND/BACKGROUND MULTI-TASKING mode. Don't buy that printer buffer yet! With the KEY-264K you can be 
printing in the background side while utilizing your computer normally in the foreground side AT THE SAME TIME!!! 
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For DISK users, the KEY-264K allows you to alternate between DISK and EXTENDED BASIC on the same side with 
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142 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 




i^ssssjffi 



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So what's so new in our second generation'? We 
had a lot of requests for the need to use the lessor 
i expensive 28 pin Eprorns. Our 2nd generation 
; controller allows the useage of either (two 24pin 
\ ROMS), or (one ^4pm ROM and one 28pm ROM). 
| The second feature we added was a technical one j 
i and is riot apparent to the average user. Western 
; Digital was good enough to manufacture for us s 
:far advanced drive controller chip, called the | 
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manual $ 40. j 

Parts Kit For Bare Board without 

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NEW ROM 

HDS has licensed the ROM from Radio Shack to be 

able to offer alternative operating systems pre- 

blown ready for installation. The first of what we 

hope to be a wide range of options is ADOS ADOS 

is a product of SpectroSy terns of Miami Florida and 

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ADOS supports 2 drives, 40 track, 6ms trk-to-trk ,__ _ , ,__ J 

drives only, either Single Sided or Double Sided. "" """"""""""'" 

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ADOS/HDS 28 pin ROM $ 40. 

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*> 


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mm ■■<*, Zi ;: -t-& 




\^> ; 


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Keytronics Keyboard KB500 

The Fantastic Keytronic Keyboard is now being 
manufactured only for Hard Drive Specialist. It is 
the only keyboard for the Color Computer known 
on the market that does noT use membrane 
switches The KB500 uses a capacitance foam 
switch. This type of switch will never give keyboard 
bounce and last much longer than all other types. 
The KB500 is also the only keyboard that will fit all 
versions of the color computer weather it is a A, B. 
C. D.E. F, ET,TDP-100,COCOIIA,orCOCOIIB. 
One keyboard fits all with out risk of getting the 
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documentation and a sample program. The Key- 
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was offered through Keytronics. Our price on it is 
only $69. plus S3 for shipping 



HARD DRIVE SPECIALIST 



Ordering Information 

Use our Watts line to place your order Via Visa. MasterCard, or Wire 
Transfer Or Mail you payment directly lo us. Any non-certified funds will 
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Order Line 1-800-231-6671 

16208 Hickory Knoll, 
Houston, Texas 77059 



TURN OF THE SCREW 



How To Follow 
A Memory Map 



By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



I feel like a broken record, but I still 
get a lot of questions and calls about 
memory mapping. Don't feel bad 
— it took me quite a while to get it 
right myself. 

Let's go over it step by step. This time, 
I'll go into some hardware on how to 
memory map something to the CoCo 
*SCS area, which is the area mapped 
at 65344 ($FF40) to 65375 ($FF5F). 
This memory mapping technique will 
work on any version of the CoCo or 
CoCo 2 since the theory is the same. 
In fact, most of this theory will work 
on just about any computer. 

A basic understanding of a CPU is 
a must when trying to understand 
mapping. By now everyone understands 
the importance of binary and Hex 
numbers; it has everything to do with 
mapping. 

Let's start with binary: zero and one. 
That's it. A binary digit has only two 
values, zero and one. Two binary digits 
have four combinations: 00, 01, 10, 11. 
Three digits have eight and so on. Table 
1 shows a four-bit number and the 

(Tony DiStefano is well-known as an 
early specialist in computer hardware 
projects. He lives in Laval Guest, 
Quebec.) 



relation between decimal numbers, Hex 
numbers and binary. 

Table 1 



Decimal 


Hex 


Binary 








1111 


1 


1 


0001 


2 


2 


0010 


3 


3 


0011 


4 


4 


0100 


5 


5 


0101 


6 


6 


0110 


7 


7 


0111 


8 


8 


1000 


9 


9 


1001 


10 


A 


1010 


11 


B 


1011 


12 


C 


1100 


13 


D 


1101 


14 


E 


1110 


15 


F 


mi 



As you can see, a number from zero 
to 15 in decimal can be represented by 
one character from '0' to 'F' which is 
four binary bits. This is called a nibble. 
Now, a number from zero to 255 in 
decimal can be represented in Hex from 



'0' to "FF'\ This is called a byte. In 
binary, a byte takes up eight bits or 
two nibbles. The 6809 CPU (the CPU 
in the CoCo) has a data bus of eight 
bits, better known as an eight-bit CPU. 
(The internal structure is 16-bit, but I'll 
get into that story another day.) 

Back to our nibble. This nibble 
represents 16 different combinations or 
discrete locations. Each different loca- 
tion becomes one memory location and 
each memory location has its own 
discrete address. 

Address (0000 in binary) is the first 
memory location (zero is a valid 
number). Address 1 (0001 in binary) is 
the second. But, that is only four bits; 
the 6809 has 16 bits used for memory 
locations which is a 16-bit address bus. 
Sixteen address lines means the CPU 
can access 65536 different locations. 
The first location is "0000000000000000" 
and the last location is "11111111 
11111111," with 65534 combinations in 
between. For example, "10101000 
01 101010" is a valid location. 

Writing out 16 zeros and ones every 
time we want to mention an address 
is silly. If we go back to our nibble, 
it can be represented by a single 
character. Sixteen bits would be four 
nibbles. Each nibble represents one- 



144 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



fourth of the 16-bit address. So, going 
back to our first location, we can now 
write it as a four-digit number, $0000. 

The T in front of the number means 
the number to follow is in Hex; it can 
also be represented by the letter 'h' at 
the end of the number. The last location 
would now be SFFFF, and a number 
somewhere in between would be 
SCD8A. 

That is the basic memory map of a 
CPU. Let's go back to our nibble for 
now — it is a little easier to work with. 
Tf we were to spread out each of the 
16 locations into individual outputs, 
there would be 16 of them. 

Most computer peripheral devices 
such as PIAs and VDGs require that 
a logical zero be used to select that 
particular device. That means if you 
have several devices connected to the 
same computer and want to select one 
at a time, all the select lines would be 
at logical one, except the peripheral that 
is to be selected. If we were to map 
out our four-bit address to one of 16, 
the result would look like the results 
in Table 2. 

Table 2 



Binary 


One of 16 


Number 


Select Lines 


0000 


1111111111111110 


0001 


1111111111111101 


0010 


1111111111111011 


0011 


1111111111110111 


oioo 


1111111111101111 


0101 


1111111111011111 


0110 


1111111110111111 


0111 


1111111101111111 


1000 


1111111011111111 


1001 


1111110111111111 


1010 


1111101111111111 


1011 


1111011111111111 


1100 


1110111111111111 


1101 


1101111111111111 


1110 


1011111111111111 


mi 


0111111111111111 



In each of the 16 examples, only one 
of the 16 lines is low, therefore only 
one of the possible 16 devices is selected. 
This is known as decoding. Decoding 
means separating a binary input to its 
individual outputs. 

That is only four bits. If we were to 
look at 16 bits (the amount of address 
lines the* 6809 CPU has), the decoded 
output would be one of 65536. Listing 
a table of the outputs would require 



several hundred pages (I think I'll pass 
on that one). 

You can see the amount of compo- 
nents that goes into a chip. The amount 
of individual outputs doubles with 
every addition of one bit. Table 3 shows 
the relation between the amount of 
binary bits to the amount of individual 
select lines possible. 

Table 3 



Number of 


Number of 


Bits 


Select Lines 


1 


2 


2 


4 


3 


8 


4 


16 


5 


32 


6 


64 


7 


128 


8 


256 


9 


512 


10 


1024 


11 


2048 


12 


4096 


13 


8192 


14 


16384 


15 


32768 


16 


65536 



Do the numbers in the right-hand 
column look a bit familiar? They 
should: IK, 2K, 4K, 8K, 16K, 32K and 
64K. These are the real values people 
talk about when they say "K's." When 
you say your computer has "16K," it 
really has 16384 bytes of memory; 16K 
is just a rounded off number for the 
real thing. 

OK, we now understand how a CPU 
can access all those bytes of memory. 
"How come I can't see thousands of 
wires and chip selects in my computer?" 
would be the next question. Well, there 
are thousands of wires and chip selects 
in your computer, but most of them 
occur inside the major chips of the 
computer. 

Take, for instance, the Color BASIC 
chip. It is 8K, or 8192 bytes long. This 
is a good place to start. If you look 
back to Table 3, it takes 13 address lines 
(lines A0 through A 12) to make up 8K 
of memory. The chip used for Color 
BASIC has 13 address lines. They 
connect to the first 13 address lines of 
the computer. That leaves us with a 
balance of three lines. 

A typical Chip Enable line on a 
memory chip activates the whole chip. 
When *CE is activated, it works in 
conjunction with the other 13 lines. It 



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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 



145 



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is sort of a master select. The computer 
tells the chip that I want a byte of data. 
The other 13 lines tell the chip which 
of the 8192 bytes of data it wants. 

Now, look back at Table 2. For the 
sake of theory, take the Color BASIC 
chip. Connect the first 13 lines (least 
significant) to the CPU. You are left 
with three unused lines (most signifi- 
cant). Look at the first three bits in 
Table 2. If you apply that theory to 
this situation, three bits can select eight 
devices. 

Consider the Color BASIC chip as a 
device and connect one of the output 
lines of the three to eight decoders. A 
decoder such as this does exist; it has 
three inputs and has eight output lines. 
It also has other control lines, but we'll 
look into that a little later in this article. 
Connect the three binary input lines to 
the last three free address lines of the 
CPU. Depending on which output line 
we usej the CPU will select the Color 
BASIC chip on one of eight 8K borders. 

If we put the chip on the first line, 
the CPU will activate the chip from 
memory location 0000 to 8191. If the 
chip was hooked up to the second, it 
then would see the chip as being from 
8192 to 16383, the third would be from 
16384 to 24576 and so on and so on, 
increasing by 8K every time, until we 
reach 64K. This is knowti as memory 
mapping. What we have done is memory 
mapped an 8K chip to the CPU. Again, 
where this 8K is depends on what 
output line of our decoder we use. 



We have used all of the address lines 
in this situation. There are times when 
not all of the lines need to be used. 
When memory mapping a device to a 
CPU and not all the address lines are 
used, a condition called memory "ghost- 
ing" or "mirroring" is formed. 

Memory mirroring is produced when 
the same chip is activated in two or 
more areas of memory. The best way 
to explain this is to use an example. 
Take the previous example of the 8K 
Color BASIC chip. The chip itself has 
13 address lines connected to the CPU 
and the remaining three (most signif- 
icant) lines of the CPU are decoded to 
one of eight. That leaves no address line 
free or unused. If we were to use a 4K 
chip instead of the 8K, there would be 
one less address line. Table 3 reveals 
that. 

Now, leave this address line free and 
not connected to anything. When the 
CPU reads the first 4K of the chip (the 
only 4K in this case) all is fine, but when 
the CPU reads the next 4K, the 13th 
address line will change state. Since it 
is not connected to anything, the CPU 
will read the same thing as the first 4K. 
That is because the only address line 
that changed for the second 4K of 
memory is that free address line. 

Let's take this one further and use 
a 2K chip. Now we have two free 
address lines. The CPU will see the same 
repeated data every 2K for the duration 
of the 8K bank. Bank is a word used 
to describe an area of memory. It is 



INPUT 
SELECTS ' 



A 



ENABLE 



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-OUTPUTS 



74LS138 



146 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



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hot any particular size, but referred to 
as an 8K bank or a 2K bank, whatever 
the size in question is. 

It is not wrong to leave free lines when 
memory mapping, but it does make for 
inefficient Use of memory. Take for 
instance the Disk Extended Color 
BASIC from Radio Shack. The chip 
itself is only 8K long, but is mirrored 
twice into 16K. It still works but renders 
the other 8K of memory unusable 
without more hardware to decode the 
free lines. This, however, does make for 
a less expensive parts count. 

Now to get down to hardware. The 
area most frequently used by CoCo 
hardware hackers is *SCS: Spare Chip 
Select. It is already partially decoded 
by the SAM chip. It is sort of a mini 
"Master Select. "The SAM chip decodes 
this area to be from 65344 ($FF40) to 
65375 ($FF5F). It is only 32 bytes long, 
therefore also requires five address 
lines. These are A0 to A4. So the *SCS 
(Master Select), along with five address 
lines, makes up the 32 bytes of the 
memory map. 

This area is great for I/O purposes 
such as the projects I presented in this 
column*. Take, for example, my article 
"Lights! Camera! CoCo!" (December 
1984, Page 24). It uses the *SCS pin. 



This is just the sort of thing I am talking 
about. I used just the *SCS pin and 
none of the other address lines. That 
means the chip I used is memory 
mirrored throughout the 32 bytes (five 
address lines) and is only one byte wide. 
I saved adding some chips, but in this 
case, I didn't need the rest of the area. 



Now, if we take the three to eight 
decoder I mentioned earlier, and 
integrate it into the *SCS circuit, we 
could access more chips. Figure 4A 
shows the functions of a chip called the 
74LS 1 28. This is a computer compatible 
chip that works well with the CoCo. 
In fact, there is already one of these 
chips inside the CoCo. If you have a 
schematic for the CoCo, look it up. 

Figure 4B shows the Truth Table for 
this chip. When you examine this tabic, 
you will notice the similarity between 
this and Table 1, only it is only three 
bits wide. There is a four to 16 decoder 
chip available, called a 74LS154, but 
you'll have to look that one up yourself. 

Now, the diagram in Figure 5 shows 
how this chip can be hooked up to the 
CoCo and the *SCS pin. This is hooked 
up as such: You have eight separate chip 
enables from 65344 ($FF40) to 65351 
($FF47) and it is memory mirrored four 
times to make a total of 32 bytes. If 
we were to replace AO with A 1, Al with 
A2, A3 with A4 and left AO not 
connected, we would have every second 
byte memory mirrored. If we moved the 
address lines up one more, it would be 
every four bytes memory mirrored. 

If we added more 74LS 138s, we could 
even have 32 bytes not mirrored at all. 
It all depends on the decoding technique 
and how many free address lines we 
want. 

I hope all this decoding has helped 
you understand more on how the CoCo 
works. See you next time, and we'll say 
hi to LEDS. ^ 



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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 147 



GAMEM ASTER'S APPRENTICl 



Role Playing Games Are 
Effective Learning Tools 



By George Firedrake and Karl Albrecht 



Lots of young people (and some not-so-young) are 
playing role playing games. Kids who "can't read" 
are reading, understanding and using rule books for 
role playing games — rule books that make a computer 
reference manual seem simple by comparison. Kids who 
"can't do math" are successfully dealing with numerical 
information, probability tables, economics of fantasyland 
and polyhedral dice in ways beyond the ken of most adults. 
Role playing games might be the most powerful learning 
tools existing in our culture, more powerful by far than 



■.'Millions' of people play role playing games. A" role playing game is a game in 
which one or more players create and play characters (adventurers) who live their 
imaginary lives in a specially made game world. The game world is created, managed 
and operated by a GameMaster (GM), referee, or dungeon master (DM). 

Most people who play role playing games use a formal rule system. Some of 
the best known are shown below. 

Bushido. Fantasy Games Unlimited* P.O. Box 182, Roslyn, NY 11576. 

Dungeons & Dragons (DAD), TSR } P.O.Box 756. Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 
RuneQuestfRQ) Avalon Hill, 4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214. 

Tunnels & Troth (T&T) Blade, P.O. Box 1467, Seottsdale,AZ 85252- 

Beginners beware! The rule books are formidable. If you are a beginner, we 
suggest you start with one of the following books, both from Resion Publishing 

Adventurer's Handbook: A Guide to Role Playing Games by Bob Albrecht 
and Greg Stafford. 

You will also need Adventurer's Handbook if you play our play-by-mail 
beginner's game. We call it Dragon Fun. 

Copyright® 1985 by BragonQuest. P.O.Box 7627, Menlo Park, CA 94026; 



computers. Yet this incredible world of learning is virtually 
ignored by the educational establishment. 

Role playing games can include anything possible in real 
life plus anything anyone can imagine. Perhaps the kids 
who create, explore and manage these "worlds of if" will 
be the creative managers, explorers, movers and shakers 
a few years from now. 

Fortunately, everyone has the number one ingredient 
required to play a role playing game: imagination. Add 
paper and pencil, a few dice, a rule book or two, and 
you are ready to play. We will help. In "GameMaster's 
Apprentice," we will try to answer questions such as: 

— What are role playing games? 

— Why are they so popular? 

— What are the most popular games? 

— How are the games played? 

What can be learned while playing? 

— What can be learned while preparing to play? 

— Parent: How can I use knowledge about role playing 
games to relate better to my children? 

— Teacher: How can I use knowledge of role playing 
games to relate better to my students? 

Most role playing game players play one or more games 
from the following categories: 

— Low-technology worlds where magic works. The 
culture is similar to medieval Earth plus magic that 
works. These are the worlds of swords and sorcery. 



148 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



Arthur and Merlin lived in such a world. Tolkien 
created this kind of world. Bushido, Dungeons & 
Dragons, Rune Quest and Tunnels & Trolls are in 
this category. 

— Contemporary technology worlds, perhaps with the 
addition of superheroes. Examples are Champions, 
Super World, Marvel Superheroes and Mercenaries 
Si Spies. 

— Future technology worlds. Explore our galaxy, or 
another galaxy, in games such as Star Trek or 
Traveller. 

We know that some of you who read "GameMaster's 
Apprentice" are players. What games do you play? What 
are your favorite games? 

We hope some of you are non-players who want to learn 
more about this incredible subculture. How can we help 
you learn? Would it help if we described a game system 
each time (for example, Dungeons & Dragons)! 

Aloysious Continues on His Journey 

Aloysious is traveling afoot from his village to the town 
of Baldvu on a warm, clear spring day. Here again are 
his characteristics and success percentages for the three 
skills described last time. 



Characteristics 


Skills 


Percent 


STR 


10 


Listen 


45 


CON 


11 


Spot Hidden Item 


25 


SIZ 


10 


Move Quietly 


25 


INT 


12 






POW 


10 






DEX 


12 






CHA 


9 







Last time, Aloysious spotted the hidden deer, but was 
unsuccessful in his attempt to quietly move closer to it. 
The deer bounded away; Aloysious sighed and resumed 
his journey. 

HIDE — Success percentage: 55% 

In a dangerous spot, perhaps Aloysious should hide 
instead of trying to sneak away. His chances of hiding 
are much better than his chances of moving quietly away. 

Success: Roll 55 or less on the percentile dice 
Failure: Roll 56 or more on the percentile dice 

Aloysious hears a boisterous bunch of dwarves coming 
down the path. He hides. We roll 42; they don't see him. 
Whew! 

Or use your CoCo to simulate the percentile roll. 

A digit die (DD) is a 10- or 20-sided die whose faces 
are numbered 0, 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. 

D100 is a percentile roll, with numbers 00 to 99. To 
make, a percentile roll, use one DD (digit die) and roll 
it twice. The first roll is the tens digit; the second roll 
is the ones digit. If you roll a '3' the first time and a 
'7' the second time, the number is 37. 



JUMP — Success percentage: 45% 

Only 45 percent? Yes, we know everyone can jump. In 
this case, Aloysious has a 45 percent chance to jump: 

1) Across a ditch about four meters wide. 

2) Up, up and over something one meter high. 

3) Down from a place four meters high without falling 
and possibly getting hurt. 

If he fails, he falls into the ditch (let's hope it is shallow), 
trips over something and falls on his face, or lands in a 
heap while jumping down. He might get hurt doing this 
and take a few hit points. 

Success: Roll 45 or less on the percentile dice 
Failure: Roll 46 or more on the percentile dice 

You guessed it. Aloysious is still meandering down that 
path through the forest. He comes to a somewhat deep 
and fast-moving stream about eight meters wide. There 
is a large rock showing in the middle of the stream. 
Aloysious doesn't feel like trying to swim across, so he 
tries to jump to the rock. He figures he can cross the stream 
in two jumps. 

Roll the dice: 00, Oops! That's a fumble. Aloysious's 
foot hits the rock and slips off. He bangs his knee, scrapes 
his arm, bounces his chin off the rock and plunges into 
the cold, rushing water. 

The GameMaster solemnly intones "1 D6 hit points." We 
roll 1D6 and get three. His clothing absorbs one point, 
so we mark off two hit points on his character sheet. 

SWIM — Success percentage: 20% 

Aloysious will win no swimming medals. He is reasonably 
adept, however, in at least keeping his head above water. 
He has a 20 percent chance of swimming directly across 
the creek with only a little downstream drift. 

Success: Roll 20 or less on the percentile dice 
Failure: Roll 21 or more on the percentile dice 

Like it or not, Aloysious has gone swimming. As he 
strikes out for the other side of the creek, we roll the dice 
and get 33. Looks like Aloysious will have to go with the 
flow. 

A couple of hundred meters downstream, the creek 
deposits a watersoaked, bruised and exhausted Aloysious 
on (fortunately!) the far shore. Gratefully, he rests and 
dries out in the warm sunshine. 

Again we leave Aloysious to dry out, rest and recover. 
Next time, he will continue his trek to Baldvu. 

Play-By-Mail Games 

If you have never played a role playing game and want 
to begin playing, try a play-by-mail (PBM) game. Anyone 
can learn to play by playing — no previous gaming 
experience is required. 

Flying Buffalo, Inc. created the play-by-mail industry. 
We have played or are playing four of their games: Nuclear 
Destruction, Heroic Fantasy, Starweb and Feudal Lords. 
If you are a beginner, try Nuclear Destruction or Heroic 
Fantasy for starters. As you gain experience, move on to 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 149 



Starweb and Feudal Lords. Begin by getting the rules from 
Flying Buffalo, Inc., Dept. GMA, P.O. Box 1467, 
Scottsdale, AZ 85252-1467. Here are the prices: Nuclear 
Destruction $.25, Starweb $2, Heroic Fantasy $1 and 
Feudal Lords $1. There is a set-up fee to enter a game 
and a turn fee each time you send in a move. It's all there 
in the rules. 

Heroic Fantasy 

We are playing Heroic Fantasy by mail and began 
reporting our progress in the January 1985 issue of THE 
RAINBOW. Here is our team of adventurers. 



Name 



Sex Code Kindred Class* STR CON Cost 



Ai Khong 


M 


H 


Hobbit 


F 


5 


15 


5 


Frona 


F 


H 


Hobbit 


F 


5 


15 


5 


Mariko 


F 


H 


Hobbit 


M 


4 


15 


7 


Steffi 


F 


H 


Hobbit 


M 


4 


15 


7 


Sheri 


F 


P 


Human 


F 


15 


30 


9 


Zamora 


M 


P 


Human 


M 


10 


30 


11 


Tindil 


M 


E 


Elf 


F 


25 


25 


15 


Leiko 


F 


E 


Elf 


M 


20 


25 


18 


Jonjari 


M 


D 


Dwarf 


F 


30 


40 


23 


TOTALS 










118 


210 


100 



*Class: F^Fighter, M=Magic-User 

Our characters are now in the Dusty Room. 



Dusty Room 
Doors: North 5, East 25, 
Monster: Brown Bear. 
P204: Potion 



South 3, *West3*. 



KLXCTICEI* 



KLICKER is a tremendous aid for those 
doing much keyboarding such as 
programmers, writers , and businesses. 
Makes your 64K TDP-100, CoCo I or II 
click through the TV speaker upon each 
keystroke. Add it to your programs to 
make typing easier. 

* Very fast ML program 

« Increase typing speed and accuracy 

* Add to disk Telewriter-64(TM) 

* No need to watch the screen 

* Transparent to most BASIC progs 

* Informs you of double hits 

* KLICKER uses all-RAM mode 

* KLICKER is a mod to POLCAT 

* Assembly language listings 

* May be added to other languages 

* 64K and Color BASIC 1.1 or 1.2 

$6 . 00 US Check or money order . 
R.I*, residents please add S% tax. 
TEPCO, 30 Water St. 
Portsmouth, R.I. 02781 



Last time, Ai Khong and Frona picked up two potions 
which turned out to be healing potions. The Brown Bear 
attacked Frona and inflicted eight hit points of damage. 
Her CON is now down to seven. A character called Point 
Man has arrived from the South, wounded with 10 hit 
points. He is character number C214, a male human fighter. 

We have decided to give the following orders. 

— Sheri: X0N. Exit using strength zero through the 
North door, 

— Zamora: T5P204. Take, using strength 5, the potion 
labeled P204. 

— Tindil: G20C57. Guard, using strength 20, character 
C57, who happens to be Zamora. 

— Leiko: X0N. Exit using strength zero through the 
North door. 

— Ai Khong: UP186C214. Use potion P186 (healing) 
on character C214 who is Point Man, apparently from 
another team of adventurers. We are going to be as 
friendly as possible in the game! 

— Frona: UP145 X0N. Use (on herself) healing potion 
PI 45, then exit using strength zero through the North 
door. 

— Mariko: No orders. We are holding her "in reserve." 

— Steffi: X0N. Exit using strength zero through North 
door. 

— Jonjari: X0N, Exit using strength zero through North 
door. 

We filled out an order sheet, adding some things for 
our characters to say, and sent it to Flying Buffalo's 
computer. Here are the results. 

Orders 

X0N 

T5P204: Tindil, guard me as I get 
the potion. 

G20C57: Back off, bear! 
X0N: Our intentions are peaceful. 
UP186C214: You are healed, friend.* 
UP145 X0N: Our aim is to explore. 
: What do I do now? 
X0N: Jonjari, you go first. 
X0N: Respect our peaceful inten- 
tions, or beware! 

♦Character C214 is Point Man, who entered the Dusty 
Room injured. 

Wonder what will happen next. Will the Brown Bear 
attack? What is beyond the North door? 

DragonSmoke and DragonFun 

DragonSmoke is our monthly newsletter about new ways 
to learn, including computers, role playing games, play- 
by-mail games, COPY ME stuff, public domain instructional 
materials, software for beginners, and our own play-by- 
mail game, DragonFun. 

DragonFun is a play-by-mail role playing game for 
beginners. Tt is nonviolent and features cooperation, 
exploration, problem-solving and story-telling. How to play 
is described in DragonSmoke. For a free copy, send a 
business-size, self-addressed envelope with 39 cents postage 
to DragonSmoke, P.O. Box 7627, Menlo Park, CA 94026. 



Character 


ID 


Sheri 


C27 


Zamora 


C57 


Tindil 


C139 


Leiko 


C141 


Ai Khong 


C141 


Frona 


C146 


Mariko 


C153 


Steffi 


C163 


Jonjari 


C191 



150 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



DIGISECTOR 

DS-69 

VIDEO 

DIGITIZER 

FOR THE 

COCO 





Give your COCO the gift of sight! 

The Micro Works is happy to introduce the newest 
member of our Digisector™ family— the DS-69 Video 
Digitizer for your COCO. It has all the standard 
features of its big brothers but comes with a price tag 
that's right for you. 

■ High Resolution 256 by 256 spatial resolution. 

■ Precision 64 levels of grey scale. 

■ SPEED! V2 second for a full screen of video. 

■ Compactness Self contained in a plug in Rompack. 

■ Ease of Use Software on disk will get you up and 

running fast! 

a&^^H The DS_69 Digisector 
opens up a whole new 
.iigp-y !■ world for you and your 
COCO. Your computer 

■'■#■ ilBftrfJJr % ^ r ^ can be a secur ity system, 
TSS^^ii 9 take portraits, analyze 
^ : WjM^K^^^ signatures, inspect 
m assembly work . . . 

the DS-69 is your COCO's 
eyes. Use the DS-69 and a TV camera to get fast, 
precise conversion of video signals into digital data. 

Powerful C-SEE™ software. 

C-See is a menu-driven software package included 
with your DS-69. It provides high speed 5 level digitiz- 
ing to the screen, high precision 16 level digitizing for 
superb hard copy printout, and simple software con- 
trol of brightness and contrast. Or call our driver rou- 
tines from your own Basic 
program for easy 64 level 
random access digitizing. 

Pictures taken by the 

DS-69 may be saved on Wf^M W*k 

disk by C-See and then wlmT^fJ)^ 

edited by our optional K-j" 

MAGIGRAPH package for ¥4\ 
enhancements and mm 

special effects. 

The DS-69 comes with a one year warranty. C-See 
supports both cassette and disk operation with the 
Multi-Pak adaptor and requires 64K. Cameras and 
other accessories are available from The Micro 
Works. Let your COCO see the World! 

■ DS-69 Digisector & C-See Software $149.95 

■ MAGIGRAPH Graphics Package on disk $ 39.95 

Terms: Visa, Mastercard, Check or C.O.D. 

Purveyors of Fine Video Digitizers Since 1977. 

,B mo©D§<§> 

XA/ VS/ U\^LS^^J Established 1977 

P.O. Box 1 1 10 Del Mar, CA 92014 (619) 942-2400 





WISHING WELL 



16K 
ECB 



RAINBOW | | 



The World's 
Easiest Database 



By Fred B. Scerbo 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



(Editor's Note: If you have an idea for the "Wishing Well, " 
submit it to Fred, c/o THE RAINBOW. Remember, keep 
your ideas specific, hut don't forget that this is BASIC. Sorry, 
no personal responses are possible. All programs resulting 
from your ideas are for your use, but remain the property 
of the author.) 



This month's listing will be short and simple, but will 
have many uses for both home and school. I am 
sure many of you have seen listings for database 
programs many times in the past. Quite often, you will 
find ads for database programs that will require 64K and 
a disk drive. Too often, you must read pages and pages 
of instructions just to get your feet wet. Well, for those 
who thought using a database was only for the advanced 
programmer or user, we now have MiniData, a simple 
and short BASIC database that even a child could use. 

The Wish 

You have probably seen me mention that many readers 
and friends have always approached me or others with 
a very basic misconception about what a computer can 
do. How many times have I said that someone has made 

(Fred Scerbo is a special needs instructor for the North 
Adams Public Schools. He holds a master's in 
education and published some of the first software 
available for the Color Computer through his 
software firm, Illustrated Memory Banks.) 



a remark like, "1 want to get a computer so I can dump 
all this information into it and then pull it out when I 
need it!" Some people really think a computer is a device 
which you can reason with in English by telling it, "Give 
me the names of all my friends who own Beta VCRs" 
or "How much money did I make in overtime in the last 
two weeks?" 

Granted, a computer can answer those questions, but 
only if a program has been devised to arrive at those 
answers, provided it is given accurate information by the 
user. Too often, a person will buy a computer to keep 
track of something only to find the software available will 
not do that. 

Radio Shack does have a very simple database called 
Personafile which does a nice job of keeping track of items 
under the heading of "subjects" and "tags," but this can 
only be used for the most general type of sorting by title. 
I happen to like Personafile, but unless you have a disk 
drive, you are out of luck. 

Recently, several readers have written requesting a type 
of database which could be used with the MC-10. My first 
reaction was, "You've got to be kidding!" Although I have 
tried to make as many of my programs as possible work 
on the MC-10, this seemed like a little too much of a task 
to handle. 

I started to rethink my position on that request just a 
few months ago. There are some things which cannot be 
done with an MC-10, such as high resolution graphics. 
I have been able to generate some Lo-Res graphics games 
for it, but handling information in a database just did not 
seem to be practical with the type of keyboard the MC- 
10 has. However, since more and more of my mail has 



152 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



been thanking me for not forgetting our little "CoCo Jr.," 
I felt there just might be a way. 

The Challenge 

The final stimulus which led to creation of MiniData 
came from a couple of teachers who teach for our Chapter 
1 Remedial Reading Program at the high school. Both 
Mickey and Jeri come into my Resource Room at least 
once a week with a debugging problem or a small request 
to help them with their Apple He computers. 

Just a few weeks ago, they came to me with a new 
challenge. Since they run a reading program, they have 
obtained a large number of small books for their students 
to read, all at different reading levels. They were both 
looking for a quick way to get a program that would let 
them keep track of titles, but also select them by grade 
level or subject, or some other characteristic by which they 
could identify the book. This was to be nothing complex 
— they just wanted a quick way to keep track of this 
information. 

Naturally, the old MC-10 and CoCo request came to 
mind. You can imagine their surprise when I came back 
with their completed program less than 20 minutes later! 
The most interesting thing about the listing I gave them 
was that it was only about 25 lines long. Even in Applesoft, 
which usually takes many more lines than Microsoft BASIC 
to complete a task, the program was very short/The big 
question is: Would it work? 

Without getting into too great detail, the listing did 
everything they wanted it to do. They could enter book 
titles with subjects and characteristics, then pull any title 
by searching for a given subject or characteristic. 

What made the program so easy to use was that I would 
let them enter the information in DATA statements, which 
can be edited much more easily than a file. (Besides, 
knowing I would probably translate the Apple version to 
our BASIC since the MC-10 does not have disk capability, 
an easy storage media would be needed. Saving the entire 
program with the DATA in it would be much more efficient 
than loading a tape file. MC-10 does not have a tape on 
and off relay as the CoCo does.) 

Seeing how easily the program works on the Apple, I 
had no difficulty translating it to Color BASIC and MC- 
10 BASIC. Naturally, I added a few small frills so as to 
make the program look attractive on your CoCo or MC- 
10 screen. 

I also included the option of making a hard copy to 
the line printer. (Those with the MC-10 will have to change 
the lines with PRINTtt-2, to LPRINT in the few lines that 
it appears, such as lines 350 and 450.) 

The actual CoCo and MC-10 version is only 49 lines 
long, excluding the REM statements. I have deliberately kept 
each line short, usually under two screen lines. This will 
be useful to those of you who wish to type it into the 
MC-10, which does not have a built-in EDIT command. 
(Please, do not suggest that I find a way to add this 
command to the MC-10!) 

How it Works 

Since I have arranged this program to READ from your 
DATA statements, it is necessary to understand what kind 
of infomation the computer will be looking for. The 
program will always search for two "flags." (A flag is a 
string or number which the program will recognize so as 



to branch out of a READing loop before your get an ?OD 
Error.) 

In this case, our flags are the words END and STOP, END 
will tell the program that you have completed a category. 
STOP will tell the program you have READ all the available 
DATA. You will notice that DATA STOP is found in the last 
line of the program, Line 9999. This will ensure that you 
always have at least the final flag in your program. (You 
could use a higher line number, but 9999 sounds good 
enough for now.) 

Therefore, we must construct our DATA lines starting at 
Line 1000. We may put as many as 20 items in any given 
category we create. Any information we place prior to the 
word END will be included in our list for a given category. 

Look at Line 1000 in our program. I have included 
examples using book titles and certain characteristics of 
those books. Our first book is The Cat in the Hat. The 
information I wish to keep on that book includes 
charateristics such as "Kids," "Illustrated" and "Fiction." 

You will also notice that I have added the characteristic 
"All." This is included so you may easily scan through 
all the files you put in the database by searching for All. 

The last piece of information in the DATA line is our 
flag, END. This tells the program that this is all the 
information under the book title or category The Cat in 
the Hat. 

You will notice that the next DATA line includes similar 
information under the book title The Little Train That 
Could. If we were to search for titles based on the 
information found in these DATA lines, then the title which 
is our first piece of DATA would be listed for us. 

Running the Program 

Let's say you type in the program exactly as listed with 
my sample DATA. On running the program, the screen would 
ask: 

WOULD YOU LIKE HARDCOPY? (Y/N) 

Pressing 'Y' would dump the screen contents to your 
line printer, which must be turned on and loaded with 
paper. The next question will be: 

ENTER ITEM TO SEARCH FOR: 

Let's say we wish to search through our DATA for all 
the books which are for Kids. If we enter Kids, then the 
screen will clear and print: 

THIS CATEGORY CONTAINS A MATCH: 

> THE CAT IN THE HAT 

PRESS <I>NFO OR <OONTINUE 

If we press T for info, the screen will then list all the 
information stored for that category or title. The screen 
would then say: 

PRESS <ENTER> FOR MORE 

Pressing enter would cause the program to search for 
the next category or title containing Kids in its information. 

If you press 'C for continue, the program will just list 
the titles and not the information stored. This can be helpful 
if all you want are the titles or categories containing a 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 153 



specific match in the information. If you had continued 
to press only 'C/ the screen would print: 

THE CAT IN THE HAT 

THE LITTLE TRAIN THAT COULD 

GREEN EGGS AND HAM 

ANOTHER SORT (Y/N) ? 

This means the program has found all the matches which 
were saved in this program for Kids. 

Let's say you search for "history." The program would 
search the information and then print 

NO MATCHES FOUND! 

because we had not listed that as information in any case. 
If we searched for non-fiction, you would only get one 
match: 

LIFE EXTENSION 

because it is the only example in our DRTR listing which 
has the category non-fiction. 

You may also search for a given title or category in 
your DRTR. You are not limited to only searching for the 
information stored in a category. Therefore, if you search 
for: 

DUNE 

the computer would find it listed as a title and allow you 
to list the information stored with that category. 

To put it in the simplest terms, remember that your DRTR 
is entered in this fashion: 

1000 DRTR "title or category", 
"info", "info", "info", "ALL", END 

END indicates the end of a category. RLL allows you 
to search through all the information and categories you 
have stored. Remember, the comma (,) is used to separate 
our pieces of information. You may also use more than 
one DRTR line, but always be sure to end a category's 
information with RLL and END. 



One- Liner Cunt est Winner . . . 



Protect is a program which, to a certain extent, 
keeps "nosy people" out of your programs. Just add 
it to the beginning of a program. 

The listing: 

10 A* (2) *CHR* < 126) : A* <3> *CHR# (96 
) s FORX-1TO4B0: Y-RND (2) +1 s PRINTA* 
CY)j:PQKE65314,248sNEXTXsFORL~lT 
0999999s NEXTL 



EI 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry , the author has been sent copies 
of bot h I he Rainbow Book Of Simulations and its comp anion Rainbow 
.Simulations Tape ■..) : 



Many Uses 

Once you understand the format explained, you can use 
Mini Data to keep track of almost anything. One reader 
requested a program to save recipes. MiniData could do 
that. Have your category be the dish (i.e., banana creme 
pie) and in the data, list all the ingredients. Since you have 
20 categories to work with, you could even include the 
instructions in the final lines. This way, you could store 
pages of recipes on tape or disk, and actually dump the 
instructions to paper with a line printer when you need 
it. (No one that I know of cooks with a computer screen 
near the stove.) 

MiniData could be used to keep track of odd jobs 
completed, additional income, valuables and their serial 
numbers, and so on. No disk is needed, although you can 
save on disk just as easily as on tape. Just save the whole 
program, but be sure to use different program names for 
different information listings (such as recipes or income). 

This program should offer many people a simple 
introduction to a database program. I hope with this listing 
its use is explained sufficiently. It just goes to show that 
simplicity can often be the best solution to a programming 
problem. 

Quick Fix 

Several months ago I listed a program called HOM- 
ONYMS which was a limited multiple choice-type quiz 
using only two choices. Some people have found this 
program useful for reviewing material other than 
homonyms. Therefore, for those who wish to use the 
program for math or history or some other subject, here 
are three DATA lines that will replace the word "h oniony m" 
in the title card with the word "practice" so the quiz title 
will appear as PRACTICE QUIZ. Just replace the three 
lines in the original with the three below and you will have 
the newer version. 



150 
39,, 

6,23 

236, 

160 

6, ,2 

,239 

24,, 

170 

6, ,2 

,236 

36,, 



DATA ,239,236,239, ,239,236,2 
231,23 6,2 35, ,239,236,236, ,23 
9,2 36, ,2 28,23 9,2 32, ,239,236, 
,239,236, 

DATA, 2 3 9,236,236, ,239,237,22 
39, 236, 239,, 2 3 9, 2 2 4, 224,, 224 

239,224, 2 



224, ,224,239,224 



239,236, 

DATA, 236, 224, 224, 

16,224,236, ,236,2 

,224, ,228,236,232 

236,236, 



f f 

,236,224, 
3 6 , 2 3 6 , , 2 
, ,236,236 



2 3 



Be sure to save this new version under the title 
PRACTICE after you make any other modifications, such 
as references to homonyms in the PRINT statements. 

Some readers also wrote in regarding an error they believe 
they found in Demon's Defiance, It seems that some 
versions of the CoCo do not recognize the PEEK [339) as 
a joystick location. (My TDP does.) For those who have 
found difficulty using the joystick with Demon, substitute 
this line: 



680 IFPEEI<(65280) 
127 THEN780 
or try: 

GBO PK=PEEKfG52B0 



<> 255 RND PEEK (65280) <C 



: IF Pl< = 254 OR PK=12G THEN 780 



154 



THE RAINBOW Juhe 1985 



Both should work. I chose the location 339 because 
it involves fewer BASIC characters to be read, making 
a faster program. Again, these are not errors. Every now 
and then we find some differences between the Radio 
Shack ROMs. Thanks to all who wrote in on this. 

On Tri-Hang, the space version of Tri- Planetary 



The listing: MINIDflTR 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 
100 




REM*******************#*##«* 



REM* MINI COLOR DATABASE * 
REM* BY FRED B. BCERBO * 
REM* 149 BARBOUR BT. * 
REM* NORTH ADAMS, MA 01247 * 
REM* COPYRIGHT (C) 1983 * 
REM*****************##»###«# 
CLS 

CLEAR500 
FOR I - 1 TO 1 6 J BK*-BK*+CHR* < 8 > +C 



HR* <8) +CHR* <B) +CHR* (8) a NEXTI 

110 PRINTei34,"MINI COLOR DATABA 

SE" 

120 

130 

140 

150 

PY? 

160 

170 

180 

190 

200 



PRINTSi75,"BY" 

PRINTe201,"FRED B. SCERBO" 

PRINTS PRINT 

PRINT" WOULD YOU LIKE HARDCO 

(Y/N) ■ 

X*-INKEY*a I FX*-"" THEN 160 

IFX*-"Y"THEN P-laBOTO200 

IFX*-"N"THEN P-0:GOTO200 

BOTO160 

PR I NT i PRINT" ENTER ITEM T 
SEARCH FORI " 
210 PRINTi PRINT" ->"| 
220 LINE INPUT CT* 
230 DIM T*(20)aM-0 
240 CLS 

250 READ A*aI-iaT*m-A*aIF A*-" 
STOP"THEN520 
260 IF A*-"END"THEN510 
270 IF A*»CT* THEN T*<I)-A*aGQTO 
320 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 



FORI-2TO20 

READ SR*aIF SR*-"END"THEN510 

T* < I ) -SR* : I F SR*-CT* THEN320 

NEXTI Z8OTO250 

IF X*="C"THEN340 

CLS : M- 1 s PR I NT " TH I S CATEGORY 
CONTAINS A MATCH!" 
340 PRINT "> "T*<1> 
350 IF P-l THEN PRINT#-2,TAB<5) T 
*(1) 

360 PRINT 

370 PRINT"*— PRESS < I >NFO OR <C> 
QNTINUE— "a 



Hangmenoids, those wishing to use the easy level may 
find it convenient to EDIT Line 1200 and insert: 

1200 DL=7: 

just before the IF-THEN statement. This seems to be a 
better place to put it. 

380 X*-INKEY*aIFX*«""THEN3B0 

390 IF X*-"C"THEN300 

400 IF X*-"I"THEN420 

410 G0T038B 

420 FOR Z-I+l TO 20:READ A*a IF A 

*-"END"THEN440 

430 T*<Z)-A*aNEXTZ 

440 FOR K-l TO Z-li PRINT T*<K> 

450 IF P-l THEN PRINT#-2,TABU0) 

T*<K> 

460 NEXTK 

470 PRINT"— --PRESS < ENTER > FOR 

MORE——" 
480 X*-INKEY*a IFX*< >CHR* (13) THEN 
480 

490 GOTO510 
500 PRINTBK*j 
510 GOTO250 

520 IF M-0 THEN CLS a PR I NTS 135, "N 
O MATCHES FOUND ! " 
530 PR I NT a PR I NT " ANOTHER SO 
RT <Y/N) ?" 

540 X*-INKEY*aIFX*-""THEN540 
550 IF X*-"Y"THEN RUN 
560 IF Xt-'-N-'THEN CLSaEND 
570 GOTO540 

990 REM ENTER DATA AT LINE 1000 
1000 DATA "THE CAT IN THE HAT"," 
KIDS" , " ILLUSTRATED" , "FICTION" , "A 
LL",END 
1010 DATA "THE LITTLE TRAIN THAT 

COULD" , "KIDS" , "COLOR" , " ILLUSTRA 
TED" , "FICTION" , "ALL" ,END 
1020 DATA "BREEN EG6S AND HAM"," 
KIDS" , "COLOR" , "PAPERBACK" , "FICTI 
ON", "ALL", END 

1030 DATA "RETURN OF THE JEDI"," 
OLDER K I DS " , " COLOR " , " I LLUSTRATED 
", "FICTION" , "ALL" , END 
1040 DATA "STAR WARS", "OLDER KID 
S" , "COLOR" , " ILLUSTRATED" , "AVAILA 
BLE ON TAPE", "FICTION", "ALL" ,END 
1050 DATA "TARZAN OF THE APES"," 
OLDER KIDS" , "VIOLENT" , "NON-ILLUS 
TRATED" , "FICTION" , "ALL" ,END 
1060 DATA "DUNE","YOUNB ADULT"," 
DIFFICULT" , "NON- I LLUSTRATED" , "FI 
CTION","ALL",END 

1070 DATA "LIFE EXTENSION" ^'NON- 
FICTION" , "HEALTH" , "ADULT" , "ALL" , 
END 
9999 DATA STOP ^ 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 155 



MoreOnMIDIs 



By Ed Ellers 
Rainbow Technical Writer 



That letter we rah from Gareth Jones 
back in April asking about the Musical 
Instrument Digital Interface system 
seems to have touched a nerve; I've 
gotten a couple of different responses 
to his question. (By some coincidence, 
this is our annual Music Issue. Will 
wonders never cease?) Here they are: 

• The major problem I can see is that 
a special hardware interface has to be 
built. I can only think of two sources 
that can give Gareth all he needs to 
design and build the MIDI interface for 
the CoCo: PAIA Electronics and 
Pblymart, both in Oklahoma City. The 
addresses are: 

PAIA Electronics, Inc. 
P.O. Box 14359 
Oklahoma City, OK 73114 

Polymart 

P.O. Box 20305 

Oklahoma City, OK 73156 

Gareth might also be interested in 
Polyphony magazine, available through 
PAIA. 

Rob Rosenbrock 
Bluffton, IN 



(Ed Ellers, a Hainbow and PCM staff 
member] is a self confessed electronics 
fanatic whose other interests include 
science fiction.) 



• / have waited since 1983 for the 
software and hardware to play my 
Roland JX3P synthesizer from my 
Co Co. I finally got tired of waiting and 
wrote my own software and built the 
interface myself It is simple enough 
that anyone who has the skill to make 
his own RS-232 cable can build it. The 
software was written in C and runs 
under OS-9. 

Naturally, I think I have a very useful 
package for people like Mr. Jones and 
myself, so I am trying to interest a 
distributor, and for that reason I won 't 
go into the details except to say that 
thanks to the speed of the Co Cos 6809 
CPU, the project is 99.44 percent pure 
software. If no one seems willing to buy 
it, I'll make the package available 
somehow to interested computer 
musicians. 

Dave McFadden 
Tulsa, OK 

For those of you whose hands-on 
experience with synthesizers is limited 
to those keyboards you see in the 
department stores, if you have any 
interest at all in making music you 
haven't lived until youVe seen and 
heard what the new digital synthesizers 
can do using MIDI. 

I went to a music store recently and 
heard several MIDI-linked systems in 
action, and it was a real eye-opener. 
The Apple II and Commodore 64 (in 
addition to Yamaha's new CX5M MSX 
computer) can be interfaced to MIDI 
now, and the upcoming Atari ST will 



have a MIDI port, so when someone 
brings out a CoCo-MIDI interface, 
CoCo will be joining some fast company. 



Poor Colors 



• / have an original CoCo with a 'D* 
Board. I have never been able to obtain 
the eight colors the computer is supposed 
to generate. When I first bought the 
computer, I hooked it to an old color 
TV and I thought that was the problem. 
However, I now have it hooked up to 
a monitor with the same results. 

The red is a dark shade of blue, for 
instance, and the magenta is also a 
shade of blue. None of the colors are 
What they should be. I replaced the 
VDG chip, thinking this might be the 
problem, but that did no good at all. 

Herman L. Smith 
Olean, NY 

The problem is probably that the 
computer's master clock is out of 
adjustment. Adjusting it will be a bit 
tricky. First, you'll have to set up your 
TV or monitor for best reception on 
a local station's color bar pattern; the 
standard colors from left to right are 
white, yellow, cyan, green, magenta, red 
and blue. (When a monitor is involved 
you will need to arrange some way of 
feeding a local TV signal into it; a 
VCR's video output is a good source.) 

Next, put up blocks of several colors 
on the CoCo and adjust the trimmer 



156 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



capacitor (C4 on a 'C,' T>' or 4 E* Board) 
to get the correct colors. If you turn 
it too far you will lose all color; just 
turn it back. 



RGB vs. NTSC 



• / know that a monitor will improve 
the quality of displays on the CoCo, 
but how do I make an intelligent 
selection without "overbuying" for the 
capability of my Co Co? 

1) What is the difference between 
RGB and composite video? 

2) Can the Co Co output RGB 
signals? 

3) Is RGB any better than composite, 
display-wise? 

4) Could you explain screen pixels, 
bandwidth and dot pitch? 

5) Would a good color monitor give 
you the same number of characters 
as a monochrome monitor? 

Robert Jobin 
Theodore, AL 

1) Composite video is the term for 
a single signal that contains all the 
necessary information to reproduce a 
picture. RGB is a system that sends 
separate red, green and blue signals to 
the monitor (vertical and horizontal 
sync are often separate as well). 

2) The CoCo was designed from the 
beginning to work with standard TV 
sets, and getting the necessary signals 
out is rather difficult. 

3) RGB does provide much better 
resolution than composite color because 
all the information is transmitted in full. 
Composite color restricts the amount 
of color information transmitted. 

4) Pixels (picture elements) are the 
dots that make up the picture. Band- 
width is a measure of how much 
information can be transmitted through 
the circuit; in monitors, bandwidth 
determines how sharp the picture will 
be. Dot pitch is the distance between 
adjacent dots or stripes on the face of 
a color picture tube; the narrower the 
pitch is, the sharper the resulting picture 
will be. 

5) A really good color monitor with 
a fine dot pitch (like .31 mm) would 
show all the characters that most 
computers (and certainly the CoCo) can 
put out. Most composite color monitors, 
sadly, use the same picture tubes as 
home TV sets and don't have such good 



resolution. One (very expensive) monitor 
that does is Sony's KX-1201HG, which 
sells for around $800. 



Printer Switcheroo 



you can wire switches across the DIP 
switch contacts, but you would have to 
turn the printer off and then back on 
after setting the switches in order for 
the printer to recognize the new settings. 



• Can I modify my Tandy/ Radio 
Shack D MP- 110 printer so lean switch 
select the various print fonts without 
having to send the specific control codes 
from the computer? 

Richard C Buescher 
Madison, Wl 

From the schematic you sent, I don't 
see how, since there aren't any switches 
inside the printer to set up default 
settings. On many printers (like Epson), 



Printer Graphics 

• I have a DM P-l 10 printer and have 
no clue as to where I might find a screen 
dump program. Can you help me? 

Beau Palmer 
Costa Mesa, CA 

Radio Shack's Hi-Res Screen Print 
Program should work fine. 



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Mglllll 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 157 




TAKING BASIC TRAINING 



16K 
ECB 



RAINBOW , 



Getting Better Acquainted 
With The DRAW Statement 



By Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



You should have enjoyed getting 
acquainted with DRRUi last month. 
Rather than making pointless 
boxes (R4D4L4H4) or equally mean- 
ingless diamonds (H4E4F4G4), you 
created useful letters of the alphabet. 

As a follow-up, here is a puzzle for 
you to break the ice. Use the DRRW 
statement to make a square inside of 
a diamond. All units of both the square 
and the diamond must be of the same 
length and the square must touch the 
elements of the diamond. If you plot 
it out on a sheet of paper, you can work 
it out easily enough. If you try it as 
a mental exercise, you are apt to 
discover that several attempts are 
necessary before you succeed. 

There is nothing a beginner can do 
wrong when s/he sits in front of the 
keyboard and bangs away. Even a 
mistake is not detrimental, provided 
something is learned from it. In fact, 
it is the best way to learn. 

If you key in Listing 1, you will see 
that the program is geared to run in 
PMQDE4. For purposes of experimental 
programs, where color is not an over- 

(Joseph Kolar is a free-lance writer and 
programmer dedicated to proselytizing 
for computers in general, and the Co Co 
specifically.) 



riding factor, the finer detail of PM0DE4 
is ideal to observe the work in progress 
as you create. 

A few words concerning Listing 1: 
Lines 20 and 30 place the letters 'A' 
through 'O' on the top screen line. Line 
30 has no instructions to CoCo, such 
as size, color or starting location. CoCo 
reads this line as "keep going," since 
it has no new instructions that supercede 
the ones in Line 20 (S8BM20/70). 

Note that the first letter created by 
Line 30 is T and CoCo locates it right 
after the last letter, 'H,' in Line 20. Can 
you imagine the frustration of picking 
up the horizontal coordinate to deter- 
mine where Line 30 should begin? For 
the heck of it, insert your guess in Line 
30 (BMx,70) after the opening ", where 
'x' is your guess. See how quickly you 
can pick up the location that CoCo has 
reserved to save you the bother. Line 
40 centers the balance of the alphabet 
below the first line. 

Notice these two rows of the alphabet 
have the vertical lines in either red or 
blue. The colors will vary from TV set 
to TV set or monitor. 

Line 50 draws and centers the nu- 
merals on the bottom line. They should 
be in red if the letters of the alphabet 
are in blue or in blue if the letters of 
the alphabet are red. In all three rows 



of text, the horizontal lines will be in 
the buff color of the screen. The 
diagonal lines are a repeating combi- 
nation of red and blue or red and green. 

If you press the Reset button and 
RUN, you may find that the alphabet 
swapped colors with the numerals. If 
they did not, repeat this procedure. 
Sometimes CoCo is cranky and doesn't 
cooperate immediately! 

If you want to make all the lines the 
same color, change the horizontal 
coordinate in Line 50 from 65 to either 
64 or 66. One unit more or less won't 
affect the centering significantly. Now 
RUN, then to get the other color, press 
Reset until CoCo cooperates. 

Look over the letters of the alphabet. 
They were created on a 6 by 4 matrix, 
except for 'I,' 6 M' and 'W,' to be as 
simple as possible. Each letter in the 
listing was separated by a space for your 
convenience. The only letter with 
rounded corners is 'D' to tell it apart 
from 'O." You could round off parts 
of 'A,' 'B,' 'C,' T>,' 4 0,' T,' 'Q,' 'R' or 
'S,' which are customarily cursive, to 
become more elegant. 

The more elegant the alphabet, the 
more troublesome it is to create and 
utilize. The only elegant feature is the 
"tick" mark on numeral '1,' which 
makes it a 6 by 2 matrix;. 



158 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



If you want to make all the vertical 
lines the same color in S8 or S16, use 
either all even or all odd numbers in 
every line that has a horizontal locating 
coordinate (e.g.: Line 20 <21>, Line 
40 <61>, Line 50 <65>). Now, break 
and remove the REM marker from Line 
15 and RUN. 

This sentence uses five additional 
spaces to separate words, BR8, instead 
of the usual BR3 used to separate 
letters. 

You may want to copy lines 200 
through 270, letter by letter, on graph 
paper to get the feel of how each letter 
"flows" from one to the next. The letters 
may connect at the top or the bottom, 
depending where the next letter begins, 
thus avoiding extra moves. 

This is not to say that you should 
not return to the lower left-hand corner 
of the 6 by 4 matrix of the next letter. 
You may find it easier to do so. If so, 
try to recreate the sentence so every 
letter begins in the same spot of the 
matrix (lower left corner). 

Observe Line 280 and BREAK. Now, 
change S8 to S12 and RUN. Both 
verticals of 'A,' 'N' and 'O,' and a small 
vertical of 'B' are the wrong color. We 
want all the vertical lines in "RAIN- 
BOW" to be the same color as the 
sentence. 

Make the following changes in Line 
280; break and change the BR3 at the 
end of 'R'to BR4, then RUN and BREAK. 
Change the BR3 at the end of 'A' to 
BR4, then RUN and BREAK. Change the 
BR3 at end of T to BR4, then RUN and 
BREAK. Change the BR3 at the end of 
'N' to BR4 and RUN. 

The 'B' must be redrawn to eliminate 
the mismatched color in the top part. 
This is a hard one! Again, a compromise 
must be made. Redraw 'B' to read 
U6R3FDGNL3FD2NL4BR4; RUN and 
BREAK. Change BR3 at the end of 'O' 
to BR4 and RUN. Now it is OK! 

Remember, you must make one 
correction at a time and check to see 
where the next correction must be 
made. In the case where one side of 
a letter is one color and the other side 
is in the second color, you may correct 
this by making the letter one unit wider. 
(A 6 by 4 matrix letter is changed to 
a 6 by 5 matrix format.) 

You can BREAK and change S12 back 
to S8 and discover that both sizes have 
become stable. 

For practice, delete Line 280 and 
create your own word using S12 size 
and then adjust it so it will be the same 



color as the sentence. 

We found out some interesting 
things, didn't we? Since we are too new 
at computing to understand or worry 
about "why" something happens, we 
remain content to become familiar with 
"what" happens. Let us experiment 
together to see what we can determine 
about PMDDE4 with SCREEN 1,1. 

This is the sort of experimentation 
you are urged to try. You never know 
what insights you may gain or what 
avenues of exploration may be uncov- 
ered. Hopefully, we will know a bit 
more when we finish this study than 
we know now. 

Type NEW and key in lines 0,10 and 
100 of Listing 2. First, we will draw 
two diagonal lines to cover the screen. 
Key in Line 20 using the DRfiW statement. 



rr This is the sort of 
experimentation you are 
urged to try. You never 
know what insights you 
may gain ..." 

We tell CoCo to draw a line in CI, 
beginning at locations BM0,0, moving 
diagonally down and to the right-hand 
corner (F255); next, to go to the lower 
left-hand corner without drawing a 
visible line, BL255; then draw a line 
diagonally up and to the right-hand 
corner, E255, and RUN. Examine the 
lines. You should see that the lines are 
composed of three different, repeating, 
colored dots. 

Usually these lines are put on the 
screen using the LINE statement. You 
can check this out by putting a REM 
marker in front of DRfiW in Line 20. Key 
in Line 30 without the REN marker and 
RUN. You have exactly the same thing. 
Comparing lines 20 and 30 of the listing 
proves that using DRRW is quicker and 
simpler than using LINE. 

For the record, note that 
DRRW"C1BM0,0F255 is equal to 
LINE(0,0)-(255,131),PSET: and 
BL255 is equivalent to L I NE- ( , 191 ) , 
PRESET: and E255 does the same as 
LINE-(255,0),PSET. 

We decide to check out the vertical 
lines and picking one at random, we 
instruct CoCo to draw a line 50 units 
from the left margin at the top down 
to the bottom. Key in 40 
DRRW"BM50,0D191 and RUN. We get a 
red line. If you get a blue or green line, 



press Reset until it turns red for the 
purpose of our study, then BREAK, add 
BR 1 (same as BR), and draw a line back 
to the top, smack dab next to the first 
line! Did you add U191? Now RUN. 

This results in a nice blue line. Press 
BREAK and move two spaces or units 
to the right and draw a line to the 
bottom of the page, BR2D191, and RUN. 
We get a greenish line; now break and 
move three units to the right and draw 
a line to the top, BR3U191, and RUN. 
Now we get a red line. Hit BREAK and 
let's move four units to the right and 
draw a line to the bottom, BR4D191, 
and RUN. This gives us a green line. 

Continue to move right, incrementing 
"+ 1 " each time and draw an appropriate 
line up or down. Run after each 
addition to Line 40 (refer to the listing). 

When you are finished, can you draw 
some conclusions? When do you get red 
lines? Green lines? How can you change 
the last red line on the right to that 
nice blue color? How about that last 
green line? Hint: At the end of Line 
40, add BL12U191, RUN, BREAK, then 
add BR13D191 and RUN. Did you 
expect that? 

What do you suspect will happen 
when you tell CoCo to begin at either 
49 or 51 units from the left margin? 
Try both and see! Does that tell you 
anything? Suppose you added a third 
line next to the last one (BR1U191), 
then what? You get the idea! Continue 
with these vertical lines until you run 
out of possibilities. 

After your interest is exhausted in the 
vertical lines, let us go back to work 
and check out the horizontal lines. Tell 
CoCo where to begin. Key in 50 
DRAW "BM0 , 80 to start at the left margin 
80 units from the top and draw a line 
to the right margin: R255 and RUN. Aha! 
A buff line. Let us put a line just below 
it and see what happens: BD1L255 and 
RUN. Nothing much! 

Continue with the balance of Line 
50, adding one line at a time, making 
the space between units "+ 1 " wider each 
time (refer to Line 50). When finished, 
what conclusions can you draw? 

In Line 60, we decide to draw a box 
in an unused area of the screen. Key 
in Line 60. We decide to make a larger 
box surrounding the small box. Key in 
Line 70 and RUN. You should have a 
nested pair of boxes with red horizontal 
lines and buff vertical lines. 

Suppose we painted it? Would color 
1 (CI) stop at both the red and buff 
borders? And, what color would we get? 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 159 



Let's paint the area between the big box 
and the small box. Key in Line 80 
without the REM marker and RUN. We 
get the buff color. Now BREAK and 
insert the REM marker in front of Line 
80. 

Just to double-check, let us try to 
paint the triangle that encloses the 
boxes. Let us see if it butts up against 



the hypotenuse (diagonal line). Key in 
Line 90 without the REM marker and 
RUN. When you are finished reinsert the 
REM marker. 

Make any further tests that you can 
dream up. If you haven't gotten food 
for thought and discovered any new 
insights, RUN and consider the display 
as modern art. 



You should have gained a lot of 
respect for DRAW. You should have 
gained some insights about experiment- 
ing; hardly a day at the keyboard should 
go by without learning something new 
about CoCo. We may never become 
experts, but let's have fun practicing 
and experimenting. Next month, well 
make some designs with DRAW. 




Listing 1: LISTING 1 



'LISTING1 

10 PM0DE4 , 1 s PCLS a SCREEN 1,1 

15 'GOTO200 

20 DRAW"S3BM20,70U6R4D4NL4D2BR3 

U6R3D3NL3RD3NL4BR3 NR4U6R4BR3 ND 

6R3FD4GNL3BR4 NR4U3NR3U3R4BR3 NR 

4D3NR3D3BR7 NR4U6R4BD4NL2D2BR3 U 

4IMU2R4NU2D4" 

30 DRAW"BR3NU6BR3 NUR4NU6BR3 U3 

NU3RNE3F3BR3 NU6R4BR3 U6F3E3D6BR 

3 U6F4NU4D2BR3 NR4U6R4D6BR3 U6R4 

D3L4" 

40 DRAM " BM60 , 90NR2U AR4D6L2NUNDBR 

S U6R4D3L3NLF3BR3 R4U3L4U3R4BR3 

R2ND6R2BR3 D&R4U6BR3 D4F2E2U4BR3 

D6E3F3U6BR3 DF2G2DBR4UH2E2UBR3 
D2F2ND2E2U2BR3 R4DG4DR4" 
50 DRAW"BM65,110BRU6NGBR3 R4D4L4 
D2R4BR3 R4U3NL3U3NL4BR3D4R3NRNU4 
02BR4 R4U4L4U2R4BR3 D6R4U3NL4BE3 

R4D6BR3 NR4U4NR4U2R4D6BR7 U6L4D 
3R4BF3 NR4U6R4D6" 
100 GOTO 100 
200 DRAW " S8BM20 , 60U6R4D4NL4D2BRB 

R4U3L4U3R4BR3ND6BR3 ND6F3E3D6BR 
3 U6R4D3NL4BE3 D6R4BR3 NR4U3NR3U 



3R4BF6BR2" 

210 DRAW"U6R4D4NL4D2BR3NU6R4BR3 
U6R4D3NL4BF3 U3NU3R5NU3D3BR3 U6R 
4D4NL4D2BR3 U6R3D2NL3RD4NL4BR3 N 
R4U3NR3U3R4BR3 R2ND6R2" 
220 DRAW"BM0,80U6BR3 NR4D3R4D3N 
L4BR10U6NL2R2BR3 D3ND3R5ND3U3BR3 
NR4D3NR3D3R4BR8 U6R3D2NL3RD4NL4 
BR3 NR4U3NR3U3R4BR3 NR4D3R4D3NL4 
BR6 U6NL2R2BR3" 

230 DRAWBR5ND6R4D4NL4D2BR3 NU&R 
4BR3 U6R4D3NL4BR3 ND3NU3R4NU3D3B 
R3 U6R4D4NL4D2BE3R3" 
240 DRAW " BM 1 , 1 00U6R3D2NL3RD4NL4 
BR3 NR4U3NR3U3R4BR3 R2ND6R2BR8 R 
2ND6R2BR2 NR4D6R4NU6BRB NR4U6R4B 
D4NL2D2BR3 NR4U3NR3U3R4BR3 R2ND6 
R2BR8" 

250 DRAW"D2F2ND2E2U2BR3 NR4D6R4U 
6BR3 D6R4NU6BR3 U6R4D3L3NLF3" 
260 DRAW"BM10,120U6F3E3D6BR3 NR4 
U3NR3U3R4BR3 NR4D3R4D3NL4BR3 R4U 
3L4U3R4BR3 ND6R4D4NL4D2BR3 NR4U6 
R4BD4NL2D2BR3 NR4U3NR3U3R4BRB" 
270 DRAW"ND6R4D4NL4D2BR3 NR4U6R4 
BR3 ND6R4D3L3NLF3BR3 NR4U6R4D6BR 
3 R4U3L4U3R4BR3 NR4D3R4D3NL4BR4 
UBU2U3" 

280 DRAW " S8BM50 , 1 60U6R4D3L3NLF3B 
R3 U6R4D4NL4D2BR3 NU6BR3 U5NUF4N 
U5DBR3 U6R3D2NL3RD4NL4BR3 NR4U6R 
4D6BR3 NU6E3F3U6" 
1000 GOTO 1000 




FOR THE 

COLOR COMPUTER 

VOLUME 1 NOW AVAILABLE 



OLLOWING AND SEND WITH A CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE 



DISK ($21 .95) CASSETTE ($19.95) 

DISK PACKAGE REQUIRES 32K 

16K or 32K CASSETTE PACKAGING 

500 QUESTIONS/ANSWERS 

4 ONE or TWO PLAYER QUIZZES ON 

4 DIFFERENT SUBJECTS 

1 TWO PLAYER QUIZ WITH ALL 4 

SUBJECTS MIXED 



O MOORE COMPUTER SERVICES, INC. 



ALLOW 2 - 3 WEEKS FOR PRE-PAID DELIVERY. FLORIDA RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 5% SALES TAX. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY/ST/ZIP 



CHECK ONE: 
CHECK ONE: 



D DISK 
□ 32K 



D CASSETTE 
□ 16K 



NOTE: 16K CASSETTE DOESN'T INCLUDE THE MIXED SUBJECT QUIZ 



WARNING-YOU MAY BECOME ADDICTED 



160 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



Listing 2: LISTING 2 

'LISTING2 

1 PM0DE4 , 1 1 PCLS t SCREEN 1 , 1 

20 ' DRAW " C 1 BM0 , 0F255BL255E255 " 

30 LINE<0,0)-<255,191) ,PSET:LINE 

-(0, 191 ), PRESET: LINE- (253,0) ,PSE 

T 

40 DRAW"BM50,0D191 BR1U191BR2D19 

1BR3U191BR4D191BR5U191BR6D191BR7 

U191BRBD191BRBU191BR9D191BR10U19 

1BR11D191BR12U191BR13D191BL12U19 

1BR13D191BR1U191" 

50 DRAW " BM0 , B0R255BD 1 L2S5BD2R255 

BD3L255BD4R255BD5L255 " 

60 DRAW"SBBM220,50R5D5L5U5" 

70 DRAW"BM210,70R15U15L15D15" 

80 'PAINT<213,60) ,1,1 

90 'PAINT (240, 77) ,1,1 

100 GOTO 100 



Bonus listing: CLOVER 
'CLOVER 



'(C) 1984, J. KOLAR 
PM0DE3! PCLSi PM0DE4 
A-90: B-86s R«76i P-l . 70 
DIM 6(7) ,T(7) 
CIRCLE(B,8) ,B,1:CIRCLE(7,7) ,8 



10 

30 

40 

50 

60 

.1 

6 1 DRAW " BMB , BNL3NR3NU3ND3NE3NF3N 

G3H3" 

70 BET(0,0)-(16,16) ,S,G 

72 CIRCLE(38,B) ,6, 1 »PAINT (40,8) f 
1,1 

73 GET(30,0)-(46,16) ,T,G 
80 PCLS s SCREEN 1,1 

90 FOR Q-.15 TO .05 STEP -1 

100 F0RZ-1T07.16 STEPQ:C-Z 

110 C=40+(C)+R#F«90 

115 K-C0S(R/2)*C0S(C)#SIN(C) 

120 X»INT(A-6+R*C0S(C))iY-INT(B- 

8+R*SIN(K)) 

130 PUT(X+36,Y+10)-(X+52,Y+26),S 

,OR 

135 PUT(X+36,Y+10)-(X+52,Y+26) ,T 

, AND: SOUND 100,1 

140 X=INT(A-6+R*SIN(K))iY*INT(B- 

S+R*C0S(O) 

150 PUT(X+36,Y+8)-(X+52,Y+23),S, 

OR 
155 PUT(X+36,Y+8)-(X+52,Y+23),T, 
AND: SOUND 100,1 
160 NEXT Z,Q 

1 70 PLAY " V20O3LBCO2AF A03L 1 6C AF AA 
FACV15L8FAAFV10L4C" a GOTO90 



nwEWj 



r 




MAROONED! 

By Steve Hartford 
Sitting on the back porch one after- 
noon, you see o strange, flashing UFO 
descend from the clouds & land out in 
the corn field. Being the curious type, 
you run out to investigate and find a 
spaceship with it's hatch open.., as you 
step inside, the hatch closes and the 
ship takes off! You must find a way to 
get back home. A great graphics 
adventure' 39K & one disk drive 
required. 

Disk or Amdek $29.95 




Blackjack Dealer 
Feeler Dealer 

These two programs help you develop 
your Blackjack skill and strategy. In 
Blackjack Dealer, the computer deals 
the cards and plays the dealer's hana 
against you. Feeler Dealer enables you 
to test your strategy by playing the 
desired number of hands using your 
techniques & tendencies. A great 
teacher for new Blackjack players and 
a valuable tool for the veteran player, 
Both programs included, 32K ex- 
tended. 

Tape $24.95 Disk $29.95 




EAGLE 

A graphic-enhanced lunar simulator. The 
pilot breaks oul of lunar orbit and attempts 
a soft landing on the lunar surface. 
Joysticks control thrust and craft altitude 
and information is continually displayed 
on horizontal and vertical velocities, ac- 
celeration values, vertical and horizontal 
distances from target, fuel consumption 
and much more, Disk version allows choice 
of landing site between Mars and Earth's 
moon. A great tool for the future astronaut 
or physicist. 32K, 2 joysticks required. 

Tape - $24.95 Disk - $29.95 



Testmaker 

Disk Only 

Maycode 

Disassembler 

TDIR 

Tape Directory 

Alphacopy 

Disk Only 32K 



P51 Mustang 32k 
Worlds Of Flight 
Sailor Man mk 
Trekboer 32k 
Tut's Tomb 32K 
Zookey Typing Tutor 
To Preserve Quandic 
Disk • 32K 
LIZPACK 
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Add $3.00 for Disk 



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$33.75 



This Month's 
Special! 

Sketchpad 

A graphics drawing program designed to 
provide the computer hobbyist with easy 
manipulation of the powerful graphics 
capabilities of the CoCo. Advanced 
programmers can design graphics 
screens and characters for Basic and ML 
programs and games. 32K, 2 Joysticks and 
disk drive required. 

$19.95 

Reg, $29,95 - Expires 6/30/85 



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Amdek Color 1' $199 

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Amdek Color 300 $269 

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Mark Data Video Driver 

Works On All Cocas • No Soldering 

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Az. Residents Add 7% Tax 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 



161 



The Complete 
Rainbow 
Guide 
To OS-9 



Has 



jjfW 



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The book you've been waiting for to take advantage of the full 
capacity of your Color Computer. Written by Dale L Puckett and 
Peter Dibble, two of the foremost authorities on OS-9, this new 
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the system through a step-by-step process. For only $19.95. 

Also available is the RAINBOW GUIDE TO OS-9 DISK PACKAGE, 
which contains all of the programs and workshops in the book. You'll 
want the book for the tutorials, and the disk package to save the 
many hours of typing in the lengthy programs. A twq-disk package 
for only $31 (does not include book). 



Other fine books in The Rainbow Bookshelf include: 



— The Rainbow Book of Simulations 

features 20 award-winning programs 
from the rainbow's very first Simulation 
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Book $9.95 

Tape $9.95 

OS-9 is a trademark of 

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— The Rainbow Book of Adventures 

which includes all 13 winners from the 
rainbow's first Adventure contest. A 
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Book $7.95 

Tape $7.95 

Keep your library up to date. Order now! 



I want to start my own 
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(Please note: The tapes and disks offered by The Rainbow Bookshelf 
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Falsoft, Inc. 

The Falsoft Building 

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Please send me: Q The Rainbow Book of Simulations $ 9.95 

P Rainbow Simulations Tape $ 9.95 

□ The Complete Rainbow Guide to OS-9(book only)$19.95 

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Add $1 per book Shipping &nd Handling in U.S. 
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To order by phone, call: (502) 228-4492 




16K 
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H RAJNfOW [ 
h Ml 



Test your music and memory skills . . ■ 




(Editor's Note: This program has been submitted by Mel 
Richardson, Irene Erwin and the Gifted/ Talented Class 
at Meadow Homes School in Concord, Calif Under Mr. 
Richardson's guidance, it was developed by the 19 students 
of this class.) 

Mel Richardson instructed the Gifted /Talented 
Class for eight and one-half months. He brought 
his own computer for the students to use and 
prepared lessons the entire time. He taught all the students 
BASIC computer language and instructed them in program- 
ming techniques. None of the students had previous 
experience in the use of the computer. 

In eight and one-half months, the students progressed 
from the simplest operations to completing two games for 
use on the TRS-80, At first, many of the students were 
reluctant even to touch the computer, but as time 
progressed, many of them became quite proficient. The 
growth in their knowledge is very evident and extremely 
exciting. It is particularly refreshing to see students have 
a chance to develop some expertise in this field. 

Program Instructions 

The game, Name That Song, was developed over a period 
of about three months after the students had become 
comfortable with the use of the computer. Since none of 
us knew much about music, it was a learning experience 



(Mel Richardson teaches BASIC to gifted and talented 
elementary school children. He attended San Francisco 

State University.) 



for all. We had to learn the names of notes, the value 
of each note and in which octave to place the notes. Students 
searched for music they felt would be recognized easily, 
then programmed the music. 

Name That Song consists of an introduction which asks 
for player number one's name (seated on the left side of 
the computer using the up-arrow key), then asks for player 
number two's name (seated on the right side of the computer 
using the right-arrow key). After a moment's pause, the 
computer will play one note and give each of the two 
contestants an opportunity to name the song by pressing 
his or her respective arrow. If they cannot name the song 
after one note s an additional note is added after each try 
up to a total of 15 notes before the computer names the 
song. 

Points are scored for a correct answer and deducted for 
a wrong answer. The game may be terminated at any time 
by pressing *E/ Score and winner will be shown at the 
end of the game. The computer gives simple, easy-to-follow 
directions throughout the game. 

Graphics were produced to highlight the game, then tried 
out on a class of students who had not participated in 
the program. It was an instant success; soon there was 
a room full of students who wanted a chance to try their 
skills. For many students, this was the first time they had 
even touched a computer, but the excitement was 
contagious. Hopefully, more students will have an 
opportunity to participate in computer education programs 
in the future. 

(If you have any questions, please call or write Mr 
Richardson, 2925 Monument Blvd., Apt. 115, Concord 
CA 94520, phone (415) 671-7053.) 

June 1985 THE RAINBOW 163 



The listing: NAMESONG 



0^200 . . . 


...103 


2940 . . 


...166 


7 520... 


.. .30 


3160 . . 


...149 


780 .. . 


...121 


3410 . . 


7 


940 ... 


....76 


3650 . . 


...228 


1200 . . 


...255 


3870 : . 


....65 


1480 .. 


....53 


4130 . . 


...171 


1700 .. 


...190 


4440 . . 


...247 


1980 . . 


...111 


4700 . . 


...209 


2220 . . 


....61 


END .. 


...186 


2480 . . 


....26 







10 POKE 65495,0 

20 CLEAR 1000 

30 CLS:Y=0:X-0 

40 NY*= " BK20D20L6H 1 2D 1 2L6U20R6F 1 

0U10R6" 

50 AY*= " R20D20L4U8L 1 2D8L4U20D8BR 

4R 1 2U4L 1 2D4BL4UBR20 " 

60 MY*- " R20D20L4U 1 6L4D 1 6L4U 1 6L4D 

16L4U20R20" 

70 EY*« " R20D4L 1 6D4R 1 6D4L 1 6D4R 1 6D 

4L20U20R20" 

80 T Y*= " R20D4LBD 1 6L4U 1 6LBU4R20 " 

90 HY*= " BR20D20L4UBL 1 2D8L4U20R4D 

8R12U8R4" 

100 BY*="BR5" 

110 TX*="R2BDBLBD20L12U20L8U8R28 



1 20 UX *» " BR2BD28L2BU28RBD20R 1 2U2 

0R8" 

1 30 NX*-" BR2BD2BLBU4H 1 2D 1 6LBU2BR 

BF12U12RB" 

140 EX*="R28D8L20D4R20D4L20D4R20 

DBL2BU2BR28" 

150 MZ*-"D16U16R8D16U16R8D16U16" 

160 EZ*«"D16R16BU8L16U8R16" 

170 AZ*= ,, D16BR16U8L16U8R16D8U8" 

1 80 DZ*= " D 1 6R 1 2E4UBH4L 1 2R 1 2BR4 " 

190 0Z*= ,, D16R16U16L16R16" 

200 WZ*«"D16RaU16D16RBU16" 

210 HZ*»"D16UBR16D8U16" 

220 SZ*="D8R16D8L16BU16R16" 

230 CZ*="D16R16BU16L16R16" 

240 LZ*="D16R16BU16" 

250 CA*«"D12R12BU12L12R12" 

260 0A*="D12R12U12L12R12" 

270 NA*="D12BR12H12BR12D12U12" 

280 R A*= " D 1 2U4R8D4U4R4UBL 1 2R 1 2 " 

290 DA*="D12R8E4U4H4LBR8" 

300 LA*="D12R12BU12" 

310 AA*="D12U6R12D6U12L12R12" 

320 IA*-"D12U12" 

330 FA*="D12U6RBL8U6R12" 








• Six software selectable expansion ports. 

• Disk controller cartridge connector in back. 

• Parallel interface. 

• 2K pages mapped anywhere. 

• Programmable write protection by page. 

• Programmable timer. 

• Can access memory simultaneously at 
different addresses, 

• Single stepping through ROM routines. 

• improved CoCo serial port performance. 

• Memory mapping makes Disk Spooling, 
RAM Disk, and Disk Cache transparent to 
user programs. 

• Plugs directly into CoCo cartridge port. 

• OS/9 and RS DOS compatible. 

• One year warranty. 

OS/9 is a trademark of Microware. 



COLORBURST 128K 
COLORBURST 64K 



... S599. 
. .. $570. 



COLORBURST 512K . . . . . . $799. 

Please add $14.00 for shipping Shipping outside U.S. and Canada add $30.00. All prices in U.S. dollars. 



164 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



340 A*»"02LBCCFFFFFFEF6F2" 

350 B*="CC66GBGGFGAP2" 

360 X*-A*+B* 

370 R*="CEPBCEPBCEP4P8" 

380 S*="CEFEDP8FP4PB" 

390 PMODE 3,1 

400 PCLS2 

410 SCREEN 1,0 

420 Y*-X*+R*+S* 

430 DRAW "BM40,12!"+NY* 

440 XY*="BM+6,0" 

450 QY*="BM+4,0; " 

460 DRAW XY*+AY*+QY*+MY*+QY*+EY* 

+QY*+BY*+TY*+QY*+HY#+QY*+AY* 

470 DRAW " BM2 12,12s" +TY* 

480 DRAW"BM64,44s"+TX* 

490 QX*- ,, BM+4,0;" 

500 DRAW QX*+UX*+QX*+NX*+QX*+EX* 

510 DRAW"BM4,10B; "+MZ* 

520 QZ*="BM+6,0;" 

530 DRAW QZ*+EZ*+QZ*+AZ*+QZ*+DZ* 

+QZ*+OZ*+QZ*+WZ* 

540 DRAW " BM 1 40 , 1 08 ; " +H* 

550 DRAW QZ*+HZ*+QZ*+OZ*+QZ*+MZ* 

+QZ*+EZ*+QZ*+SZ* 

560 DRAWBM68, 132; "+SZ* 



570 QZ*»"BM+6,0" 

580 DRAW QZ*+CZ*+QZ*+HZ*+OZ#+QZ* 

+DZ*+QZ*+LZ* 

590 DRAW " BM28 , 1 72 ; " +C A* 

600 QA*»"BM+6,0" 

610 DRAW QA*+OA*+QA*+NA#+QA*+CA* 

+QA*+OA*+QA*+RA*+QA*+DA* 

620 DRAW"BM164,172;"+CA* 

630 DRAW QA*+AA#+QA*+LA*+QA#+IA* 

+QA*+FA* 

640 PAINT<42,14) ,0,0 

650 X«66:Y»14:O=0 

660 PAINT (42, 14) ,0,0 

670 PAINT<X,Y) ,0,0 

680 P-P+l 

690 X-X+24 

700 IF P<3 THEN 670 

710 IF P=3 THEN X=142;0»l 

720 IF P<7 BDTQ 670 

730 X=66:Y=46 

740 PAINT(X,Y) ,4,0 

750 X«X+34 

760 IF X>168 THEN 780 

770 GOTO 740 

780 PLAY X* 

790 T*=INKEY*sIF T*-"" THEN 790 



NEED AN INEXPENSIVE 

SERIAL-PARALLEL 

INTERFACE? 

SP-2 INTERFACE for EPSON PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ Fits inside printer — No AG Plugs 

■ Optional external switch ($5 00 extra) frees 
parallel port for use with other computers 

■ *49 95 (plus *3 00 shipping) 

SP-3 INTERFACE for MOST OTHER PRINTERS: 

■ 300-19,200 BAUD rates 

■ External to printer — No AC Plugs 

■ Built in modem /printer switch — no need for 
Y-cables or plugging/unplugging cables 

■ $ 64 95 (plus $3oo shipping) 

Both also available for RS-232 and Apple IIC computers. 

Co Co Serial Cables 15 ft.— HO. 

Co Co/RS-232 Cables 15 ft.— $20. Other cables on request. 

CP.O. Box 492 
. Piscataway, NJ 08854 

N (201)752-0144 

R ENGINEERING 

DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED! 



The book you've been 
waiting for... 

THE ULTIMATE COLOR COMPUTER 
REFERENCE GUIDE AND TOOL-KIT 

by David D. McLeod and Robert van der Poel 

* Complete details on every BASIC, Extended BASIC 
and Disk BASIC commands, plus syntax, parameters 
and potential errors. 

* An entire section (47 pages) deals with making your 
programs run faster and more efficiently. 

* Extensive subroutine library full of BASIC and 
Machine Language routines which can easily be 
incorporated into your own programs. 

* Over 350 - '8Vfe by 1 1 pages. 

Easy to read! A valuable asset for every Coco owner! 



$27.95 (U.S.) or $34.95 (CDN.) plus $3.50 shipping. 

Immediate shipment - Write or phone Today. 
Visa, Mastercard, Mbney Order or Certified Cheque. 
Canadians - send $2.00 for our Complete Price List. 



DEALER INQUIRIES 
WELCOME 



ii 



CMD MICRO COMPUTER SERVICES LTD. 

10447- 124 STREET 

EDMONTON, ALBERTA. CANADA 

T5N 1R7 

PHONE (403) 486-7109 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 165 



800 WW*- " D20F4U20H4R4F4D 1 6RBH4L4 

R4U 1 6F4D 1 6U 1 6H4R4F4D 1 6R8H4L4R4U 1 

6F4D 1 6U 1 6H4R4F4D20L2BR2SU20H4 " 

8 1 RR*» " D20F4U20H4R29F4L2SR28D 1 

2L4DBL8U8L4D4F4BL8L8R8U8R4L4BL4B 

U4U4R20D4H4F4L20BR24U8H4 " 

B20 00*- " D20F4U20H4R28F4L2BR28D2 

0L28R4BU4U 1 2R20D 1 2H4U8D8L 1 6D4R20 

BR4U16H4" 

830 NN*= " D20F4U20H4R8F4L8R8F 1 2U 1 

2H4D 1 2U 1 2R8F4D20L8H 1 6D 1 6L4BR28U2 

BL8R8H4" 

B40 GS*« " D20F4U20H4R28F4D4L24D 1 2 

R20H4F4U4L20R8H4U4F4D4U4R 1 6D 1 2L2 

BR2BU 1 2H4F4BU4U4L2BR2BH4 " 

850 TT*- " D4F4U4H4R2BF4L2BD4R 1 2BR 

4R 1 2U4D4L 1 2D 1 6L4U 1 6L4D 1 2F4U 1 6BR4 

R12U4H4" 

860 EE*= " D20F4U20H4R28F4L28D20R2 

8U4L24U4R20F4H4R4U4L24U4R20F4H4R 

4U4H4" 

870 CC*= " D20F4U20H4R28F4D4L24D 1 2 

U4R20F4L24R24D4L28R2BBU 1 6U4L28R2 

BH4" 

880 CLS SPRINTS 225," FIRST PLAYER 

S NAME"; 

890 INPUT T*(2) 

900 Q*(6)="T2" 



910 CLS:PRINT@225,"NEXT PLAYERS 

NAME"; 

920 INPUT U*(2) 

PRINT@2,T*(2);T;" 



"sU*(2) 



A*» " L4T5CEFL 1 GP4L4EFL 1 B " 

B*« " P4L4CEFL2GECEL 1 D " 

C*» " P8L4EEDL2CL4CL2E " 

D*» " L4BBBL 1 FL4EF " 

E**= " L2BEL4CLBDD+EGL4 AL 1 03C " 

Q*=A*+B*+C*+D*+E* 

Q*<1)="TBJ0UT" 

Q* ( B ) - " X t F0@U I FSTB J OUT@HP@N 



930 

;u 

940 

950 

960 

970 

980 

990 

1000 

1010 

BSDIJOHSJO" 

1020 GOSUB 3780 

1030 GOSUB 3240 

1 040 A*» " T202LBBBL4BL8BBL4BLBB03 

DL402GL 1 6GL2B03LBCCCC" 

1 050 B*= " L8C02BBL 1 6BBL8BAAB02L4A 

03D02LSBBL4B" 

1 060 C*= " L8BBL4BL8B03D02L4GL 1 6AL 

2B03L8CCL4CL 1 6C " 

1 070 D*= " L8C02BBL 1 6BB03LBDDC02 AL 

4G" 

1080 

1090 

1100 

1110 



Q*«A*+B*+C*+D* 

Q*(1)="CFMMT" 

Q* (8) ="KJOHMF@CFMMT" 

GOSUB 3780 



64K Extended 
$139.95 
Color Computer II Sale 



COLOR COMPUTERS' 



64K Ext. Basic 139.95 



Videotex w/Compuservfe 
was 39.95 Now 24.95 

Computer Recorder Panasonic 39.95 



c 

H p 

E R E 

A 7 V 

P C E 

E E R 

S E 




64K Chip Upgrade $ 49.95 

Dust Cover CoCo I. 1.99 

Color Computer II Keyboards 

Fits CoCo I Reg. 39.95 34.95 

Sanyo Monitor Hi-Res 9" Green 

Reg. 169.95 Now 99.95 

Disk Drive 1 139.95 

Disk Drive w/controller & cable 239.95 

Extended Basic w/book 39.95 



THE COMPUTER CENTER 

901-761-4565, 5512 Poplar, Memphis, TN 38119 

Add $5.90forshipping& handling on Computers. $2.80 on any other items-per order. Visa & M/C Accepted 



166 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



1120 

1130 

1140 

1150 

103C" 

1160 

1170 

1180 

1190 

1200 

1210 

1220 

1230 

1240 

1250 

1260 

1270 

L4D" 

1280 

1290 

1300 

1310 

1320 

1330 

1340 

2L8B- 

1350 

4B-B- 

1360 



QDSUB 3240 

A*= " T303L4CD2A03L2C " 

B*« " L4DC02B-AGAL2B- " 

C*- " D3L4C02FL8FFL4FLBFBAB-L 

D*- " 03L4C02BBB- AGL2F " 

Q*=A*+B*+C*+D# 

Q*(1)="NB0" 

Q* < 8 ) - " U I JT@PMEQNBO " 

GOSUB 3780 

GOSUB 3240 

A*- " 02L4GG AL2F#L8GL4 A " 

B*= " L4BBL403CL202BLBAL4G " 

C*-"L4AGF#L2G" 

D*«"D3L4DDDL2DL8C02B" 

E*= " 03L4CCGL2C02L8BL4A " 

F*= " L4B03L8C02L8BAGL4B03L8C 

G*= " L8EC02L4BAL2G " 

Q#=A*+B*+C*+D*+E*+F*+G* 

Q*m« ,, BNFSJDB" 

D*(B)»"BNFSJDB" 

GOSUB 3780 

GOSUB 3240 

A*= " 02LBB-B-03CD02B-03DL4C0 

B-03CDD2L4B-A" 

B*= " L8B-B-03CDE-DC02B-AFBAL 

II 

C*-"LBGAGFGAL4B-LBFGFE-L4DF 



1 370 D*« " L8GAGFBAB-GFB- A03C02L4B 
-B-" 

1380 Q*-A*+B#+C*+D* 

1390 Q*<l)*"ZBOLFF" 

1400 Q*<S)«"ZBOLFF@EPPEMF" 

1410 GOSUB 3780 

1420 GOSUB 3240 

1 430 A*- " 02L8AGFGAAL4AL8GBL4BLBA 

03L8CL4C" 

1440 B*-"02LBABFBAAAABBABL2F" 

1450 Q*-A*+B* 

1460 Q*<1)="NBSZ" 

1470 Q* <8) ="NBSZeiBEeB@MJUUMFSMB 

NC" 

1480 GOSUB 3780 

1490 GOSUB 3240 

1500 A$«"02L2DDL4DLBEL2F#L4F#L8E 

L4F#L8GL2AP8" 

1510 B*= " 03LBDDD02L8A A AF#F#F#DDD 

L4AL8GL4F#LBEL2D " 

1520 Q**A*+B* 

1530 Q*(1)-"SPX" 

1540 q* <b> -"spxespxespxezpvsecPB 

U" 

1550 GOSUB 3780 

1560 GOSUB 3240 

1 570 A*- " 02L4GBGDEEL2DL4BBAAL2GP 

4L4DGGGDEEL2DL4BBAAL2GP4 " 




Authorized Star Mlcrontca Service Center * Call for return authorization number. 



620 Stuart St. 
Green Bay, Wl 54301 
(414) 432-4635 

SAME DAY SHIPPING BEFORE 2 PM 



r THE COSMOS CONNECTION 
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The SG-10 package includes: 
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DELUXE MANUAL 
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ELITE CALC $64.95 
ELITE WORD $64.95 
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THE SG-10 PACKAGE 
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THE POWER BEHIND THE PRINTED WORD. 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 167 



158(3 BS="LBDDL4BBSL8DDL4SBL2GLBB 

GL4GLBBBL4GLBBSBGL4BBBBBDEEL2DL4 

BBAAL1G" 

1590 Q*-A*+B* 

1600 Q*<1)-"GBSN" 

1610 Q* < B ) - " PME@NBD@EPQBFiE@ I BEfiB 

SGBSIM" 

1620 GQSUB 37B0 

1630 GOSUB 3240 

1 640 A*» " 02L4FGAFFBAFAB-03L2C02L 

4AB-" 

1 650 B*« " 03L2CLBCDC02LBB-L4AFD3L 

BCDCD2LBB-" 

1660 C*-"L4AFFCL2FL4FCL2F" 

1670 Q*-A*+B*+C* 

1680 Q*(1)="KBDRVFT" 

1 690 QS ( 8 ) » " BSFSFfiKBDRVF t " 

1700 GOSUB 3780 

1710 GOSUB 3240 

1 720 A*= " T302L4FGAL2B-L 1 B-L4B-FG 

L2AL1 A" 

1 730 B*- " L4CF AL2GL 1 GL8GGU4FGL2 AL 

1A" 

1740 C*»"LSFFI_4BAL2B-L1B-LBB-B-L 

4FBL2AL1A" 

1 750 D*» " L40L2BL4GGL2EL8CL4EBL 1 F 

(I 

1760 Q*=A*+B*+C*+D* 

1770 Q*U>-"MBOE" 

1780 Q* <8> -"UI JTeMBOEejTeZPVSQMB 

OE" 

1790 BOSUB 37B0 

1B00 GOSUB 3240 

1810 A*="02LBCCL4DCFL2E" 

1820 B*-"LBCCL4DCSL2F" 

1830 C*-"L8CC03L4C02L4AFEL2D" 

1840 D*-"L8B-B-L4AFGL2F" 

1850 Q*-A*+B*+C*+D* 

1860 Q*<1)-"CJSUIEBZ" 

1870 Q*<B)*"IBQQ2@CJSUIEBZ" 

1880 GOSUB 3780 

1890 GOSUB 3240 

1900 A*«»"02L4CELB. . . GLBEL4GAL2B " 

1910 B*«"L4EBL1AL2G" 

1 920 C*« " L4EGLB . . . BL8EL4FEL2D " 

1930 D#^"L4CDL2EDL4C" 

1940 Q*-A*+B*+C*+D* 

1950 Q*<1)-"CPBU" 

1960 Q* (B) -"NJDIBFMeSPXeUIFSCPBU 

SBTIPSF" 

1970 GOSUB 3780 

1980 BOSUB 3240 

1990 A*-"02L46LB. . .BLBEL4EGLB. . . 

BLBDL4DEFBA02BL4. . .GL4G" 

2000 B*-"LB. . . GL8EL4EGL8. . . GLBQL 

4D03L4DC#DE02L4A03L4. . .D02L4B" 

20 1 C*» " 03L8 . . . ELBEL4DL4GL8 . . , C 



02L8BL4B03L4CD02L4BAG03L4. . .C" 

2020 D*="L4CLB. . . C02L8AL4A03CL8. 

. .G02LBSL4GGA03L4C02G03DL4. . .C" 

2030 Q*=A*+B*+C*+D* 

2040 Q*(1)»"BNFSJDB" 

2050 Q* ( 8 ) - " BNFS J DBQU I FfiCFB VU J S V 

M" 

2060 GQSUB 3780 

2070 GOSUB 3240 

2080 A*-"01L8B-02L4E-L8E-L4FL8FS 

B-BL4E-" 

2090 B*= "01 LBB-D2L4E-L8E-L4FLBFL 

4.GE-" 

2100 C$="L4E-LGE-L4FLB FGB-GL4.E 

2110 D#= " 03L8CP202L4FL8A-L4 . GE- " 

2120 Q*=A*+B*+C*+D* 

2130 Q*(1)-"QPQ" 

2 1 40 Q* < B > - " QPQSHPFTSU I FSXFBTFM " 

2150 BOSUB 37B0 

2160 GOSUB 3240 

2 1 70 A** " 02LB . . . BL8AL4GL 1 E " 

2180 B*«"03L2DL4D02L1B" 

2 1 90 W*« " 03L2CL4C02L2 . 6 " 

2200 C*«*"L2AL4A03L8. . . C02L8BL4AL 

B...BLBAL4BL2.E" 

2210 b*«"03L2DL4DLB. . .FL8D02L4B0 

3L1CL2E" . 

2220 E*="LB. . . C02LBGL4ELB. . . 6LBF 

L4DL1.C" 

2230 Q*-A*+A*+B*+W*+C*+C*+D*+E* 

2240 Q*U>-"OJHIU" 

2250 Q*(8)-"TJMF0Ue0JHIU" 

2260 GOSUB 3780 

2270 BOSUB 3240 

2280 A*- " 02L4 . EDL2 . C " 

2290 B*»"L4.SL4FLSFL2.E" 

2300 C*« " D3L4CL8C02BAB03C02L8GL4 

GL8B" 

2310 D*="03LBCCC02BAB03L4C02L8BL 

4GL8G" 

2320 F*="03L8CCC02BAB03LBC02LBBB 

6AFL4.EDL2.C" 

2330 Q*=A*+A*+B*+B*+C*+D*+F* 

2340 Q$<1>« ,, UISFF ,, 

2350 Q*<8>-"UISFFeCMJ0E«iNJDF ,, 

2360 GOSUB 3780: BOSUB 3240 

2370 A*- " 02LB ... BL8AU4GFEFL2B " 

2380 B*- M L4DEL2FL4EFL2B" 

2390 C*-"L2DBL4EL2C" 

2400 Q**A*+B*+A*+C* 

2410 Q*<1)«• , MP0EP0 ,, 

2420 Q* (8) -"MPOEPO«qSJEHF«JTQBBM 

MJOHeEPXO" 

2430 BOSUB 3780a GOSUB3240 

2440 A*- " 02L4CCEG03L2 . C02L 1 AL4AF 

BAL1B" 



168 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Why do more CoCo owners 

choose 'REAL TALKER'? 



Sure it's priced right, but there's more... 

Thousands of J Real Talked owners know 'Real Talker' beats ALL 'Real Talked is compatible with any T6K, 32K, 64K Extended nr 

other Coco voice synthesizers in ease of use and flexibility, And, non-extended Color Computer, ft works with any cassette or 

NO other Coco talker has a clearer, more intelligible voice, disk system and comes complete and ready to talk through vour 

Thais quite a lor of advantage when you consider Real Talker's T.V. or monitor speaker- Price includes the 'Real Talker' Ac! 

unbeatable price, Yet, Real Talker has some important features tronic voice synthesizer in a ROM pack, software on cassette 

that you simply will not find in other Coco talkers: tmay be transferred to disk), and user manual. 

^p C u?«^ngSlSl„Vin^. V N5 §?^ s "^^B NOW INCLUDED WITH 

minutes thanks to this powerful /V 'REAL TALKER'* 

new command. Type SAY * _m 

"ANYTHING YOU WANT" and ^^^ ^ 1 

your words are instantly spoken. ^^*^**\-~ - ■ ?J ™ TAiK-lhis fnterai five 'Eliza" 

It's that simple. Think how easy ^ - ii ""' Al y co* type psychoanalyst program will 

this makes creating speaking Basic M , Rf flL TAU^J discuss your innermost problems 

programs. Adding speech to your ■ * , i ! ,,, I 

existing programs fs a snap too. ^ ^ JM ° 

COM VERT' ■ This is a truly power- _^^^^g^M , Z 'TALKING BATTLESHIP'^ you 

lul command tor the basic pro- gg "*^^^» *"*"r T „ iK vS . the computer in this speaking 

gramer. CONVERT automatically ^ ^^m, ^1 W version of the classic game, 

transforms a machine language ^^^^^^V H ,., f 

dependent speaking program into Wk ^^|| # ^ ' / \ i h 3. TALKING BLACKJACK'- Play lor 

a stand-alone Basic program. In M " -'";^- ; ;; ;/ big stakes against a rather talkative 

other words, you can effortlessly ^^^^^1 ' * raci™ H^lor 

write speaking Basic programs that ^g^^^^ l t1S!no clealer 

do not require a machine language ^^ 

translator in memory. This is a uni- tr^, w _ — CjNm Y 

que feature of 'Real Talker'. No *wmm* f 

other voice synthesizer gives you ff\ m^ ^\_ tf\ mm 

anything even remotely ap* <ff ea / Talker- is a Mi-featured electronic voice sm- 4L L k f J CJ *m 

eX'^ttsX isCfc ^^^li^rr^ w^r 25 r 1 " ^J V S 1 ** 

siderahly more. * ,m W P'"g ft jfffo the side Ot your computer. * 4*T **T 

Other features include software controlled pitch, unlimited ^ EAl JALKERr (for the original Color Computer!... ...$59.95 

vocabulary text-to-speech, and even a program that will recite 'REAL TALKERS (for the Color Computer^), „ .. $64 95 

any ASCII file (such as from Telewriter-64 & other word pro- , y RWA i rH , wr rijM „ t „ ,. . , 

cessors). You also get Colorware's unique fullscreen phoneme 'BRANCHING CABLE For disk systems. If you have a disk 

editor program that let's vou experiment with an Kh s^Sch ^* m bu do J 01 fe a Radt ° Shatk Mu J ti " SIot unit ' thi * 
at it's most fundamental level. ^ P economical cable will allow to connect and use your 

Real Talker and Disk system together.-.,,,. , lf , 27.95 



TALKU 




\i you have a Real Talker', do not deprive yourself 
of this absolutely incredible machineJanguage 
Talking Head simulation program. White other 
talking head simulations use a minimal cartoon 
like face, TALKHEAD uses high resolution, full- 
screen, digitized images of an actual person's face 
to create a lite like animated effect. 




SOFTWARE FOR THE 'REAL TALKER' 

TALKHEAD can be easily commanded in Basic to 
appear on screen and say anything you want. 
Available on cassette or disk for only $19.95, 
TALKHEAD requires 64K and a Colorware 'Real 
Talker'. 

ONLY$19.95 



ACTUAL UmnOUCHED PHOTO 



s- *= COLOR WARE INC. 

\f*fml{mBWA DC 7S03F 7™/f J A ve. 
\?+*+*m+*Vm JF/inC Woodhaven, NY 11421 

(718) 647-2864 




• • * ORDERING INFORMATION * * + 



ADD 13.00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING 
CO.D.'S ADD MOO EXTRA 

SHIPPING AND HANDLING FOR CANADA IS (5 OH 
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTER CARD, M.O/S, OttOTS. 
NY RESIDENTS MUST ADD SALES TAX 





This is one of those rare 
programs that will captivate 
everyone in your family.... 
No one can see CoCo Max 
and not want to try it! 




We are all witnessing an exciting revolu- 
tion in microcomputers: a radically new 
kind or computer and software that 
opens a whole new world of creative 
power to computer users. 

It was inevitable that this exciting ap- 
proach would be brought to the CoCo, 
With this in mind, Colorware chose lo 
go all out and maximize this new con- 
cept for the color computer. That meant 
designing not just software but hardware 
too. It meant thousands ot hours of pure 
machine language programming, Rarely 
has this much effort been applied to one 
product for the Color Computer. 





UNMATCHED CAPABILITY... 

Because we took the maximum approach: 

highly optimized machine code combin* 
ed with hardware, CoCo Max truly 
stands above the rest as the ultimate 
creative tool for the Color Computer. It's 
unrivaled performance lets you create 
with more brilliance and more speed 
than any similar system - much more 
than you ever imagined possible. And, 
you can do it in black & white or color. 



file Edit ftooaies Foni Sim*? 



. 



iMerooryij 



an ■■■■ 



BIM ■■■ ■■■■■■ 

■ ■■■■■ 13 mi * 



s; "a 



li si ::™S5 2£ 

JB fill ■■■ ■■■ ■■■■ 

la *IV'U •!!■ S'B'S A 

■■ ■■ to - . 

«£ S* --«. i». ■■ 

!■■■■■ UMMU «■■■ II 




All the sophisticated power of the bigger 
systems is there: Icons, Pull-Down Menus, 
full Graphic Editing, Font Styles, and all 
kinds of handy tools and shortcuts. 

Plug your joystick, mouse or touch pad 
into CoCo Max's Hi-Res Input Unit, Then 
use a delightfully simple Point-and-Click 
method to get any of CoCo Max's power- 
ful graphic tools. It has them all: 



You can Brush f Spray or Fill with any Col- 
or, Shading or Pattern, Use Rubber Band 
Lines and Shapes (square, rectangle, cir- 
cle, elipse, etc.) to create pertect illustra- 
tions with speed and ease. There \ a Pen- 
cil an Eraser and even a selection ot 
Caligraphy Brushes. And, as you can see, 
CoCo Max can do a lot with text 
All of the newest special effects are 
there: Trace Edges, Flip, Invert, Brush Mir- 
rors, etc. And all ot the very latest super- 
capabilities like: Undo, which 
automatically reverses youf mistakes, and 
Fat Bits which zoom*, vnu \\a\ in on anv 
part ot your subject lo allow dot-tor-dot 
precision. 




THE BIG PICTURE 

The large image box in the middle of the 
CoCo Max screen is actually only a win- 
dow on an even larger image, Use the 
Poini-and Click Hand" to effortlessly 
move your window over any portion ot 
the larger image You have a working 
area of up to $M times the area of the 
window itself. 

FLEXIBLE PRINTING... 

CoCo Max gives you many ways to print. 
Fill a whole page with your image or 
condense two full CoCo screens to less 
than 14 page for a finely detailed copy, 
Dump" your CoCo Max screen full size 
or shrink it to % page size. 



FREEDOM TO CREATE... 

Anyone who wants to create anything at 
all on their CoCo screen or printer will 
certainly be very glad to meet CoCo 
Max. CoCo Max's friendly yet 
sophisticated graphic and text 
capabilities let you almost instantly pro- 
duce illustrations, diagrams, charts, 




graphs, and computer art - for serious 

use or just tor creative tun. 





rile 


Edit Goodies Font SlyJt ^ 




\| 

zm 
cm 


sn znflERrv = 


1 


|w^f|fcj 











tion by using software schemes such as 
sliding windows, Although clever, these 
schemes yield sluggish and awkward 
results. Only CoCo Max does it the right 
way. The CoCo Max Hi-Res Input Unit 
plugs into your ROM slot and adds an 
entirely new joystick input to your com 
puter - a precision one with a 49,152 
point resolution to match the CoCo 
screen exactly. 
Plug your same joystick, mouse or touch 



You may then use CoCo Max's graphic 
magic on it. The DS-69 is available as an 
option from Colorware from £149.95 
complete with its own software on disk 
or tape- Using the DS-69 with a disk re- 
quires an RS multi-pak adaptor. 





jfr- 



COCO MAX REQUIREMENTS 

The CoCo Max System includes the Hi- 
Res Input Unit, software on disk or 
cassette (please specify) and user manual. 
It will work on any 64K Extended or non- 




AN ABSOLUTE GUARANTEE 

CoCo Max is a hard ware/sou ware system 
that no software-only system can 
match. Get CoCo Max and see your 
CoCo perform as it never could before. 
II you don't agree that CoCo Max is the 
ultimate creative tool tor the Color Com 
puter, simplv return it within 20 davs for 
a Tull, courteous refund from Colorware, 

THE HARDWARE... 

This is the key to CoCo Max's unmatch- 
ed performance. Did you know the nor- 
mal joystick input built into the Color 
Computer only allows access to 4,096 (64 
\ 64) points on the CoCo screen? Yet, the 
Color Computers high resolution screen 



pad into this new input and you have a 
whole new kind of control. The dif- 
ference is remarkable 




has 49.152 (256 x m\ pixels. This means 
that a joystick, mouse or even a touch 
pad can, at best, only access about one 
tenth of the pixels on the CoCo screen. 

Most graphic programs ignore this hard- 
ware limitation of the Color Computer 
and give you only low-res control. 
Others attempt to overcome the limita* 




A DIGITIZER OPTION... 

We studied all the video digitizers 
available and picked the best of them to 
link with CoCo Max. The DS-69 from 
Micro Works was our choice. This op- 
tional device lets you capture the image 
from any video source (video recorder, 
camera^ etc.) on your Color Computer. 




extended Color Computer You'll n^d a 
Radio Shack or equivalent joystick, 
mouse or touch pad. Disk systems re- 
quire a Multi-Slot Interface or Y- 
Branching Cable. 

THE COMPLETE COCO MAX SYSTEM, 

with software on DISK $69.95 

with software on CASSETTE (Available 
Mar '85) *. $69.95 

YSRANCHING CABLE-li you have a disk 
system but do not have a Multi-Slot In- 
terface, use this economical 40-pin, 1 
male, 2 female cable to connect the 
CoCo Max Hi-Res input unit and your 
disk controller to your CoCo $2735 

Surry , COCO MAX is not compatible with JDOS 

vcolormZre 



TOLL FREE ORDER LINE: 
(800) 227-0916 

Colorware Inc. 
78-03F Jamaica Ave. 
Woodhaven, NY 11421 
(718) 647-2864 



ORDERING INFORMATION 

ADD £&OQ PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. 
CO.D.'S ADD $3.QQ EXTRA, 

SHIPPING AND HANDLING FOR CANADA IS $5.&& 
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTER CARD r AfO.5, CHECKS^ 
N.Y. RESIDENTS MUST ADD SALES TAX. 



1 



2450 B*= ,, L4CCEGL2.GL1D ,, 

2460 C*="LBDEL4FEDL1C" 

2470 D*="LBDEL4FEDL1C" 

2480 Q*=A*+B*+C*+A*+B*+D* 

2490 Q*<1)»"UPQ" 

2500 Q* < 8 ) - " POeUPQSPGePMEeTNPLZ " 

2510 GOSUB 37B0:GOSUB 3240 

2520 A*-"02LB. . .GLBDL16. . .L16DL1 

6...GL16AL2BG" 

2530 B*= " 03L8 . . . CLBC02L4G AL IB" 

2540 C*="LB. . .GLBDL16. . .GL16DL16 

. . .GL16AL2BLB. . .G" 

2550 D*="LBGLB...AL8AL4ABL1A" 

2560 E*«"LB. . . AL8AL16. . .G#L16AL1 

6. ..BL16AL2GD" 

2570 F*» " 03LB . . . CLBC02L 1 6 ... GL 1 6 

GL16. ..AL16AL1B" 

25B0 G*="LB. . . ELBF#L16. . . GL16F#L 

16. . . GL16EL2DLB. . . GLBALB. . . B03L8 

C02L4BL4AL2.G" 

2590 Q*(6)*A*+B*+C*+D* 

2600 Q*«E*+F*+G# 

2610 Q*<1)="SBJMSPBE" 

2620 Q* (B> -" JWF@CFFO@XPSLJOH@PO@ 

UIFeSBJMSPBE" 

2630 GOSUB 37B0: GOSUB 3240 



2640 A*="02L8AL4ALBAABALB. . . B-L4 

AL8AL4GLBGGFGLB. . . AL4FLBG" 

2650 B*="L4ALBAAGALB. . .B-03L4DLB 

DCCC02L8B-AGL8 . . . F " 

2660 Q*=A*+B* 

2670 Q*(1)="KPMMZ" 

2680 Q* < 8 ) - " GPSS I FTSBeKPMMZQHPPE 

SGFMMPX" 

2690 GOSUB 3780: GOSUB 3240 

2700 A*= " 02L4CCFGL2ALBFEL4DB-B-L 

2B-LBB-B-" 

2710 B*= " 03L2C02LBFFL4FEFL 1 GL4CC 

FGL2AL8FE" 

2720 C*="L4DB-B-L2B-L8B-B-LB. . . A 

L8GL4FEFGL1F" 

2730 D*= " 03L2 . C02L2B-L8 AGL 1 ALBCC 

L2FL8FF" 

2740 E*= "L4FEFL 1 GL4CCFGL2ALBFE " 

2750 F*="L4DB-B-L2B-LBB-B-LS. . . A 

LBGL4FEFGL1F" 

2760 Q*«A*+B*+C*+D*+E*+F* 

2770 Q*<1)*"IPNF" 

2780 Q* < 8 ) - " I PNFfiPOSU I FSSBOHF " 

2790 GOSUB 3780: GOSUB 3240 

2800 A*-"02L4DDAAL8BBBBL2A" 

2B10 B*="L4GGF#F#EEL2D" 




■/arffat/tO LjOll 



Just for you and your CoCo -DIGJnews 
for CoCo. 

DIGInews is a newsmagazine on tape 
(disk compatible). Includes industry and 
CoCo news, features, programs (geared to 
your needs through a unique 'modular' ap- 
proach), computer art, cartoons, and much 
more -even crossword puzztes. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

Pictcr Van der Breggen, 
Dragonfly Writings. 

•MODULAR « As a subscriber you get 
the basic news section. Then you choose 
your moduic(s). First module is included 
free -- Home & Family --Kids Only! ~ The 
Hobbyist — CoCo Business. 

*RATES are based on a single issue cost 
X10 for one year; X18 for two; X24 for 



atfo in J 1 U ' - 

UrLUngs 
- presents 



three years. You get two, six or twelve issues - 
FREE depending on the length ot your 
subscription to DIGInews for CoCo. 

Single issue rate is $6.95 for the basic 
news section PLUS one module. Second 
module, add $1.25; third, add $1 .00; and all 
four, add 75 cents. Basic +4, then would 
cost $9.95. 

♦DISCOUNT of 30% to April 30, 1985 
(postmarked); 25% to May 31, 1985; 20% 
toJune30, 1985; 15% to July 31, 1985; 10% 
to August 31, 1985. Discount valid ONLY 
on orders accompanied by payment (cheque 
or money-order). 

♦GUARANTEE - You may cancel your 
subscription at any time and receive the 
unused portion of your subscription back 
(basis: single rate; any discounts voided). 




MINIMUM 16K REQUIRED. ECB RECOMMENDED 



FOR FULL IMPLEMENTATION 




neus 

jorLaLo 



TAKE DISCOUNT OFF TOTAL IF ORDER 
ACCOMPANIED BY PAYMENT! (Circle One Only) 

ONE TWO THREE 

Year Years Years 

$6950 $125.10 $166.80 

82.00 147.60 196.80 

92.00 165.60 220.80 

99.50 179.10 238.80 

two six twelve 

Rates in US funds (Canadians please pay in CDN funds). U.S., 
Canada, as show; Mexico, add $10.00; all others add $25.00. 
1 have taken my discount and enclosed my cheque/money- order 
Bill me (1 understand this voids my discount). 
_Home& Family __KidsOnly! _The Hobbyist CoCo Business 

Name: „ , 





Single 


MODULE 


Issue 


DIGInews + 1 


$6.95 


DIGInews + 2 


8.20 


DIGInews + 3 


9.20 


DIGInews + 4 


9.95 


FREE Issues earned 


: - 



City:. 



Zip:_ 



Mail subscription to: DIGInews, P.O. Box 1340, Fort Qu'Appellc, 
Sask. CANADA S0G ISO. Phone (306) 332-4503 



\ S0G ISO. Phone (306) 332-4503. m 

Color Computer and CoCo2 are Trade Marks of Tandy Corporation 



I 

I 
I 

I 
J 



172 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



2B20 C*«"L4DLBDDL4AABLBBBLB...A" 

2830 D*» " LB AL4BLBGGF#F#F#F#L4ELB 

EEL2D" 

2B40 Q*=A*+B*+C*+D* 

2B50 Q*<1)*"CMBDL" 

2B60 Q* < 8 ) * " CBBeCBBeCMBDLQT I FFQ " 

2B70 GOSUB 37B0:BOSUB 3240 

2880 PLAY"T202" 

2B90 A*- " 02L 1 6 ... FL 1 6D0 1 L4B-02L4 

DFL2B-03L16. . . DL16C02L4B-DEL2F" 

2900 B*="LSFF03LB. . . DLBC02L4B-L2 

AL8GAL4B-B-FD01B-" 

29 1 G*» " 03LBDDL4DE-FL2FLBE-DL4C 

DE-L2E-" 

2920 D*-"L4E-LB. . . DLBC02L4B-L2AL 

8BAL4B-DEL2F" 

2930 E*= " L4FB-B-L8B- AL4BB803L4CL 

BE~DC02B-L4B-A" 

2940 F*«"LBFFLB. . . B-03LSCDE-L2F0 

2LBB-03CLB. * . DLBE-L4CG2L2B-" 

2950 Q* < 6 > -A*+B*+A*+B*+C* 

2960 Q*-D*+E*+F* 

2970 Q*<l)-"CBODFS" 

29B0 Q* ( B ) - " U I F@TUBSeTQBOHMFE@CB 

OOFS" 

2990 BOSUB 37B0: GOSUB 3240 

3000 A** " 02L4FL8FFL4FL8FFL4A03L8 

CG02L4AF" 

30 1 B*- " L4GLBGGL4GLBGGL4GL8BGL4 

EL4C" 

3020 C*="02L4FLBFFL4FLBFFL4A03LB 

CC02L4AF" 

3030 D*="03L4C02LBB-B-L4ABL4. . .F 

3040 Q*«A*+B*+C*+D* 

3050 Q*<15-"UFO" 

3060 Q* (B) -"UFOeMJUUMFGJOEJBOT" 

3070 GOSUB 37B0: GOSUB 3240 

3080 A*-"02LBALB. . . ALBBL4AF#DF#L 

B...AL8BL4AL2F#" 

3090 B*= " L8DF#L2 . ABL4GF#BL2E " 

3100 C*-"L4ELB. . .ELBF#L4EEC#EL8. 

. .GL8GL4GL2.B" 

3110 D*= " L4AAAL2AL4GL8 . . . F#L8EL4 

F#D" 

3120 Q*U)""CMPX" 

3130 G*<B)-"cHPxeuiFeNBoeppxo" 

3140 Q*=A*+B*+C*+D* 

3150 GOSUB 3780: BOSUB 3240 

3 1 60 A*» " 1 L 1 6 . . . B02L 1 6DLBBL4 ALB 

BOIL 16. . .B02L16DL8BLB. . .F#" 

3170 B*™"L16. . . CL16D03LBC02L4BL8 

AAGEL8. . .D" 

3180 C*»"L8EDG03C02BL4GL8AEF#L4G 

tl a 

3190 Q*»A*+B*+A*+C* 
3200 Q*(1)*"CBCZ" 



32 1 Q# ( 8 ) - " SPDLBCZFeCBCZ " 

3220 GOBUB 3780: GOSUB 3240 

3230 GOTO 4810 

3240 P-0:P— l:H-0:YX-0 

3250 P-P+1:H««H+ 1:0-0 

3260 IF P<0 THEN P-0 

3270 CLSP 

32B0 IF P»>8 THEN LET P-0:P-P-1 

3290 X*-LEFT* < Q* f H ) 

3300 T*(1)=LEFT*(Q*,H+1) 

3310 P*»MID*(T*<1) ,H+1) 

3320 IF P*-"#" OR P*«"-" THEN PL 

AY T$(l) :YX*»YX+1:G0T0 3460 

3330 IF MID*(X$,HKCHR*<65> THEN 

P-P-1:G0TQ 3250 
3340 IF MID*(X* f H) >CHR*<72) THE 
N P-P-1:B0T0 3250 
3350 PRINT«2,T*(2);T" "$U*<2> 

i'Ui 

3360 IF P>0 THEN 3410 

3370 CLS 

3380 PRiNT«230,T*(2)?" USE UP AR 

ROW"; 

3390 PRINTa294,U*(2);" USE RIGHT 

ARROW"; 
3400 FOR X=l TO 1B00:NEXT X 



GET QIM LINg 



For this Ion pries you receive onti 

Acoustic MODEM System 

Featuring; 

» 300bps org. tode (access all free BBS's and pay 
boards) 

» Coeiercial Quality Construction 

» COCO Serial Cable (installed, ready to plug 
in to your COCO) 

» Cassette containing FREE Seart Tereinal Soft 
ware so you can; Download PrograiSjNusic, 
Utilities, Pics, etc. and save thee to Disk or 
Tape (you get both versions with docuaentation) 

» View Color Braphic Screens Online (VIDTEX) 

» Print File Buffer And Here!! 

» Fits round and now square handsets 

These units are a special purchase f roe lease stock. 

They are supported by a 10 day no risk return policy 

and a 60 day warranty. Personal Checks Accepted. 

Send *45+$4 SIH, Honey Order or Cashier's Check, 

Illinois residents aust include $3.60 sales tax, 

for iaeediate shipasnt to: 

CRANBERRY INDUSTRIES 

7B01 B. 8T.L0UI8 

CHICASO It. 606S2 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 173 



m 



3410 YX=YX+1 

3420 IF YX=>15 THEN 4620 

3430 IF EX>7 THEN EX»0 

3440 CLSsPRINTa235,"N0TE";YX; 

3450 PLAY X* 

3460 S*^INKEY*iO=0+l 

3470 IF O«>20 THEN 3250 

3480 PRINTe2,T*(2);T;" "sU*(2 

>;U; 

3490 PRINT@453,"T0 END GAME PRES 

S (E) " ■ 

3500 IF S*="E" THEN 4810 

3510 IF S*=CHR*(94) THEN W*=T*(2 

):GOTO 3550 

3520 IF S*-CHR*(9) THEN W*=U*(2) 

:BOTO 3550 

3530 PRINTe2,T*(2);T;" ";U*<2 

) * U* 

3540 SOTO 3460 

3550 PRINTG228," NAME THAT TUNE 

";W*; 

3560 PRINT®288, 

3570 LINE INPUT T* 

3580 IF T*^"E" THEN 4810 

3590 P=1:F=0 

3600 F=INSTR(P,TS,Q*(1)) 

3610 IF F>0 THEN T*»Q* ( 1 ) : GOTO 3 

640 

3620 IF P>N THEN 3640 

3630 P-P+laGOTO 3600 

3640 IF S**CHR*(94) AND T*-Q* < 1 ) 

THEN LET LP-1/YX*1000: T-T+INT (LP 

) 

3650 IF S*=CHR*(9) AND T*=Q* < 1 ) 

THEN LET LP*1/YX*1000: U«U+INT (LP 

) 

3660 IF T*=Q*(1> THEN 4350 

3670 IF S*«CHR*(94) THEN LET LP= 

1/YX«1000iT-T-INT(LP> 

3680 IF S*-CHR*(9) THEN LET LP-1 

/YX*1000: U-U-INT (LP) 

3690 IF T<0 THEN TH3 

3700 IF U<0 THEN U*0 

3710 GOTO 3910 

3720 PLAY Q*(6):PLAY 0* 

3730 Q*(6)»"T2" 

3740 CLSiPRINTe232," PRESS ANY K 

EY"; 

3750 PRINTe2,T*(2);T!" "sU*<2> 
. y. 

3760 T*= INKEY*: IF T*""" THEN 3 

760 

3770 CLS: RETURN 

37B0 B*- " " ■ M*- " " : VV-0 ! N"LEN ( Q* ( 1 

)) * 

3790 CLS!PRINT®230,"ONE MOMENT P 

LEASE" 



3B00 W-W+l 

3B10 IF W=>N+1 THEN D*(1)=M*:RE 

TURN 

3B20 PRINT@2,T*(2);T;" ";U*(2 

) ■ U" 

3830 T*=LEFT* ( Q* ( 1 > , W ) 

3840 Z*=MID*(T*,W) 

3850 Z*«MID*(Z*,1) 

3860 IF W=>N+1 THEN 3880 

3870 QQ-ASC(Z*) 

3B80 IF QGN64 THEN Z*=CHR*(32) :B 

*=Z*:M*=M*+B*:GOTO 3800 

3890 Z*=CHR* (QQ-1 ) : M*=M*+Z*: GOTO 

3800 
3900 GOTO 3800 
3910 PMODE 3,1 
3920 PCLS 
3930 SCREEN 1,0 
3940 DRAW"S55C0;BM14,72"+WW* 
3950 AA*="S5;C0?BM+B,0" 
3960 DRAW AA#+RR* 
3970 DRAW AA*+QO* 
3980 DRAW AA#+NN# 
3990 DRAW AA*+GG* 
4000 B-50 

4010 PAINT(B,B0) ,2,0 
4020 B«B+28 

4030 IF B=106 THEN 4020 
4040 IF B*f>208 THEN 4070 
4050 IF B->190 THEN LET B=20B:GO 
TO 4010 
4060 GOTO 4010 
4070 B»16 

4080 PAINT(B,B4) ,0,0 
4090 IF B>177 THEN 4160 
4100 IF B=211 THEN LET B=210sGOT 
04080 

4110 IF B-177 THEN LET B=196:G0T 
4080 

4120 IF B=152 THEN LET B=177:G0T 
4080 

4130 IF B-107 THEN LET B- 137: GOT 
04080 

4140 IF B»61 THEN LET B»92:G0T0 
4080 

4150 B=B+15:G0T0 4080 
4160 PAINT(210,86) ,0,0 
4170 PAINT<82,74) ,3,0 
41B0 B-132 

4190 PAINT(B,74> ,3,0 
4200 IF B>200 THEN 4220 
4210 B=B+24:G0T0 4190 
4220 PAINT (81, 95) ,0,0 
4230 PAINT (81, B5) ,3,0 
4240 PAINT(122,95) ,3,0 
4250 PAINT(222,84) ,3,0 
4260 PAINT(222,95) ,3,0 



m 



174 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



' .Wflw. ■ ■ ■ . ■ . ' .'. ' .'I ' ff www w 1 1 h i i i JJ '»Tff!ffre????7? 





CINC PAC — Battle of Midway 32K 

Ark Royal's masterpiece game of naval strategy of perhaps the most im- 
portant battle in the history of the United States Navy. Hi Res graphics, 
75% machine language allows player to control as many as 41 separate 
units on the screen at one time. Command Task Forces 16 & 17 as they 
play cat and mouse with the Japanese fleet. Maneuver the Hornet, 
Yorktown and Enterprise into the best position. Set courses and launch 
search and attack aircraft then hope for the best. Find the enemy fleet, 
then pick the targets: Akagi, Soryu, Kaga, Yamato and others in this 
historically accurate game. Relive history, Admiral, and it won't be any 
easier this time around. Anchors Aweigh. 

Game save. Requires disk version to operate on disk. Cassette. $27.95. 



COMPANY COMMANDER 32K 

Game module 1 — House to House. Ark Royal's squad level WWII 
infantry combat game, 

they said it couldn't be done — a SQUAD LEVEL wargame on a com- 
puter — but we've done it. The Line of Sight problem is licked — and the 
machine language routines really speed things up. 
Game Module #1 comes with House to House map and 10 + sceneries 
involving infantry combat in Aachen, Caen, Arnheim, Stalingrad and 
other famous WWII city battlegrounds. Combat units include rifle 
squads, mortar teams, machine gun crews, engineers, and more 
(depending on the scenerio chosen), leaders, vehicles and other 
weaponry of WWII. Unique design allows incorporation of future 
expansion modules. 
Choose campaign play and put yourself on the battlefield, Corporal 
Smith or Jones; collect points toward promotion. Order up smoke from 
the mortar squad, HE for those dug in units. Take the objective and you 
might make Major someday. Just don't step on a land mine. 

Comes with House to House game map, more than 10 scenarios, on 2 cassettes, or all on 1 disk. .,$29.95. (Disk included.) 




BATTLE OF THE BULGE 32K 

Ark Royal's 1 or 2 player game by the author of Battle For Tunis, Bulge recreates 
operation Wacht Am Rhein, Hitler's last desperate gamble of WWII. In none of our 
games is the fog of war so apparent than in BULGE. You know the Germans have 
attacked in the Ardennes, but little else. What is their strength? Their objective? 
Who do you send to repair the huge gap in the American lines? What bridges do 
you blow? Can you protect the fuel depots? Where are all those Tigers coming 
from? When will the weather clear? 

Historically accurate, and a real challenge whether it be against the computer or 
a friend. (Just don't humiliate him too badly.) A game you've been waiting for. 
Cassette $25.95. 



OTHER ARK ROYAL GAMES.. 

Some at reduced prices! 



Waterloo 32K 

(Mar '84)* $22.95 

Guadalcanal 32K $24.95 

Battle For Tunis . $24.95 

Kamikaze 32K 

(Apr '83)* $19.95 

Kamikaze 16K $14.95 



Denotes Rainbow review 
month 



Across the Rubicon 32K 

(Feb '84)* $24.95 

Across the Rubicon 16K 

(Dec '82)* $14.95 

Mission: Empire 32K 

(Oct '82)* $22.95 

Mission: Empire 16K* $17.95 

Galactic Taipan 32K 

(May '84)* $17.95 

Starblazer 32K 

(Apr '84)* $17.95 

Bomber Command 16K 

(Jan '84)* $22.95 

ARK ROYAL GAMES 

P.O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 
904-786-8603 



Prices on all games Include shipping. Florida Residents add 5% tax. All games 
available on disk, add $3.00. All programs shipped within 24 hours regardless of check 
or money order. We pay shipping to U.S. and Canada. Others add 10%. Dealer in- 
quiries invited. COD's accepted. All Programs require Color ComPuterTM (Tandy 
Corp) or TDP System 100 ComPuterTM (RCA). 




4270 PAINT<28,95) ,3,0 
42B0 PAINTC44,95> ,3,0 
4290 SS*="Ti02LBF#F#LB. . . ALBF#L4 
F#ALBF#A03L4DL8. . .C#02LBBL4BA" 
4300 PLAY SS* 
4310 PLAY"T2" 

4320 CLS: PRINTQ235, "NEXT NOTE" 
4330 FDR X-l TO 5501 NEXT X 
4340 BOTO 3250 
4350 PMODE 3,1 
4360 POLS 
4370 SCREEN 1,0 
4380 DRAW " S4 ; BM4 , 68 ; " +CC* 
4390 BB*»"BM+B,0s" 
4400 DRAW BB*+00$ 
4410 DRAM BB*+RR* 
4420 DRAW BB*+RR* 
4430 DRAW BB*+EE* 
4440 DRAW BB*+CC* 
4450 DRAW BB*+TT* 
4460 YY=0:X=0sBB-36 
4470 GOSUB 4520 
4480 PAINT <B,C),X(1),0 
4490 X-X+lsB-B+BB 
4500 IF X-XX THEN YY-YY+1: X«0: ON 
YY GOTO 4530,4540,4550,4560,457 
0,4580,4590,4600,4610 
4510 GOTO 4480 

4520 B=20: C=70: XX=7: X ( 1 ) =3: RETUR 
N 

4530 
4540 
4550 
44B0 
4560 
4570 
4580 
4590 
4600 
4610 
4620 
4630 
E"; 

4640 B*»"":M*» 
) ) 

4650 
4660 



B-6:C=71:X<1)=0:GOTO 44B0 
B-20 1 C-74 : X < 1 ) -2 : GOTO 4480 
B«66: XX-3: C-78: X U > -0: GOTO 

B=92:X(1)=3:G0T0 44B0 
B=164:XX=2:C«B6:G0T0 44B0 
B=24:G0T0 4480 
B«94sX(l)=0:GOTO 4480 
XX=lsB=234:G0T0 4480 
GOTO 3720 
PRINT 
PRINTS230,"ONE MOMENT 



PLEAS 



W«0:M=LEN<Q*<B 



THEN Q*(8)=M*:G0 



Z*-MID*< 



B 



W=W+1 
IF W«>M+1 
TO 4710 

4670 T*»LEFT* ( Q* ( 8 ) , VV ) 
T*,W>:Z*-MlD*(Z*,l> 
4680 QGNASC(Z*> 

4690 IF QQ-64 THEN Z*=CHR*(32> 
*=Z*:M*«M*+B*:GOTO 4650 
4700 Z*=CHR* < QQ- 1 ) : M*=M*+Z* : GOTO 

4650 
4710 CLS:PRINTe200,"T I M E U 
P" 

176 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



4720 PRINT@297,"THE TUNE IS" 

4730 PRINT 

4740 PRINTQ*(B) 

4750 PLAY Q* 

4760 CLS 

4770 T*-INKEY* 

47B0 PRINTQ227,"PRESS ENTER FOR 

NEXT SONG" 

4790 IF T*-CHR*(13) THEN RETURN 

4800 GOTO 4770 

4810 CLS 

4B20 PRINTe72,"GAME FINISHED" 

4830 PRINTQ136, "final score" 

4840 PRINTQ200,T*(2) j" ";T 

4850 PRINTe232,U*(2);" "jU 

4860 C*-"GONGR ADULATIONS" 

4870 FOR X-l TO 3000: NEXT X 

4880 IF U>T THEN 4920 

4890 IF T>U THEN 4950 

4900 CLS:PRINT@236,"TIE SAME" 

4910 GOTO 4970 

4920 CLS : PR I NT@22B , C* ; " " 5 U* ( 2 > 

4930 PRINT@300,"YOU WIN" 

4940 GOTO 4970 

4950 CLS:PRINTe228,C*j" H jT*(2) 

4960 PRINTe300,"YdU WIN" 

4970 PLAY Q* 

4980 T*=INKEY* 

4990 PRINT@41B,"WANT TO PLAY AGA 

IN <Y)/(N>?" 

5000 IF T*="Y" THEN 20 

5010 IF T*«"N" THEN CLS: END 

5020 GOTO 4980 




lll^i^KHiSii^WiiWiiiii^i^DRAw' 1 

BMl 1$ , 5J3 ; S8R9D2NL9G1 



r(115,6p),3,j3:A 



$=»03L8EGL4GL8FAL4ALlj3BBL8BAB" : P 
LAY»L403DL802B03DDDCEP35E;L1^EEF 
'#;L8F#EF#G03AL4BL802B03DDDCEL 



nMHlW£$ ; 04CDL4E ;-. 

ll^Bi^^^Bfti|SaiiMiii : : "■■ 



81IP C.MacKem 



WmSg-Tqpeld, Alberta 



§p!^^^ sent copies 

IHfel^^ Rainbow 




Glenn Thibert 

Picture 

Glenn used basic with techniques found 

in the January 1985 issue of rainbow's 

"Wishing Well" by Fred Scerbo, 




Ana Landa Hutchison 

Gremlin 

Ana drew this portrait of "Stripe" using 

Graphicom. 



178 THE RAINBOW June 1985 




David Casuscelfi 

Crue 

David drew this using Basic's drrw and 

LINE commands. He is a freshman at 

Drury Senior High School in North 

Adams, Mass. 



Greg Juby 
Spaceface 

Greg drew this in basic using DRAW 

commands and has been programming 

on his CoCo for three years. 




Send your entry on either tape or disk to 



CoCo Gallery 
THE RAINBOW 
P.O. Box 385 
Prospect, KY 40059 
Attn: Monica Dorth 



Be sure to send a cover letter with your name, address 
and phone number detailing how you created your picture 
(what programs you used t etc.), how to display it and a 
few facts about yourself. 

Please don't send us anything owned by someone else; 
this means no game screens, digitized images from TV 
programs or material that's already been submitted 
elsewhere, 

We will award a first prize of $25, a second prize of $15 
and a third prize of $10. Honorable mentions also will be 
given. 



June 1965 THE RAINBOW 179 



RAINBOW 



Gjvb us your best: Join the ranks of these courageous CoCoists in showing the Color Computer world 
your high score at your favorite micro-diversion. We want to put your best effort on record in THE rainbow's 
Scoreboard column. All entries must be received 60 days prior to publication. Entries should be printed 
— legibly — and must include your full name, address, game title, company name and, of course, your 
high score. Each individual is limited to three score entries per month. Send your entries to Scoreboard, 
c/o the RAINBOW. + Current Record Holder 



60.710 
57.410 

41.335 
40.030 



740*0 
543-0 
464-0 
460 



6,450 
7,200 
5,220 

a r eoo 



AN DRONE (Radio Shack) 

61,660 •John Beeler, Columbia, MO 

Philippo Valiee, Si. Raymond. Quebec 
Daphnie Phillips, EvanStfllie. Wf 
Ryan Devlin, LouFSVille, KV 
Matthew W. Swadiing. North 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
ASTRO BLAST (Mark Date) 

20.575 •Tom Neal . Wabash , I N 
15,600 jQMph Dehn, Tucson AZ 

BASEBALL (Radio Shack} 

1 .409-0 * rad W idd u p, undas. Ontario 
Daniel Belisle, Montreal, Quebec 
Kevin Cornell Green town, IN 
Dave Fisher. Bt Downey. CA 
Walter Train lips, Janes* tlte, wi 
BATS AND BUGS (THE RAINBOW) 

24 600 •Michael Rosenberg, Preston burg, KV 
Bin Martin, Myrtle Boocn SC 
Lezlee Bishop, Salt Lake City. UT 
Brian Cook. Di*on, IL 
Apollo Laiham, Rich Square, NC 
BIRDS (Tom Mix) 

1 47.200 •Scott Bum &, C o I u m bi a t SC 
103,525 Luc Soucy, Baker- 8 rook, 

New Brunswick 
BLACKBOARD'S ISLAND {Tom M/jrJ 

54 *Chns Gope. Central, SC 
66 Mikel Rice, Panama City, FL 

blackjack (Radio Shack) 

12 501 •Steven A Hen, SharpSburg, MD 
BLACK SANCTUM (Mark Date) 

485 * Phi I & At Ison BI I (on i , Uncasler , PA 
BLOC HEAD fGomptttarwar*) 

4 1 ,975 * Mien ae-L Hebb , V i ctoria. Austral i a 
23 ,500 Pasc h al W i Ison. Kentwoad, LA 

BUSTOUT (Radio Shack) 

42,895 •Steven Roth. Fannystelle. Manitoba 
14.758 Amir ij&*. Winnipeg, Manitoba 

13,000 Ken Dewitt. Blue bland, IL 

CAN VON CLIMBER (Radio Shack ) 

162,500 AMtchael SHeo Jr .. Glenrtale, NY 
CAVERN COPTER (THE RAINBOW) 

1,245 *Sean Conner, Summit. NJ 

Doug Schwartz, Giendate, AZ 
Michael Mefterd. Wren. OH 
Joseph Galea terra, ftidgewood. NY 
John Rivers, North Adams, MA 
CHAMBERS ( Fom Mtx) 

69.100 *Blossom Mayor, East GreenbuSh, NV 
CHAMELEON (Compijtefwara} 

55 , BOO * Brian Wol fgram , F reela nd . M I 
CHOPPER STRIKE (MiChTron) 

262,900 •Dan Hopper, Omaha, NE 

Andrew Noma. Mississauga. Ontario 
Michael Hebb, Victoria. Australia 
Andrew Figel. Sardis, OH 
Benny PI schfce, Lloyd minster 
Saskatchewan 
CHUCKIE EGG (A&P) 

39 1 , 670 * Pau I Hotz , Herat ia. 1 srael 
255. 1 40 Laura Hotz . H erzi I a . I sraei 

CLIMB ['Cfrromasettej 

20,050 *Neil Haupt, G ration, OH 
CLOWNS ■ BALLOONS f Radio Shack) 

1 2& r 1 AKaren Tracy, Covenl ry , R I 
COLOR BASEBALL (Radio Shack j 

668-0 •Christian Roch Granby Quebec 
Chris Reynolds, Richmond, KV 
Rob Mowery, Robinson. PA 
Bart Ankrom Atlanta, KS 
Chuck Carroll, Suisun City, CA 
JeHery Chubey, Roseau River, 

Manitoba 
Craig Dunne, Windsor, Ontario 
Jonathan Baker, Harmony, NC 
Rhett Bagnall, Saskatoon, 
Saskatchewan 



1,213 
968 
963 
790 



194,600 
167.600 
102.400 
130,200 



254-0 
2500 
15B-0 
135-0 
70-0 

93-1 

7G-3 



COLOR BLAST rCfteltencerJ 

200,250 *Richard Fiore, Clemson, SC 
COLOR CAR (NQVASQfT) 

154.600 •Scott Cunningham, East Lyme, CT 
130,483 Dan Bouges, NiantiC. CT 

COLORPEDE f/nrraco'OrJ 
1 fj.tf) 1 ,05 1 * M ark Sfn I m , Santa Ana , C A 
5.758,508 Scott Obertioltzer, Lexington, MA 

3.355.248 Scott Drake. Pine City, NV 

2,614,230 Jerry Petk&sh. War ran. M) 

2 , 547 .299 Rlc h M cGervey , Mo rg ante wn , W V 

COSMIC CLONES (Mark Data) 

1 9,850 * Darren T&lhc-I. Hawkesftury . 
Nova Scotia 
CRASH fTom Mi* J 

13,300 * David Craft, Roanoke, VA 
CRUISING (SuhShihB) 

3,002 * La ura Hotz, Harzlig, Israel 
DALLAS OOEST (Radio Shack) 

ai •Maggie Budewitz. St Paul, MN 
99 John Atlocca, Yonkers, NV 

125 Herbert Patterson, Largo, Fi 

DEMOLITION DERBY (Radio Shack} 

106,400 ADavid Oelhaupi, Calgary^ Alberta 
79,100 David Close, Spring Held, V A 

d4,000 Joseph DBhn, Tucson, AZ 

32,900 Les Dorn, Eau Claire, WI 

DEMON It (THE RAINBOW) 

12,475 •Rhett Bagnall. Saskatoon 
Saskatchewan 
Frank Canepe III, Santurce, 

Puerto Rico 
Bryan Ecker, Lusoy, MD 
DEVIL ASSAULT fTom Mix) 
4 , 7 73, 1 40 *H usker Le Gau It , A royie , n v 
DOODLEBUG {Com^uterwareJ 

325.370 •Susa n Ball! nger, U * bridge , Ontario 
DOUBLE BACK (Radio Shack) 

235, 1 1 * Les Corn . Eau Clfli re . W I 

Rachel Soldan. Qresham, OR 
Laurence Zatran, Wew Vork, NY 
Luc Soucy. Baker- BrOOk. 
New Brunswick 
DOWN LAND (Radio Shack) 
20,000.400 +Adam Pateraen, Port (and, OR 
Alain Cyr, Valcouri, Quebec 
Jeamne McCuen, Rutland. MA 
Laurence Zatran, Mew York. NY 
Shannon Biakey. Columbia, MO 
Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 
Thomas Audas M, Fremont, CA 
Amos Goldle 
DRACONIAN fTom Mix) 

460,540 4Lane Dswhirsl, Counanay, 
British Columbia 
ELECTRON (Tom Mix) 

35 , 225 * Vernon Johnson, Pa rkv I II a, M D 
24,715 Daniel Bee. Flint, Ml 

FAN GM AN fTom Mix) 

1 55 , 225 #Oan iet Thorn pson, St , Lo uis, M O 
FOODWAR (ArcadQ Ammtitton) 

151.070 *Mathleu Paquin, Brassard, Quebec 
1 47 .645 M att Grill Ith s . St i I wet I , KS 

1 1 6,000 C h ns Co pe , Cent ra\ r SC 

1 04.075 Mike Schart, Fremont, OH 

94,905 Stephana Asselin, Baie Comeau. 

Quebec 
FOOTBALL (Radio Shack) 

76-0 ^Steven Allen, Sharpsburg, MD 
THE FROG (Tom Mix} 

6,690 *Mika Dodge. Jackson, Ml 
FROGGER (Comsoft) 

1 2,000 A N i cole Freed man , Wei I esley , MA 
FROGGIE (SpQCtfai Associates) 

1 1 2.120 *Oavid Oeihaupl. Calgary, Alberta 
108,490 Bill I do. Newark. QE 

FURY (MicbTron) 

406, 700 *R ussell La pe^e , N e w O rl sans, LA 



10,075 
1,600 



211,790 
43.100 
19,650 



66,345 
66.145 
47,632 
46.031 
44,143 
40,712 
17,580 



191.280 


Mario Peitetier, Sle-Fay, Quebec 


132,200 


Dennis Martin, Chalmette, LA 


1 13,700 


Bernd P ruoiting, Scheibenhardl, 




West Germany 


107.760 


Chris Datje, Oanbury, CT 


GALAGON ( Spacttai Associates) 


135 T 18fl 


*Mano Asseim Baie-Comeau Quebec 


7S,fl30 


Tom Neal, Wabash, IN 


GRABBER (Tom Mix) 


149,350 


• Craig Webster, Argyle, NY 


142,300 


Paul MecArthur, Gillett WI 


130,450 


Daniel Ballsle, Montreal, Quebec 


109,100 


StepNm ^amonski. Ewing, NJ 


GRAN PRIX iGomputerware) 


3,336 


• Paschal Wilson, Kent wood, LA 


2,610 


Jocko Valentino. Timonium, MD 


GUARDIAN j Quasar J 


1,005 


• Mike Dodge. Jackson, Ml 


HEIST (THE RAINBOW) 


2,100 


•Chris Reynolds, Richmond. KY 


2.100 


• Sergio Waigser, Mexico City, Mexico 
Susan Baliinger, UKbridga, Ontario 


1,500 


1,500 


Julio Comeflo. Scarborough. Ontario 


1,500 


Kirstie Compton, Suffield, CT 


1,500 


Gary Greaser, Argyle, NY 


1,500 


Andy Dater, Med lord. OR 


1,500 


David Figel, Sardis, OH 


1,500 


Diego Gal Una, Summit, NJ 


1,500 


Tim Hoven, EckvUle, Alberta 


1,500 


Joel Lombard), Newark, DE 


1,500 


Jeff Roberg, Wlnfield, KS 


1.500 


Brendan Smith, Coral Spnngs. FL 


1.500 


Kevin Speight. Bridgewater, 




Nova Scotia 


1,500 


Rupert Young, Sheffield. MA 


THE INTERPLANETARY FRUIT FLY (THE RAINBOW) 


37,000 


•Scott Perkins, Pon Orange, fl 


27,500 


Las Dom, Eau Claire, WI 


26,000 


Eric Foss, Cochrane, Albena 


25,500 


MIcheleGaboriault, Foxboro, MA 


25.000 


Andrew Battels, Sulphur, OK 


20,000 


Joe Calcalarra, RlrJgewoort, NY 


17,000 


Susan Bellinger, UKbridge. Ontario 


12,500 


Michael Siieo Jr., Olendale, NV 


10,000 


Kirk Carter, Cooper City. FL 


THE JUNGLE fTHE RAHYBOW) 


663,590,000 


•Jeff Lawrence, Cambridge. Ontario 


459, 35 1, 04 1 


Denise Morin, Hudson, MA 


4560.144 


Jon Hobson, Plainfietd, WI 


4.1W.0O0 


Brandon Duncan, Benton, KS 


29,452 


ScqU Beliman. Deveoport. IA 


JUNIORS REVENGE (Computerwara) 


6,020,000 


• Ian Stewed. Lynwpod. Perlh-Austraiia 


766,300 


Richard Wiseman, Marion, OH 


36.200 


Siephane Aasetin, Baie-Comaau. 




Quebec 


JUNKFOODII 


1,079600 


•Jean-Francois Morin, Lormievitle. 




Quebec 


357,040 


Larry Thomson, Menominee, Ml 


309,460 


Shirli?y Blatk, Qmnlrjn, AL 


206.940 


Rhett Bagnatl, Saskatoon, 




Saskatchewan 


198.200 


Sheila Bigel, Massapequa, NV 


72.640 


Michael Chambarlrn, Dawson Creek, 




British Gotumbie 


40,750 


Vernon Johnson, Parkvilie, MD 


KEY BOMBER (THE RAINBOW) 


29,052 


•Tony Boring, Armagh, PA 


THE KING (Tom Mix) 


1,670,900 


•Yolanda Farr, Say re, PA 


1,003,400 


Tim Rueb, Atlanta, GA 


337,800 


Ki<k Carter, Cooper City. Fi_ 


300,000 


Larry Cowles_ Westpont, WA 


241,200 


Chris McKernan, Chateau guay 




Quebec 


78.600 


Craig Crowe. Summerville, SC 



*••••*•*••****•••••••••••••••••••••••: 



180 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



L***********************************Vf** 




KLEHDATHU ( Radio Shack) 

937.675 +Dan Fran/en, Westlake, OH 
927 ,727 Doug Franzen t Wealtake, OH 

902,510 Les Dom, Eau Claire. Wl 

728,076 L Grant SHdeler, Lakewood, CO 

312,980 Alfred SJlVft. Cranston, Rl 

LANCER {Spectra} Associates) 

165,750 AGIenn Dollck. Builington, Ontario 
1 62, 300 Bryan Bel I . Sou th Lyon , M I 

152,25" Ryan Morrison, South Lyon, Ml 

144.000 Robbie McDaniel, Ruthertordlon, NO 

1 3B, 500 Ted Bark ley. Wh I teha H . NY 

117,150 Bill Stray, Tucson. AZ 

111.950 Hans Grinkmann. Burlington, Ontario 

50.900 JeM Beyer, Apollo. PA 

55.B00 Kirk Carter. Cuoper City, FL 

LASERWORM & FIREFLY (THE RAINBOW) 

13,83d ADaan McWhorter. Argyie, NY 
LUNAR ROVER PATROL ( Spec t rat Associate) 
185,050 AMark Jensen, Franklin, Wl 
1 79,350 Thomas Green, Natch©*, MS 

170, BOO Jeremy Moan, ChristchurctL 

New Zealand 
79,950 Paul Hote, Herzlia, »«raeF 

76,960 Mike Rebbecchi, Somerdaie. NJ 

MADNESS ft THE MINOTAUR {Radio Shack) 
220 * Robbie Sablomy, Ml. Zion, IL 

MAZE LAND (CtiFOfTiASOTte) 

& L 550 A Brian Cook, Dixon, IL 
MEGA BUG (Radio Shack} 

1 0B5 * Larry Cowles, Westport, WA 
METEORS tSp&atrat Associates) 

33.200 APaschal Wilson, KentwOQd, LA 
MICROBES fPrtto Shack) 

237,560 ATudd Battels, Coal Valley, IL 
170,550 April I q La I ham, Rlah Square NC 

144,350 Theodore Latham, J r . Rich Square. NC 

98 ,460 K en t J ak way . Ga r ret I . I N 

77,300 David Barnekow, Eikhorn, Wl 

MISSILE BARRAGE (THE RAINBOW) 

2-1 AJoa Calcaterra. Ridge wood, NY 
MONSTER MAZE f Radio Shack} 

205, 1 80 * Richard Flora, Clemson, SC 
200,020 Terry SI eale . S u m me rtiold. NC 

200,000 Jason Palfrey. Germanlowri, TN 

1 1 5,1 30 Theodore Latham Jr., Rich Square, NC 

33.470 Brett Ankrom, Atlanta, KS 

MR. DJG r Comparer ware J 
3,259,750 * Ell an Bal linger, U* bridge, Ontario 
3,100,850 Biagm D< Lorenzo. Montreal, Quebec 

3,00 1.100 Ross & Da n I el Mah i ma n , Todd Boeh m , 

Nashville, TN 
2,875,870 Ann-Marie MacKay, Pori Hardy. 

Bntlsh Columbia 
2,520,050 Thomas Henry, 6oca Raton, FL 

2,038.250 Mario Asselin, Baie- Comea u, Quebec 

MUDPIES (MichJrOn) 

265,000 * Stephen Zamonski, Ewing, NJ 
249,800 Brian Woltgram, Free land, Ml 

137,000 David Craft, Roanoke, VA 

114.800 Barry Stanton, North East, PA 

NINJA WARRIOR ( Programmer's Guild} 

42 1 .900 * Ch rls R eynolds, R i ch monrJ , KY 
OFFENDER / American Business Computers} 
289,300 AChrisUne Leonard, MkiOnfl, NV 
t37,500 B.J McDonald, Mint HNI, NC 

OUTHOUSE (MichTron) 

7 ,001 * Luc So ucy, Bak er- B rook , 
New Brunswick 
PENGUIN (THE RAIN BOW) 

48, 250 * Pa u I Wagorn , Carp , Ontario 

13,920 Michael Chamberlin, Dawson Creek, 

British Columbia 
1 1 , 5fi0 David Ba rl m ess , Fayeltev I He, PA 

1 1 ,620 Michael Sileo Jr., Giendale, NY 

1 0,790 Wick K assel . A ppleton . Wl 

10.320 Joe Calcaterra, flidgewood, NY 

PHANTOM SLAYER f Med Systems) 

1 ,32© * S usa n Ba I II nger , Ux bridge, Ontario 
PI MB ALL (Radio Shack) 

200,712 ifrTbomag Audas II, Fremont. CA 
PIPELINE (THE RAINBOW) 

1.332 #Kem Prehn. Carol Stream, IL 
1.162 M i ke Ga rozzo , Mor n s v i 1 1 e, P A 



925 An dy Q reen L W hit ehal I, PA 

463 Susan Bellinger, Ux bridge, Ontario 

405 Joe Blronas, Crest wood KY 

PLACET INVASION (Spectra* Assoc^ate^ 
59 ,600 ATe r ry Steele, Sum me rfl eld. N C 
32,350 Susan Ballinger. Utf bridge, Ontario 

10,750 Saul Kirsch, Ra'anana. Israel 

6,950 Michael Derm an, Tel -Aviv, Israel 

POLARIS (Radio Shack} 

171,862 #Thomag Levasssur, Rockland, ME 
1 33, 7 28 Ed Meyer , Vancou v e t . Bri tieb Columbl a 

1 1?,5:i5 Brett Ank 10m , Atlanta, KS 

67.910 Ron Sujkowski, Bay City. Ml 

62,566 Bart Ankrom, Atlanta, KS 

POLTERGEIST (Radio Shack) 

4h 665 *Fra n k Canepa III, Banturco, 

Puerto Rico 
4 ,630 Lisa Bal I i nger, Uxb ridge , O ntario 

4,200 Bryan Ecker. Lusby, MO 

3,740 Tina Hurst Lake Cily, FL 

POO YAH fDatasott) 
1 .546.000 AJflff Cdnnall, Winona, MN 
1,250,350 Richard Hawkins, Cleveland, TN 

900,250 Daniel Bel Isle, Montreal. Quebec 

194,600 Helena Gilbert. RDuyrt-NornnrJA. 

Quebec 
106,100 Tom Neal, Wabash. IN 

97,900 Ellen Ballinger, Ux bridge, Ontario 

60 , 1 00 Steven N ud al man. Brookly n , N Y 

70,000 Jfimie Carlson, Glencoe, MN 

7 1 ,900 Lau ra Hotz , Herjl tg p I srael 

POPCORN (ftadJ0 5tac*J 

45,210 *Mlke Norns, Columbia, SC 
41,910 Nicole Freedman, Wellesley, MA 

36,500 Barry Stanton, North East, PA 

30,100 Craig Gordon, Philadelphia, PA 

28,810 Steven Roth. Fannystelle, Manitoba 

24,S10 Mark Carpentier. Dunfermline, IL 

2 1 , 1 30 Abby Gordon , Ph rladel ph ia , f* A 

PROJECT NEBULA (Radio Shack} 

2,010 *Dan Heater, Cortland, OH 
1.705 Ken Krejca, Chicago, IL 

1 , 540 Ti m R ueb, Ada nte, G A 

535 Joseph Dehn r Tucson. AZ 

485 Jett Kiisdonk. Milwaukee. Wl 

O-NERD (THE RAINBOW) 
1 .958,950 * Bruce Baltier, Hanover. Ontario 
61.290 Sean Conner. Sumrrm. NJ 

QUEST (Aardvart) 

5,720, B75 #Mlke Cookj Phoenix, A2 
QUlXfTbmMfJO 

907,320 * An drew Nome, Missiasauga. Ontario 
323,373 Jean-Francois Lauzier, Asbestos, 

Quebec 
27 1 ,£65 N icole Freed man. Wei Fas I bv. MA 

107.5&S Stephana AmbIitt, Bais-Comeau 4 

Quebec 
l-TU (Radio Shack} 
50 ^EHen Ballinger. Uxbridge, Ontario 
50 *F*rth Barnett, Syracuse, NY 
50 *Scott Bellman. Davenport. I A 
50 *Jetf Brock, Fl Lauderdale, FL 
50 *Mike Bubb, Grafton, OH 
50 * Mi ke Cam ae n, Fo 1 ransb&e . wv 
50 * Brett Casteef, Russelt, PA 
50 *Chrjs Chamberlin, Oawson Creek, 

Brilish Columbia 
50 * Chr is Cope , Can tral , SC 
50 +Jeff Diggs. St. Louis. MO 
50 *Aarqn Flaugher, Hamilton, QH 

50 *flichard Gain, Tyter, TIC 
50 itJerome Galba, Rochester, Ml 
50 *John Kidd. Clarksboro, NJ 
50 ABarney Laverly, Qauley Bridge. WV 
50 * Jason Morrison, Spruce Grove, 

Alberta 
50 * O avid Oeinau pi , Cai ga ry Ai berta 
50 *Robbie Sabiotny, Mt Zion. IL 
50 *Michaei Thomas, Flint, Ml 
40 Bart A nfc ro m r A I la n ia. KS 

4fl Diavid Bryan, Kent wood, LA 

40 Jeff Dempeey, Eaton vi He, WA 

30 Bryan Canterbury N RJdgeuJHa, OH 

25 Ryan Devlin. Louisville, KY 



25 Joel F laugher, Hamilton, OH 

25 Patrlc F laugher, Hamilton, Oh 

20 Rufia Aii I d . S t. Peter SbU rg . F L 

RACEft(THE RAINBOW) 

150© ifcFrankCanepaill.Santurce, 

Puerto Bico 
90 ,2 Ch rla Neal , Wabash , 1 N 

RADIO BALL i Radio Shack} 
d,510,7JO #Les Dorn, Eau Claire. Wl 
3, 708 ,8^0 Slephen Zamonsk i .. E wing , N J 

1,738,159 Ml ckey Emberton , Ind isnapoUft, I N 

1,511,840 Kelly Dion, Cap-de-la-Madelaine, 

Quebec 
1,230,300 Melvin Sharp, Baltimore, MD 

1,207.240 Nick Kessel. Applelon. Wl 

RETURN OF THE JET-I f Ttiuntlw Vision} 
536,43? +Matt Qntfiths, StiiwolK KS 
429 1 1 60 J ean- F rancois Bru neau , St-H ubert 

Quebec 
ROAD RACE (THE RAINBOW) 

91,7 *Bffl Martin, Myrtle Beech, SC 
576 G Eric Clarkfion. Mia&nuri City, TX 

70fi 1 Michael Hebb, Victoria, Australia 

12124 Michaet Marter&. Wau^eu. Wl 

21 SB 5 Steven Rrjlh Fennys1ell», Manitoba 

ROBOTTACK rmrracotorj 
7,526,100 *MikeSchBrf,Fremont,OH 
4,648.489 C r y So per 8 Ed w i n P rath e I , 

Oxnard. CA 
3.364.100 Wade ft Troy Woods. Paul MacLennen. 

Tiverton, Ontario 
2 .5 1 6,050 H or ace HamJ Iton , Calgary. Alben a 

2.2 1 6 ,950 Ran dy Hank ins , Tabo r , I A 

SAILOR MAH (Tom Mix) 

535.900 *ScotT Sherman. Woodstown NJ 
4ftfl,600 Paul Kenyan. PhuenfA, AZ 

435.700 Andy Oaler, MedtOrd. OR 

418, [>00 Sally Neumann, HaiJay. ID 

309,300 Jafl Picketts, Brentford, Ontario 

360,700 Joel Lange, Windsor, CT 

32S.00O Jetf Dinger, Edgawood. UD 

16B.500 Brian Ruber son, Collinsville, IL 

SANDS OF EGYPT (Radio Shack) 

60 *John Allocca, Yonkers, NY 
82 Jef t McKay, T ra v is A F B, C A 

96 Aaron Durkee, Landing, Ml 

198 Bob Mazzola, Freeh otd, NJ 

SCARF MAN rCom$or7,r 

260.200 A Amy Prehn, Carol Stream, IL 
SEA DRAGON (Adventure inter national) 
B9.9O0 *Ken Dewitt, Blue Island, ll_ 
2 1 ,060 Oary I Qivens, Ta li a hassee, F L 

4,770 Denis Dion Jr . Thelford Mines, Quebec 

4,760 Simon Clsvet, Thetford Mines. Quebec 

4,040 Jefl Kiisdunk. Miiwaukee. Wl 

SEA QUEST (Mark Data} 

146 * N Wak ell n , Ml . Lebanon , PA 
SEA SEARCH (Marts Data) 

140 *Jorin Allocca, Yonke<-s. NY 
SHENANIGANS (Mark Dafa) 

96 AN. Wakeiin. Ml Lebanon. PA 
SHOOTING GALLERY (Radio Shack) 

399,400 *Adam Petersen, Portland, OR 
46.S60 Patrick SCott Whitehall NY 

SKIING (Hi-tdm Shack) 

01;O0 *Scott Cle^enger. Fairmounl. IN 
0110 Ml ke Sc hart. F remont , OH 

01:12 Sean Conner, Summit, NJ 

05.65 John Hokplns. Greenville, SC 

09.37 Tony Hall. No f th Bay. On farm 

SLAY THE NEREIS ifled*o Shuck) 

84 T 714 ^Thomas Aude3 II, Fremonl. CA 

74,078 Tom Audas, Fremont, CA 

52.581 WlltredThibodeauJr.. Geo rgetown . 

ME 
24.681 Bobby Cha, Fullerlon, CA 

SNAKER (THE RAINBOW) 

1 :24 ALuan ne Ash by , P hoen I *, AZ 
1 26 Dan Sobezak, Mesa, AZ 

1 37 S usan Bal I i nger, I J* brid ge, D nf ario 

1 :50 An dy O raen , Whilehal I . PA 

1:5^ Balju Shah, Deep River, Ontario 

SPACE AMBUSH fCornputerUfflreJ 

24,150 * Mario Asselln, Baie-Comaau, Quebec 



r************************************** 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 181 



I************************************ 



SPACE RACE i Spectral Associates) 

n r 600 #Mario Asselm, Baie-Comsau, Quebec 
SPEED RACE A (MichTron) 

126.7S0 #Jack Martzuilo. Saginaw, Ml 
1 21 . 2B0 Pa u I Ken yon , Pn oen i* AZ 

711,200 Mike Re&becohi, Somerdale, NJ 

109,440 Dan Bouges, Mianlic, CT 

9-9,550 Scroti Cunningham. Easl Lyme r GT 

STAR BLAZE (Radio Shack) 

7,950 *Mallhew Dal&y, Binghamton. NY 
7,950 tMike MarcOl. River Grove. IL 

4 , 500 Ted Bark fey. Wh I tehal I , NY 

STAR TALK (Speech Systems) 

130,400 *Micheel Scoil. Johnstown, NY 
STELLAR LIFE-LINE (Radio Shack) 
1 1 9 , 030 * &ri an 3 babe r, Bojaa. I Q 
73,950 Lori McCuHsr. Brazil, IN 

62 r 390 Andrew La wf ence. Cambrl age. Ontario 

39.21G Alfred Sirva, Cranston, HI 

35,550 Jame$ Fox. Midlothian, VA 

25.970 Sue Hull. Brazil, IN 

STORM ARROWS (Spectrat Associates) 
320,100 +Thoma3 Tiggalbsck, Essen, 

Weal Germany 
231 r T0O Uwe Stemgens, Essen, West Germany 

221,300 Arnold Sniper, Los Angeles, CA 

203,050 Rob Leyden. Roc hosier NY 

164.180 Jon Keeling 



TEMPLE OF ROM {Radio Shack) 

020, 300 *Rh cu Jai rard , OJympia , W A 
463 . 400 G ten n Alt rey , o tympia , w A 

235,690 Jim Issel, Cot ah, CA 

224,000 Sony a Hursl, Rich mend, CA 

137.400 David Oelhaupl. Calgary, Alberta 

TIMeBANDlTlMH^TWU 

23,020 *Joel Lange. Windsor, CT 
TO PRESERVE QUANDIC (Prickly-Pear) 
B7 *Nail Haupt, Grafton. OH 
TRAlLlN'TAiL (THE RAINBOW) 

1 19,705 *Diego Gallina, Summit, N J 
105. 300 Jerry Dill, Frankfort, Ml 

102,930 Phi rip Parent, Smiths Falls, Ontario 

94.S1 Jean -M arc Paren I , £mi \ hs F a 1 1 s 

Ontario 
76,275 Michael Rosenberg, Presto nsburg, KY 

TRAPF ALL { Tom Mix) 

70,392 * Paul Hot 7 Herz ha. Israel 
TREKBOER (Mark Data} 

135 *N. Wahelin, Mt Lebanon. PA 
139 Jim Cock rum. Martinsville IN 

TUTS TOMB { Mask Data) 

184,380 *Blagle Di Lorenzo, Montreal, Quebec 
163,050 Michael McCafferty, Oceanside, CA 

I58.O00 Chris Rosso, Miami, FL 

146,300 Miks Rebbecchi, Somerdale, NJ 

134,580 Judy Smith, Gresham, OR 

1 20.380 Cymh I a Coo rs , Mobi le , A L 



WACKY FOOD f Arcade Animation) 

11 2 , 600 #DaryiG^Bn$, Tallahassee, FL 
WHIH LEY BIRD RUN {Spectral Associates) 
30,100 *Dan Durga, Firm. Ml 
16,900 Slephane Asschn, Baie Comoau, 

Quebec 
WILLYS WAREHOUSE (tntracotori 

183,500 *Alan Morris. Chlcepee, MA 
93, 700 Craig K I uger . M iemi , F L 

29,300 Stepnane Asselm. Baie-Comeau. 

Ouehpq 

ZAKSUN& (ftffej 

480,200 *Ar>ga| Zurliga. Miami. FL 
ZAXXON (Oatasotti 

2.057,800 *Chria Oberhoftzer, Lexfngton, MA 
1 .700.000 B i agio Di Lorenzo. Monlreai, Quohec 

1,510, 000 James Quad rp I la, B roofc I y n , N Y 

666,000 Andy Green. Whitehall. PA 

535 400 Chris WleKernan, Ghaleauguay, 

Quebec 
1 32 , 000 Larry Co wles, West port, W A 

127,350 Vernon Johnson, Parkvillt, MD 

1 07 , 200 Pa ljI H otz. rtwz I ia J s reel 

79,800 Tim Paulus, Utica, Ml 

69,800 Tod Paulus, (Jtiea, Ml 

43,500 Craig Gordon. Philadelphia. PA 

13,900 Abby Gordon. Philadelphia. PA 



— Debbie Hartley 



SCOREBOARD POINTERS 

In conjunction with the rainbow's Scoreboard, we offer this column of 
poi nters for our game-playing readers 5 benefit. If you have some interest- 
ing hints and tips, we encourage you to share them by sending them to 
the Scoreboard, c/o the rainbow. 



TAKING A POLE 

Scoreboard: 

In response lo Lane Shclton's Letter t April 
I9K5, Page [60] concerning Shenanigans, in 
order to gel the pole into the cave you must 
first find the trap door in the ceiling of ihe 
lower level of the cave. You will rise through 
the floor of the cabin, then get ihe pole and 
take it down with you* 

One last thing — ever heard of sliding 
down a Rainbow? In this game, it's fatal, 

If anyone can help me once I'm on the 
mystery-coordinate planet in Trekhoer, Vd 
appreciate it. My address is I4I Lovers 
Lane, 43952. 

George Caleodis 
Steubenvttle, OH 



SOLUTIONS FOR HIRE 

Scoreboard: 

Attention Adventurers' Many of you 
have read Ryan ElanTs letter in the 
November 19R4 issue of the rainuow and 
have written for solutions. Well, for those 
of you who are interested. Ryan Elam has 
moved and can no longer continue to offer 
solutions. Instead, I am making the same 
type of offer, but with a few more 
Adventures. 

1 have several Adventures solved and 
available tor SI per solution. They are 
encoded and come with a decoder program 
and instructions, These solutions are 
available: Blackbeard's Island, Black Sanc- 



tum* Calixto Island, Dallas Quest, Major 
fstar, Mystic Mansion, Sands of Egypt. Sea 
Quest \ Shenanigans, Trekboer, Bedlam, 
Pyramid and Raaka-Tu, 

Please include one stamp for return 
postage or two stamps if ordering three or 
more solutions. Write to 539 S H Berlhe Ave,, 
32404, 

Mikel Rice 
Panama Citw FL 



TIPS FOR TREKBOER 

Scoreboard: 

I solved the Adventure game Trekboer 
and found the most difficult part of the game 
to be past the bridge on Alton, 

Once you have found the amulet and have 
the capsule and a beaker full of acid* you 
are ready to cross the bridge. Once past it, 
type GO FIELD. Be sure, however, that you 
have tied the rope to the tree easl of the 
bridge before crossing. 

For additional tips on Trekhoer write to 
me at 939 S. Harriet, 46151. Please include 
a SASE, 

Jim Cockrum 
Martinsville. IN 



BOARD WITH BUGS? 

Scoreboard: 

For Radio Shack's Ktendaihu, my brother 
and 1 would like to give bug-killers these 
tips. 



If you're looking for Queen's Boards, stay 
in the corners of the grid. Also, when you 
push the space bar to start your jump, if 
the board immediately under your trooper 
says "bug," then wail. The square you are 
on will light up as a Queen's Board. Finally, 
if you wait for time to run out while you 
are on the scoreboard, you will make a 
tremendous amount of monev, \ have made 
as much as $340,000,000. 

We need help with Pyramid, Raaka-Tu 
and Madness and the Minotaur, Anyone 
with information please write to me at 1010 
Montclair Circle. 44145, 

Dan Franzen 
Westlake* OH 



SPELL IT 



Scoreboard: 

In Madness and the Minotaur* if your 
lamp runs out of oil, find the urn and type 
FILL LAMP. This will solve your problem. 
When you are in the room with the Narcissus 
plants, type OPEN CURTAINS, Sometimes 
they will open, sometimes not. When they 
do, you'll find there's a passage you can 
"jump*' into. Whenever you start a new 
game, go upstairs immediately, Sometimes 
you will find the dagger there and sometimes 
food. If you have food, no more will appear 
until you eat what you have, 

How do you know when you have gotten 
a spell and how do you use it? 

I have solved Calivio Island and Bedlam. 
I need help with Madness and the Minotaur, 



^•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••* 



182 



THE RAINBOW June 19B5 



Pyramid, Raaka-Tu and Black Sanctum. If 
anybody can help me with these or if anyone 
needs help with Bedlam, Caiixto Island or 
other neai things in Madness and the 
Minotaur, write to me at 474 Montague 
Ave, R31. IT7 

Rk Miller 
Winnipeg, Manitoba 



FADING AWAY 



Scoreboard: 

Yes, the Minotaur is driving me to 
madness. 1 must know before it is too late: 
Where is the lamp oil? Why are the walls 
h strange color? And what is the eerie glow 
from behind the rocks? I'm slipping away 
fast. Please help! Send the answers, or the 
name of a good institution, to 1 137- A 
Pebble Creek Pkwy. t 35208. 

Doug Miles 
Birmingham, AL 



Scoreboard: 

I have a suggestion to anyone who writes 
a letter to be printed in the "Scoreboard" 
section of THE rainbow. If you expect to 
have a written response 10 your letter from 
other readers, please include your street 
address (and ZIP code) in your letter. It 
is quite difficult to respond to a letter 
without all of t h e ne ee s k ary in f o r m at i on . 

Randolph L Harrison 
Wilmington, OH 



SHARK REPELLENT 

Scoreboard: 

To gel past the sharks in Sea Quest, get 
the metal detector, go to the bottom of the 
stairs and go east once. PUSH BUTTON, DIG 
and GET MIRROR. Give the mirror in the 
mermaid to get a key to the trap door in 
the beach house. In the attic (through the 
trap door) you will find a bottle. Go to the 
sharks and OPEN BOTTLE and the sharks 
will leave. 

If you would like the solutions to either 
Sea Quest or Sands of Egypt t or if you have 
a few questions about them, send a SASE 
to 30994, Bedford Di\, 92373. 

This week I finally purchased Pyramid* 
From reading all the letters in this section, 
I was expecting a lot. I didn't even think 
about the fact that there might not be 
graphics* I expected there would be* I still 



think it's a great Adventure, but without 
graphics it is not quite as good. What 1 
would like to know is do the other Radio 
Shack Adventures [Bedlam, Raaka-Tu and 
Madness and the Minotaur) have graphics? 
If anyone writes to me concerning the above 
Adventures, please tell me (if you know) 
whether or not any of the Radio Shack 
Adventures have graphics. 

Brett Noble 
Redlands t CA 



Scoreboard: 

\ am in a position to offer comprehensible, 
step~by-siep help sheets on the following: 
Black Sanctum, Caiixto island, Trekhoer 
and Sands of Egypt. They are printouts of 
alt the necessary inputs to get you through 
the game. 

I also might be able to help with these: 
Alpha IL Bedlam. Head of the Beast, 
Karrak, Lurk ley Manor and Raaka-Tu. 
And TVe had many good landings with 
Worlds of Flight and Flight Simulator and 
may have some tips. 

If you feel 1 can help, please send a SASE 
to me and 111 be happy to respond to your 
request. My address is 1 1403 48th Dr, N.E. T 
98270, 

James K. Knight 
Marysville, WA 



Scoreboard: 

I have solved the games Head of the Beast 
and Lurk ley Manor. I have the maps for 
both of these and if anyone needs help, 
please write, My address is 146 Woodward 
Ave., P.O. Box 1312, POR 1B0\ 

Martin Steinke 
Blind River. Ontario 



Scoreboard: 

I have solved Sands of Egypt. If anyone 
needs help, call (813) 251-61 17 after 5 p.m., 
or send a SASE to me at 2801 Skins Ave., 
33629. I need help or clues for Sea Quest. 
Trekhoer. Shenanigans and Caiixto Island, 
William Triplet! 
Tampa, FL 



LET THERE BE LIGHT 

Scoreboard: 
Does anyone know how to open the crypt 



in Madness and the Minotaur, or how to 
light the lantern in Black Sanctum? 

If anyone needs help with Pyramid. 
Raaka-Tu, Dungeons of Daggorath, 
Bedlam or Caiixto Island, feel free rn write 
to me at 1605 Fleetwood Ct., 62549, 

Robbie Sablotny 
Mt, lion, IL 



SLITHERING PAST THE SERPENT 

Scoreboard: 

I have had the Adventure game Pyramid 
2000 for about a year 1 have never been 
able to get by the serpent in the pharaoh's 
chamber* Could someone please write to me 
and tell me how? My address is 1 1351 Sl 
Laurent Dr., S9A 3P6. 

Erik Nickel 
North Bat t left rd, Saskatchewan 



NEEDY NEOPHYTE 

Scoreboard: 

Help! I am a reader in need. I need he] 
with Pyramid, You see, I am new at all text 
Adventures and I mainly need help with the 
snake and the maze* I heard that a bird 
will kill the snake. Is this true? I have found 
the vase, but what do you do with it; you 
can't set it down, If anyone can help me. 
please send me the answers or clues at 6212 
Glenhaven Dr., 79762, Help, please! 

Nathan Sykes 
Odessa, TX 



CAVE CANEM 



Scoreboard: 

In the game Bedlam, 1 can't get past the 
dog in the kennel. It's driving me crazy! Do 
any of your readers have an idea that would 
help me? 

Also, in the game Black Sanctum, how 
do you sprinkle the ash into the circle at 
the end of ihe game? My brother and 1 spent 
days getting to the end, only to find we can't 
"sprinkle'- the ash. We dropped it and were 
killed instantly, If you have a solution send 
it to i44l Kearney Drive, 08902. Please help 
us! 

Judd Ross man 
North Brunswick. NJ 






•••••••*••••*••••••••••••••••••••••• 



June 1965 THE RAINBOW 183 



THE NEW GENERATION 




120 CPS with true descenders. 
NLQ 17 x 11 (Near Letter Quality). 
2K BUFFER accessible. 
HEX DUMP for Machine Language listings. 
ULTRA HI bit image graphics. 
20% INCREASE in throughput. 



• SG- 10 PRINTER 

• BLUR STREAK II INTERFACE 
W/MODEM SWITCH 

• SUPER GEMPRINT 

• TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL 



COMPLETE 
SYSTEM 

NOTHING MORE TO BUY 

$^QQ95 + SIO Shipping 

AOZr and Insurance 

SG-15-439* 



1 YEAR STAR WARRANTY 

Servicable at over 4000 locations. 



5BLUE STREAK II 

SERIAL TO PARALLEL INTERFACE 



• RUN COCO I or II to PARALLEL PRINTER 

• HIGH QUALITY TOGGLE SWITCH ELIMINATES CABLE SWITCHING 

• 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 SWITCHABLE BAUD RATES 

• AC POWER OPTION AL-NOT NEEDED WITH SG- 10 PRINTER 

• COMPLETE WITH ALL CABLES AND CONNECTORS 

• 180 DAY WARRANTY 

ff^b CJ95 SHIPPING (SPECIFY PRINTER) 

RAINBOW 3^ PAID! 






SUPER GEMPRINT 

CUSTOM SOFTWARE 



^ ,# 



sew* 



8' 



o 1 






R ot. 



ft^L, 



03 



use* 



(ft 



~0\-°* 



V*£ 



*S 



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$4* 



( {;&*** 



nH 



'Overall, Super Gemprint is very well-written and documented." 

-Rainbow December 84 review. 

BONUS! TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

FREE WITH SUPER GEMPRINT 

Menu driven program for the CoCo. Teaches and shows the new 
user the numerous features of the SG-10. 

SUPER GEMPRINT AND $-| ^95 + $2 Shipping 

TYPE SELECTION/TUTORIAL PROGRAM A/ and Handling 



DAYTON ASSOCIATES", INC. 




muronicfim 

AUTHORIZED 
DEALER 



DUN & BRADSTREET LISTED 

7201 CLAIRCREST BLDG. C 
DAYTON, OHIO 45424 
OHIO RESIDENTS ADD 6% SAL 
COD. APDS2.00 



AUTO'ORDERLINE 

1-800-251 STAR 

Personal Service 

(513)236-1454 



RAINBOW REVIEWS 




Adventurus Supremus 4.6B 

A Departure From The Usual/Bacchus Computer Software • , . t , _ 221 

Aut-O-Start 

Your Cassette Program's Best Friend/Spectrum Projects, trie ,220 

Centipede ABC's And 123's 

Provide Un pressured Learning For Children/Tnad Pictures Corp 205 

CoCo Grey 

Greatly Enhances The VIEW II Package/SoftC/rcutfs .,197 

CoCo Max 

Delivers An Outstanding Performance/Co/orware, Inc. ... . .• , 21 7 

CoCo Professional Tax Preparer 

An Excellent Tax Aid/Micro Data Systems , . . . . . . ,. w ., . .199 

CoCo Tuner 

Fine Tuning With The OoCo/Reai-Time Specialties, inc. 203 

ColorStat 

A Good Statistical Program For Beginners/flad/o Shack .., , . ,.198 

Congress 

Takes You On A Presidential Quest/B-5 Software ,195 

Dan Tucker's Mine 

A Gold Mine Of An Adventure/Pa/ Creations ........ . . . . . 206 

Data Line Switch Box 

Double CoCo's Serial Pori/Phelan Enterprises 224 

Debacle 

Test Your Command Strategies/F/cosoff Games . . . , . .209 

DESIGNER 

Create Your Own Fashions/Cogntf/Ve Development Company,, . .202 

Electra-Guard 

Clip Surge Spikes/ Howard Medical 210 

Galactic Fighter 

Release Earth From Alien Invasion/Four Star Software, .... . 192 

LINER 

Go On An 'Eebfewalker' Huni/Michael Stuller 216 

ME-128-64K 128K Upgrade 

Expands CoCo's Memory /Dynamic Electronics, inc. ........ ,21 1 

Metabot 

Destroy The Enemy And Don't Get Caught/HARMOW VC3 ,. 207 

P51 Mustang Attack Flight Simulator 

Takes You On A WW II Aerial Battle/Tom Mix Software ,222 

PANZERS EAST! 

Gives Many Hours Of War Game Competition/7fie Amlon Hill Game Company 214 

Recess Games 

Encourages Logical Thought Processes/S-5 Software ., .208 

SBASIC 

BASIC With A Foreign Accent/Tantfar Software,. , 223 

Sam Sleuth, P.I. 

An Extraordinary Case/Gomputerwafe .201 

Shamus 

The Shadow Lurks In This Action-Packed Game/ Radio Shack 212 

Tlc-Tac-Toe 

An Enjoyable Game For Youngsters/Draco Software 215 

Triple Joyport Switcher 

Saves Wear And Tear On Your CoCo/Spectrum Projects, tnc . . .216 

VIEW II 

Slow Scan TV At A Price That Can't Be Beat/SoftC/rcu/fa 197 

YACHTSEE 

Can Make Dice-Rolling Addictive/Sear Grip Software r 211 

Zookey 

A Fun And Helpful Typing Tutor/Mark Data Products 204 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 185 



Radio Shack Has 
Want for Your 



Save Time and 
Effort at Home 

Color File.** An eas y-to-use 
home filing sys- 
tem to alphabet- 
ize, select, 
examine, revise I 
and store 
household re- 
cords. Comes pre-set with seven 
files— or create * A oc 

your own. #26-3103 Z4 wo 




;.;., - 



Spectaculator^. Do home planning 
and budgeting 
with this elec- 
tronic spread- 
sheet. Just en- 
ter numbers and 
formulas— re- 
sults are displayed on command. 
Ideal for home financial ~ - Q _ 
forecasting. #26-31 04 J*** 3 






A powerful 



Color SCRIPSIT 

home word pro- 
cessing system 
for correction- 
free letters. Text 
can be saved on 
optional cassette 
recorder or printed with *.-- 
optional printer. #26-3105 34 a& 




Personal Finance II 
expense catego- 
ries, including 
auto, gas, food 
and more. Re- 
view spending 
on year-to-date 
or category basis 
#26-3106 



Includes 26 



"' 1 



3405 



K *t£ * "el Aft* t 

s mam rvA mimrnxx 

i una 

. Ll.v-iS.'i.., -UdlvWV 

■ . ■ . ■ 

, nMifeJ wmsiw* 

mitt »•« 



COLORSTAT.* * Use your Color 
Computer to 
turn compli- 
cated home or 
business data 
into statistics for 
easy analysis, 

or print them on an optional printer 
for your records. o ji a* 

#26-3107 dOr 9 

•Joysticks requited. 
* 'CassBtte recorder required. 

' ' 'Joysticks and recorder required. 



Educational Software from Walt Disney 



iiki- H <llLl it IKI Lit Uftl it, 



Your Choice 

34?5 

Telling Time 
with Donald/* 

Teaching your 
children to tell time is easy with a 
little help from Donald Duck. For 
ages 5-8, #26-2530 

Mickey's World of Writing.* * 

An exciting way 
to build impor- 
tant writing 
skills! Young- 
sters learn the 
basics of sen- 
tence structure and fundamental 
writing skills with Mickey Mouse. 
For ages 8 -11. #26-2532 




>L 1 -I Li -*rfl -HIM II III!. >. ... 

- < . ril, II* lk-f » 

•no it»* i ;:-h <i..i ** i ■» >iimi 




Mickey's Alpine Adventure.* 4 

A frosty explora- 
tion of spelling 
and reading 
concepts. Learn 
important spell- 
ing rules and 
the sounds of vowels and conso- 
nants with Mickey Mouse and 
Donald Duck, #26-2534 

Space Probe: Math.** An excit- 
ing interstellar 
study of mathe- 
matical word 
problems- 
Youngsters 
learn the con- 
cepts of area and perimeter during 
outer space adventure. For ages 
7-14- #26-2537 




Down land * You're alone in a se- 
cret cave, travel- 
ing from 
chamber to 
chamber collect- 
ing keys, gold 
and diamonds. 
But can you jump, 
climb and run to safety? rt - Qft 
#25-3046 24" 




Canyon Climber* Your climbing 

skills are under 

test when you 

find kicking 

goats, falling 

rocks, zinging 

arrows and 

more on your way to 

the summit. #26-3089 




3495 




the Software You 
Color Computer 



Learning Programs from Spinnaker 



Your Choice 

2Q95 

mm W Each 




-"- 



m&fi-S* 



Pacemaker. An i ■ «%* '•■ 

exciting game to 

help your kids 

learn computer basics while they 

create an animated face. 

#26-3166 

Kids on Keys. Your kids will enjoy 

learning with the 

computer as 

they identify 

numbers, letters 

and words. It's 

fun and your 

kids will learn 

important math and spelling skills. 

#26-3167 



~~ a n 




Kindercomp, Introduce your chil- 
dren to com- 
puter graphics! 
Even the 
youngest in 
your family will 
enjoy creating 

vivid color pictures and exciting 
sound effects by pressing a few 
keys. #26-3168 

Fraction Fever. An exciting math 
contest! Your 
kids will develop 
a real under- 
standing of 
fractional rela- 
tionships as 
they guide their 

graphic "pogo stick' 1 through this 
colorful game. #26-3169 




Dungeons of Daggorath. 
You're pitted 
against a suc- 
cession of awe- 
some beasts in 
the fearful dun- 
geon. Each vic- 
tory brings you closer to your 
ultimate foe— the ftAOC 

wtzard. #26-3093 29 95 




Baseball, * This exciting game 
plays just like 
the big leagues! 
You are the 
coach— it's up 
to you to control 
the pitching, de- 
fense, and running for ex- A -„ 
tra excitement. #26-3095 24 M 






More Learning Fun 
for Your Kids 

Vocabulary Tutor 
Give your chil- 
dren a head 
start in school 
Start building 
their vocabulary 
at home with an 
exciting word and description match- 
ing game they'll love to play rtOC 
For grades 3-5. #26-2568 ' 8 W5 

Vocabulary Tutor 2. * * More 
practice match- 
ing words and 
definitions and 
placing words in 
appropriate sen- 
tences. Great 
for helping young students get 
ahead. For grades rt „ 

3*5. #26-2569 O 86 

Color Math.* * Make learning fun. 
Supplement 
your children's 
study with prob- 
lems in addition 
and subtraction. 
For ages 6-14. 
#26-3201 ig95 



Radio /hack 

The Technology Store" 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 





Find out more about 

Radio Shack's Color Computer. 

Send for a free catalog. 

Mail To: Radio Snacks Dept. 85-A-351 
300 One Tandy Qtfritt 
Fort Worth. Texas 76102 



1 



| Nam?. 



CHy. 



_ State _ 



_Zip_ 



L I 

Priow apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers end 
al participating Radio Shac* stores and dealers Dis- 
ney, Mickey Mouse arvd Donald Duck are registered 
trademarks of Wait Disney Productions. Faca maker 
KirJs on Keys, KJndereomp, Fraction Fever and Spin- 
naker are registered trademarka of Spinnaker Inc 



RECEIVED & CERTIFIED 



The following products recently have been received 
by the rainbow, examined by our magazine staff and 
approved for the Rainbow Seal of Certification, your 
assurance that we have seen the product and have 
ascertained that it is what it purports to be. 
This month the Seal of Certification has been 
issued to: 



Magic Lessons 1-3 and/ or 4-6, two 32K 

ECB programs requiring a disk drive to 
teach six different magic tricks. Each set 
comes with the necessary props to achieve 
the different effects. The text screen is Hi- 
Res with graphics illustrations to aid in 
mastering the tricks. Merlin's Software, 
11515 Casey Rd., Tampa, FL 33624, 
cassettes $19.95 each 



The Ultimate Color Computer Reference 
Guide And Toolkit, a book by David D. 
McLeod and Robert van der Poel which 
provides a comprehensive BASIC reference 
manual with command references, tech- 
niques to write more efficient programs and 
BASIC and machine language subroutines for 
incorporation into the user's programs. 
CMD Micro, Computer Services Ltd., 
10447-124 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, 
Canada T5N 1R7, $27.95 U.S. plus $3.50 
S/H, $34.95 CND. plus $3.50 S/H 

The Software Kit For The Ultimate Color 
Computer Reference Guide And Toolkit, 

the tape or disk companion to CMD Micro's 
book, The Ultimate Color Computer 
Reference Guide And Toolkit, containing! 
executable code for all subroutines discussed 
in the text. CMD Micro, Computer Servic||§ 
Ltd., 10447-124 Street, Edmonton, Alber|t§ 
Canada T5N 1R7, cassette $12.95 U.S. rfpf 
$1.50 S/H, $14.95 CND. plus $1.50 Spiff 
disk $14.95 U.S. plus $1.50 S/H, $17.95 
CND. plus $1.50 S/H 

Full Character Set Board, allowing Co<|§ 
to display the full 96-character ASCII set 
on the video screen by replacing the 
character set contained within the 6847 
VDG chip in the computer. Also featured 
are true descenders on lowercase characters, 
braces and vertical bar characters and 
slashed zeros. CoCo Devices, Box 677, 
Seabrook, TX 77586, $38 plus $2 S/H 

Look 'N' Listen, a 64K set of OS-9 utilities 
featuring 1) Screen, for Hi-Res display that 
is compatible with O-Pak but 27 percent 
faster; 2) stand-alone sound utilities that 
allow you to make sound through OS-9 
independent of any additional hardware; 3) 
three boot routines: cold reboot, return to 
Disk basic, warm reboot, reboots OS-9 
from drive /DO, make RS.Boot, makes an 
OS-9 diskette bootable even with Disk 
BASIC 1.0. Computerware, P.O. Box 668, 
Encinitas, CA 92024, disk $29.95 plus $2 
S/H 



DUDUL, a 64K ECB graphics doodling 
program requiring a joystick or mouse with 
screen services such as memory save, 
memory restore, memory exchange and file. 
Comes on cassette capable of being trans- 
ferred to disk with a Diskshow program as 
well as a Tapeshow program. Doug Dugan, 
4514 Wichita, St. Louis, MO 63310, cassette 
$22 plus $2 S/H 



Remote Plus 1.1, a 64K.,hast communications 

progran^^^l^^^^i^lfjilar for use 
as b((^|^^^S-albne'no'st r ^i^^]|tr as a 
te&gll^ 

lip'fexJifM 

||Re, Jilt^ E . D. C 

¥ In||Bries|pSr Box 42?!i| : S&s Angeles,' ' 
f (|ilb0ii|i54.95 plus $2.50 lift, 11 - 



Vizipraw, a 64K graphics utihty. requiring , 

'lllpyslll^s <S alllpiie Iflfiatf gri|hl|s ; :||d| 
li|ex|Q| o||r|iS|i|p|ptel;::sibh agf camera ■ 
llelif %Jlufs llr Sli^lrtSteif arlicli' 
illustration and/ or cover art. Vizi Draw can 
.^e^sed: t%=edi| a printed^ page p&i$A or 
f jtfnaftrf fuf ^eT#%.;. #i-cpl0rlrtp|s 
graphics screens. Also, multicolor graphics 
is supported ^with -GDI /RUT and fill oper- 
ations. GRA#ir^|Box 254, West 
Mifflin, PA 151 2^ cassette or disk $49.95 
plus $2 S/H 



Fast Food Math, a 32K ECB educational 
game designed to aid students, grades two 
through eight, in learning to handle money. 
There are four levels of difficulty ranging 
from the amount of change (calculated and 
displayed by the computer) to totaling the 
entire order, finding the sales tax, adding 
the two totals, computing the change and 
returning the correct change to the customer. 
MESA, Middletown High School, Valley 
Road, Middletown, RI 02840, cassette $24, 
disk $26 plus $2.50 S/H 



C Language Instant Reference Card, an 8/2" 

by 11" plastic reference card providing a 
concise summary of c language for those 
using or learning C to avoid breaking 
concentration to go on a manual hunt while 
programming. Micro Logic Corp., P.O. Box 
174, Dept. F, Hackensack, NJ 07602, $5.95 
plus$l S/H 

More Keys, a 1 5-key numeric keypad to plug 
inside CoCo for the convenience of rapid 
numeric data entry. Comes with cable and 
connector; you must specify computer 
model Moreton Bay, 316 Castillo Street, 
Santa Barbara, CA 93101, $69.95 plus $2 
S/H 

ALCATRAZ, a 32K ECB text Adventure. 

The scenario: You find yourself imprisoned 

unjustly and sentenced to death. You must 

escape to prove your innocence. Featured 

are many logic problems to test the skills 

k of experienced players. Owls Nest Software, 

iP.O. Box 579, Ooltewah, TN 37363, cassette 

§§.17.95, disk $20.95 

llpomsday At 2100, a 32K ECB text 
"Sdventure which casts you as the secret 
agent who must escape captivity, locate and 
prevent a madman from launching a missile 
that will trigger global destruction. Pal 
Creations, 10456 Amantha Ave., San Diego, 
CA 92126 or CoCoNut Software, R.R. #2, 
Site 9 Box 1, Tofield, Alberta, Canada T0B 
4J0, cassette$14.95 

Cook Book, a 32K home utility requiring 
a disk drive that provides a database of 
approximately 320 recipes and features 
recipes according to compatibility with 
other foods and beverages, ease of prepa- 
ration and cost, scaling of recipes either up 
or down to serve two to 99 people, creation 
of shopping list ingredients, printout of 
recipes and shopping lists, provides a Help 
screen of glossary terms and a timer to assist 
in meal preparation. Radio Shack stores 
nationwide, disk $39.95 



CoCo Echo, a 16K printer utility that allows 
the user to dump a text screen to the printer. 
Tothian Software, P.O. Box 663, Rimers- 
burg, PA 16248, cassette $9.95 



188 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Solar Explorer, a 32K ECB electronic book 
providing an introductory course in astron- 
omy. Featured are basic facts about the 
planets in our solar system, Earth's moon, 
the planets' distance from the sun, length 
of years for planets, temperature, diameter, 
gravity, density, mass and atmosphere for 
each ^wanderer." Radio Shack stores 
nationwide, $19.95 

Guide To Super Software for the TRS-80 
Color Computer, a book by Scott L. 
Norman which discusses most of the major 
applications software for the CoCo, includ- 
ing word processing software, spelling 
checkers, mail-merge packages, spreadsheets 
and database managers. Scott, Foresman 
and Company, Professional Publishing 
Group, 1900 East Lake Avenue, Glenview, 
IL 60026, $18.95 

Aut-O-Start, a 16K utility to autostart your 
BASIC or ML programs with title screens 
using a mixture of text ; ^|p^|^aphic^ ; :,: 
Spectrum Projects, Inc;^i0f Box 21272, 
Woodhaven, NY 1 1421jfpette;f Slllf lus 
$3 S/H Jg|f Jif: " 

Datarase, a compa||pPg!p[ |§|pr that 
will accept either Jf§^ q^8-pSl'devices. 
Provided are two Jiffs i|||rwt|||f 'the user 
slides the EPRO\ts to be erased? Each slot 
has a thin metal shutter to prevent UV light 
from escaping whenSpSf fp us|f^llo§5n|||h|§ 
EPROM to be plS$g|iosf£ '% t§§ lamp 
which reduces erase imellpStirum fropctsfS 
Inc., P.O. Box 21272, Woodhaven, NY 
11421, $49.95 plus $3 S/jHU,, ,,^ ,,,,,^ , ; ^, ;i 

Triple Joyport Switcher, an accessory that 
allows switching back and forth of joyslfekC 
mouse, touch pad and /or light pen. IpeC- 
trum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $39.95 plus $3 S/H 



Super Voice, a 32-64K speech synthesizer 
allowing the user to write talking basic 
programs, specifying inflection, intonation, 
articulation and filtration. Also possible are 
music, singing over a six octave range and 
sound effects. Speech Systems, 38W 255 
Deerpath Road, Batavia, IL 60510, $79.95 
plus $2 S/H 



CoCo Testem, a 32K ECB education utility 
requiring an 80-column printer with under- 
line function to create and print tests. 
Possible are the creation of multiple choice, 
fill in the blank, short answer, true/ false 
and matching tests. Tothian Software, P.O. 
Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 16248, cassette 
$19.95 

Graphic Physics, a 16K ECB educational 
aid allowing the exploration of concepts in 
physics. Tothian Software, P.O. Box 663, 
Rimersburg, PA 16248, cassette $19.95 

Lissajous Art, a 16K ECB graphics program 
requiring a dot matrix printer such as the 
DMP-110 or LP VIII to create and print 
out intricate Lissajous figures. Tothian 
Software, P.O. Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 
16248, cassette $19.95 

jllllg^jPays, a 32K ECB game which 
pre^efti^^|tp life teaching experiences and 
^^|^JJ^nges"y§Si|Q ..make the choice that will 
^feSi^l^^stuii^,^ impress the adminis- 
Jration"!^ sanity. Tothian 
^tS^re/ ; ^i|,Boifc, Rimersburg, PA 
Kfii^ette||l9.9l|^ 

Screen Irt||§jer|||:l 6K|| ASIC utility that 
allows thelggr t<f|frite||||siC programs on 
a dark text screen with light letters. Tothian 
Saftware^O^Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 

!§2||, eps%if>|§ f 

fcinfr CSiiefatoif^a f&K ECB program that 
will draw sound waves as you hear them 
ffod J|ak| rtiaGhinfelanguage sound that can 
lbrl%CuteS%y"SA^ic. Tothian Software, 
P.O. Box 663, Rimersburg, PA 16248, 
$£s$ette $19.95 

Ledger One, a 32-64K ECB financial utility 
for single entry bookkeeping and accounting 
requiring a disk drive for random access 
data storage and processing. Possible are 
the recording of several hundred transactions 
and the selection of any two dates for Ledger 
One to display all transactions made in that 
interval. The same data may be sent to the 
printer at any time, as well as viewed on 
the screen. West Bay Company, Route 1, 
Box 666, White Stone, VA 22578, cassette 
or disk $20 



The Seat of Certification program is open to 

all manufacturers of products for the TRS-80 

Color Computer, theTDP-100, or the Dragon-32, 

regardless of whether they advertise in the rainbow. 

By awarding a Seat, the magazine certifies the 

program does exist, but this does not constitute any 

guarantee of satisfaction. As soon as possible, these 

hardware or software items will be forwarded to 

the rainbows reviewers for evaluation. 

— Monica Dorth 



16K Tape — Extended Color BASIC 
32K Disk convertible from tape* 

DO YOU KNOW HOW MUCH 
CASH YOU REALLY HAVE? 

Do you know if you will run short of cash 
any time In the next year? If you know 
you won't, do you know the minimum cash 
surplus you'll have jn the next year? 

Either way, you'll gain from using the 

CASH PROPHET 

available from Everyones Computer Co. 
The CASH PROPHET is an easy-to-use, 
high quality, menu-driven, household 
budget system that eliminates the hassle 
of recording every penny spent. No 
double-entry bookkeeping here! 

It prophesies your future checking account 
balances and two interest-bearing savings 
accounts. 

It's dynamic: it can re-forecast the next 
52 weeks any time your household's 
income or spending plans change or you 
"bust" the budget. 

It's the lazy man's budget system: it saves 
your regular expenses on tape or disk for 
recall. You can enter repetitive weekly, bi- 
weekly, and monthly income with a single 
record. 

Your expenses vary from month to month. 
You have bi-monthly, quarterly, semi- 
annual, and annual expenses — some of 
them large. You can't possibly remember 
them all. The CASH PROPHET reminds 
you when each is due. 
If you are paid weekly or bi-weekly you 
will appreciate how the CASH PROPHET 
recognizes that some months have more 
paychecks than others. You will applaud 
when it automatically compensates for the 
differences. 

It was designed to report on the screen 

but will print out on demand. 

It can schedule thousands of transactions 

under 73 different headings! 

The CASH PROPHET runs from tapes on 

CoCos with as little as 16K (Extended 

Color BASIC)! it is only sold on cassettes 

and comes with complete instructions 

that even novice CoCo users will 

understand! 

* Instructions are included to easily 
convert operations from tape to 32K disk. 
You may personally use the CASH 
PROPHET for only (U.S.) $39.95! Shipping 
and handling charges are included in the 
continental U.S.; $5 extra in Canada; $15 
extra otherwise. 

To order, send your check or money order 
to: 

Everyones Computer Co., 

P.O. Box 771 -R, 

Chesterfield, MO 63017. 

Your money back if the CASH PROPHET 

can't handle your household budget. 

Dealer inquiries invited 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 189 



REVIEWING 




LIBRARY I 

Editor: 

I was disappointed by the review of 
Library /in the April 1985 issue of RAINBOW 
[Page 195]. The review does not provide 
enough information for the potential buyer 
to decide whether or not Library I is worth 
owning. 

Library lis a productivity tool specifically 
for use on a CoCo with Color Disk 
EDTASM, and at least 32K and one disk 
drive. This is a package for the assembly 
language programmer, from novice to 
expert, who is using Color Disk EDTASM. 

Perhaps the simplest way to demonstrate 
the ease of using this package is to show 
the code necessary to define, open, read and 
close a disk file in assembly language using 
Library I For this example, assume an 
assembly language program in which the 
Library source files have been included. The 
section of code needed to define, open, read 
and close a disk file would be: 



DCB 

bOPEN 
DREAD 
DCLOSE 



Fl, "NAME", "EXT" 

PBUF, LBUF,25,4 

Fl 

Fl 

Fl 



The review states that "the package does 
well what it sets out to do." What Sadafe 
Software set out to do with Library I was 
increase the productivity of assembly 
language programmers by removing the 
tedium of coding mundane tasks. This was 
accomplished by providing macros calls that 
use a clear and consistent syntax. We did 
the mundane tasks so the assembly language 
programmer can concentrate on the creative. 
We feel that we did well what we set out 
to do. 

Craig Hunt 
Sadare Software 

Editor: 

The package, as I said before, does its 
job well, and its documentation is admirable. 
Given that I have indicated what that job 
is and who might be expected to find it 
useful, what more, within the confines of 
a brief notice, need be said? 

R. W. Odlin 
Sedro-Woolley, WA 



LIZPACK 

Editor: 

I enjoyed the review of LIZPA CK in the 
March 1985 issue LPage 212], The address 
at the end of the review, however, was the 
author's and not that of Prickly-Pear 
Software; 2640 N. Conestoga Avenue, 
Tucson, AZ 85749. Also, LIZPA CK retails 
for $195 instead of $200. 

Joanne Chintis 
Prickly- Pear Software 



QUIZ KIDS 

Editor: 

We would like to thank the reviewer of 
QUIZ KIDS for his detailed and thoughtful 
review. 

The intention of QUIZ KIDS is to 
introduce the child to a learning environment 
similar to BASIC, so that the eventual 
transition from logo to fiASic will be easier. 
The brisk sales of QUIZ KIDS confirm that 
this program fills a long-standing void in 
the educational software available for the 
CoCo. 

Bernice Klein 
B & B Software 



MAZE RUNNER 



Editor: 

Thank you for reviewing Maze Runner 
(April 1985, Page 217) and the kind words 
of Bruce Rothermel. I can appreciate 
Bruce's problems with being a perpetual 
trainee. I wrote the program, but it is my 
children who occasionally make it through 
the inner circle and on to a treat Bruce and 
I may never experience, the Mother Maze. 
For those of you contemplating the chal- 
lenge, you may not be aware that Harmonycs 
and Color Connection merged. Maze 
Runner (and my other programs: Amorti- 
zation, Match & Spell TIC-T AC- TOE 
MATH and DIET- AD E) can now be 
purchased from Color Connection Software, 
1060 Buddlea Drive, Sandy, Utah 84070. 
The price is the same. 

Dennis O. Dorrity 
Color Connection Software 



DATALIST 

Editor: 

We would like to thank rainbow and 
Gary Smith for the complimentary review 
of DATALIST in the March 1985 issue 
[Page 218]. 

The latest version of DA TVlL/STprovides 
the additional capability of totaling any or 
all fields for report purposes. There is now 
a disk version of DA TALISTwith the added 
feature of allowing tape files to be loaded 
by the disk version. 

We hope these comments will be helpful 
to your readers and we commend Gary 
Smith for his fine review. 

Arlin Karger 
Computer Associates, Inc. 



BURNER+ 



Editor: 

I would like to thank Rainbow and Mr. 
Ellers for reviewing our product, the 
Burner*, in the February 1985 issue [Page 
228]. Overall, the review was very compli- 
mentary with only two minor errors. 

Mr. Ellers pointed out that the Burner* 
will program the 2708 EPROM. The 2708 
is an old IK EPROM that is very rarely 
used today. The reason for this is that the 
2708 requires three separate power supplies 
(+5V, -5V, and +12V). The Burner* will 
only program single supply (+5 V) EPROMs. 
Luckily, multi-supply EPROMs are not 
used in modern systems. 

In regard to 16K EPROMs (27128), Mr. 
Ellers stated that the last few hundred 
addresses of these cannot be programmed. 
This is not true. The entire 16K of these 
EPROMs can be programmed by the 
Burner*, The only restriction is in reading 
the last 256 addresses when you deselect 
Disk basic. This means you could have Disk 
1 .0 in one half of the 27 1 28 for compatibility's 
sake, and some Super DOS in the other 
half for all those special features. This 
EPROM could then either stay in the 
Burner* or it could be mounted inside the 
controller to free up the Burner*. 

Once again, thanks to Ed Ellers and the 
rainbow. 

Peter Pollak 
Pollak Electronics 



190 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 







nuternen 



useway(D-2), Cocoa Beach, Florida 32931 



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GET YOUR LIFE ORGANIZED 

DATE-O-BASE CALENDAR 

puts YOU in charge of your schedule! 

■ Graphically displays any monthly 
calendar between 1 700 and 2099. 
You put in up to twelve 28 character 
memos per day. .. calendar shows 
where the memos are , , . call up of 
day shows details. 

■ Use for appointments or a log of past activity. 

■ Search capability allows you to list or print all memos between 
two specified dates or only ones meeting key-word criteria. 

■ Date computation shows elapsed time between two dates in 
days, weeks, months and years. 

■ Printed graphic calendar available with optional Screen Print 
Program. 

■ Requires 32K in BASIC 

TAPE DATE-O-BASE CALENDAR - $1 6.95 (max. 400 memos/ 
tape file) 

DISK DATE-O-BASE CALENDAR - $19.95 (over4000 memos/ 
disk. . . max. 300 memos/month) 

GRAPHIC SCREEN PRINT PROGRAM 

Works in all PMODES and lets you shift screen image anywhere on 
the printed page. 

■ Relocatable code lets you Use all of your 16K or32K machine. 

■ Available in Color Basic 1.0 and 1.1/1 .2! Use EXEC 41 175 to 
see which you have and SPECIFY WITH ORDER. 

■ SPECIFY PRINTER TYPE ... in Machine Language, 
S7.95-TRS-80® LP-VII/VIII& DMP 100/105/200/400/420 
$9.95- Epson GRAFTRAX®, NEC® PC 8023 A-C, IDS 440/445, 
Paper Tiger® 460/560, Micro Prism® 480, Prism® 80/132 (with dot 
plotting),TRS-80®DMP-120, DMP-110,TDP-1,PROWRITER® Cen- 
tronics 739, Microline® 82A/83A(with Okigraph 1 ) /84/92/93, Star 
Micronics, Inc. GEMINI 10/1 Ox/1 5 and Gorilla Banana 
(Trademarks of Tandy Corp., Epson America, Inc., C-ltoh, NEC 
America, Okidata Corp., Integral Data Systems, Inc.) 



POT YOUR FINANCES IN ORDER 

DISK DOUBLE ENTRY 

if you have spent hours trying to balance 
your Debits and Credits, DISK DOUBLE 
ENTRY is for you! 

■ Designed for small business, club 
and personal use. 

■ Entertransactions in a journal type 
format. Program will maintain cur- 
rent account balances, produce Trial Balance^ Income, 
Balance Sheet reports and complete Account Ledgers. 

■ Will handle up to 300 accounts including report headings and 
totals. 

■ Up to 1 400 average transactions on a diskette. 

■ Summary reports and four levels of subtotals available. 

■ Requires 32K and an understanding of standard double entry 
accounting concepts. 

$44.95 in BASIC with Machine Language subroutines 



H 

43 

+69 

102 

1+4+6=11 



HELP YOUR 
CHILDREN 
HELP 
THEMSELVES 



MATH TUTOR 

■ 5 Programs in 1 . . . ranges from simple addition through long 
division with 4 levels of difficulty. 

■ Requires regrouping to be shown . . . provides for trial quotients 
in iong division. 

■ Shows howto correct errors. . . stepbystepapproach stresses 
accuracy. 

$13.95 in BASIC 

SPELLING TEACHER 

■ Teaches students their own word list . . . tape or disk files hold 
up to 200 words each. 

■ Suitable for any level from kindergarten to college. 

■ Misspelled words are retaught to reinforce correct spelling. 

■ Words presented in 4 lively formats - study, scrambled word 
game, trial test, final test. 

$12.95 in BASIC 




and 



'"■*■■ -A- ±'iL. -± -A. -L. "-4_ J- -A.' 



STATEMENT WRITER 

For use with (and requires) Disk Double Entry 

■ Produces statements suitable for billing from your Receivables 
accounts. 

■ Provides account summaries and mailing labels to use with 
your statements. 

■ Designed and documented to allow you to change formats to 
accommodate your own special needs. 

$34.95 in BASIC 



*■ *k .it.'ic-iii +.. '.it. ir it..it..:\ 



That's INTEREST-ing 

j Let your computer do some REAL computation! 

I ■ Helps you solve problems dealing with time, money, and 

j INTEREST! 

[ ■ AMORTIZATIONTABLESanywayYOUwantthem...evenlets 

you change any terms mid-schedule! 
i ■ Calculate Present Value, Future Value, Capital Recovery for 

any combination of payments you specify. 
j ■ Rate of Return computation predicts how hard yoUr money will 

be working for you! 
j ■ Computes Bond yields... current and to redemption. 
; ■ All answers available on screen or printer. 
j $29.95 in BASIC 



ir^^ ! ;S^|fe ■■*■ +..■+■. ■#'"'+' ■■*'■■'* '■*• ■*■■'■'*■■ 



ALPHA-DRAW 

j Works great with GRAPHIC SCREEN PRINT PROGRAM! 

j ■ Subroutine designed to let you add any keyboard character to 

your graphic displays. 
\ ■ You define X and Y coordinates and a string variable of one or 

more characters . . . ALPHA-DRAW does the rest! 
j ■ BONUS - includes instructions fora true line-numbered merge 

of tape files. 
j $8.95 in BASIC 






ALL PROGRAMS require Extended Color Basicand 
are delivered on cassette. All, except Tape Date- 
O-Base Calendar, are DISK System compatible. 

U.S.andCANADAadd$1.00perorderforshipping. 
Overseas $2.50 per order. All prices in U.S. dollars. 
Florida residents add 5% sales tax. Return within 
two weeks if not completely satisfied. 



/Pit 



RAINBOW 

C€ATmCAT»0« 
$£AL 

ALL LISTED 
PROGRAMS 
For VISA and Master Card orders: Include type, 
account number, expiration date, signature 
and phone number. Sorry! No COD's. 







ill! 

J 



Software Review: 



TSZ\ 



Release Earth From Alien 
Invasion In Galactic Fighter 



Earth has been invaded by aliens who have been forced 
to leave the planet Dracoz because of an agricultural 
shortage and overpopulation. You, as the pilot of the 
secretly developed ultimate spacecraft, are humankind's 
only hope for survival. 

That's the theme of Galactic Fighter, an arcade-quality 
space game developed and marketed by Four Star Software. 
And while neither the theme nor the action within the game 
are completely original, the graphics are good, the action 
is fast and the challenge is continuous. 

The invaders have used fusion bombs to destroy most 
of the earth. Cities have been obliterated to make room 
for fields. And survivors are being herded by the millions 
into prisons. Your mission is to deliver a device to Dracoz 
that will end the assault on Earth. 

Obviously, that's easier said than done because in order 
to get to the other planet, you're going to have to survive 
wave upon wave of flying objects — some of them natural 
debris that you'd expect to encounter in space, such as 
asteroids and meteors. Others take the shape of guided 
missiles, alien fighters and enemy transporters. 

As the game begins, you are given the option of setting 
the level of play — easy, medium and hard. You probably 
should start at the lowest level since all three levels are 



fairly difficult. You receive five turns per game, with an 
opportunity to earn an extra turn for every 25,000 points 
you put on the scoreboard. Points are allocated as follows: 
asteroids, 25; meteors, 50; missiles, 200; fighters, 250; 
transporters, 500. When you reach 25,000 points, you enter 
a laser trench. There's no relief there because the aliens 
have already arrived. 

Meteors and asteroids flow toward you continuously 
from the left side of the screen during your mission. Fighters 
usually appear first at the upper right-hand corner, cross 
the screen and then attempt to knock you out of the 
atmosphere — either with bullets or by bumping into you. 
From below missiles are launched, sometimes by the 
dozens. 

If things get too far out of control, you have an option 
of pressing the space bar to destroy all enemy objects on 
the screen. You can only use this option twice, however. 
There is a pause feature, but if you wait until an object 
is right upon you, it's going to get you sooner or later. 

The only thing working against Galactic Fighter is that 
it's the latest in a long, long line of space games. If that 
doesn't bother you, you will enjoy this challenging and 
nicely done effort. You may even spend hours trying to 
save the Earth like this reviewer did. 

(Four Star Software, P.O. Box 730, Streetsville, Ontario, 
Canada L5M 2C2, tape $19.95 U.S., $24.^5 CDN., disk 
$24.95 U.S., $29.95 CDN.) 

— Charles Springer 



128K THE EASY WAY 

AS SEEN IN DECEMBER '84 RAINBOW 



Fully compatible with Models 
'D', 'E', 'F\ & CoColl (USA) 
FULLY POPULATED LOGIC BOARD 

$39.95 

with instructions 

Logic Board with 64K Socketed Ram 



$109.00 



64K socketed memory required 
PLEASE SPECIFY BOARD WHEN ORDERING. 



SPECIAL 



10 SS/DD DISKS $10.00 per box 

128K SOFTWARE 

FHLXEX 99.95 

STAR DOS 1 28K 59.95 

PRO COLOR FILE 59.95 

1 28K DRIVE 3 24.95 

BASIC MEMORY MGMT. 39.95 

1 28K OS-9 IN MEMORY DRIVE 34.95 
DEALER ORDERS WELCOME 
SEND FOR FREE CATALOG 



DSL COMPUTER PRODUCTS INC. 

P.O. Box 1176, Dearborn, Mi. 48121 Phone:313-582-8930 

Michigan Residents add 4% Sales Tax to Order Please include $2.00 for S. & H. 



HJuilwCiwrt 



Detroit Metropolitan Area 
Vist Us at 4950 Schaefer near Michigna Ave. Dearborn 



In Canada you can order these 

items from: 

R&R COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

P.O BOX 7105 SANDWICH 

WINDSOR, ONT. N9C 321 

519-255-9113 




192 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Now from Falsoft, The RAINBOW MAKER, comes . . . 




The monthly magazine that's reader-friendly 

PCM has gone through quite a number of changes lately! We've extended our coverage to include 
the newest Tandy computers , increased our number of pages, and because our old name sounded 
a bit stuffy (" - The Magazine for Professional Computing Management"), we changed it to the 
more reflective and friendlier "PCM — The Personal Computing Magazine for Tandy Users. 1 ' 

Now, we cover five of the most exciting computers on the market , as well as the most productive 
— the highly popular Model 100; a brand new portable, the Tandy 200; and Tandy's new MS-DOS 
computers, the Tandy 2000, Tandy 1200 and Tandy 1000. 

FREE PROGRAMS! 

We learned from the rainbow that readers want programs to type in , so, each month we bring 
you an assortment of them, including games, utilities, business applications and graphics. 



BAR CODE, TOO! 



Also, pew Is the only computer publication in the world (that we know of) that brings you programs 
in bar code, ready to scan into memory with the sweep of a wand ! 

TUTORIALS GALORE 

Add to this our regular tutorials on telecommunicating, hardware and machine language, as well 
as basic programming tips and product reviews, and we think youll find we're one of the most 
informative and fun magazines on the market today. 

So if you're ready to add portability or step up to MS-DOS, stay with Tandy and the rainbow 
family through pcm. 



□ YES! Please send me a one year (12 issues) 
subscription to PCM for only $28/ A savings of 22% 
off the newsstand price. 



Name 



Address 



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ZIP 



In order to hold down costs, we do not bill. 

I I My check in the amount of 

Charge to my: LJviSA [^MasterCard 

Acct. # 

Signature 



is enclosed. 

I J American Express 

. Expiration Date- 



* Canadian subscribers add U.S. $7 Surface rate elsewhere $S5 Allow 5-6 weeks for first copy Kentucky residents add 5% sales tax. 
Mail to: PCM, The Falsoft Building, Prospect, K Y 40059 




>s Battle the 

of Disk Drives 



New Lower Price 

Un-DISK Drives $4&95? 

$34.95 

You Bet! There are empty spaces in your 32K 
and 64K CoCo. The Preble VDOS Un-DISK 
helps you fill them up with PROGRAMS! 



• Un-DISK uses your computers extra 
memory like a fasl disk drive 

• Un-DISK can store BASIC and MACHINE 
LANGUAGE programs, 

• Un-DISK IS INVISIBLE Yup! Un-DISK 
does not interfere with normal Color Com- 
puter Operation. 

• Un-DISK appears only when you type the 
magic word VDOS. 

• Un DISK comes with comprehensive in- 
structions which you may not need be- 
cause: 

• Un DISK is self-prompting and easy to 
use! 

• Un-DISK is provided on cassette. 

» Un-DISK is faster than a slow clumsy 
DISK DRIVE and best of all . . . 

• Un-DISK is CHEAPER than a DISK DRIVE! 

• Un-DISK will work even if you already own 
a disk but WHY BUY A DISK AT ALL? 

■ Un-DISK should be in the library of every 
senous CoCo user even if you own a disk 
says Frank J, Esser, independent reviewer 
for rainbow Magazine! 



OK sure, disk drives ARE NICE. I own one. 
But if your finances are limited h the Un-DISK 
can give you much of the power of the 
mechanical drive. Even if you already own a 
disk the Un-DISK can work like a super fast 
extra disk, 

EXTRA... EXTRA... EXTRA.,, EXTRA,.. 
Additional Power For $14.95 

Only with VDUMP for the Un-DISK? 

■ VDUMP lets you make a cassette backup 
copy of everything stored in the Un-DISK. 

• VDUMP lets you save 5. 10, 15 or more 
programs on a single cassette tape file. 

• VDUMP lets you switch Un-DlSKs. With a 
single load operation replace a group of 
financial programs with a set of children's 
programs. (The new VDUMP tape over- 
writes the old.) 

• VDUMP can allow you to save a whole lot 

of rai n bow on tape S n a S I NGLE file. 

• VDUMP is the perfect companion to the 
Preble VDOS Un-DISK, 

Available from Doctor Preble's Programs, 
naturally! Bringing you fine Color Computer 
Products Since 1983! 




The Preble VDOS Un-DISK $34.95 

The Preble VDUMP. . $14.95 

Shipping & handling 

U.S. and Canada $1 .50 

or $5,00 to other foreign points 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 




Order From: 
Dr. Preble's Programs 

6540 Outer Loop 

Louisville, KY 4022a 

(502) 966-8281 

Canadians may order from Kelly Software 



Software Review i 



TfiZ\ 



Congress Takes You 
On A Presidential Quest 

By Theodore S. Arlington 

Leadership of Congress is one of the most challenging 
and important tasks of the American presidency. Yet many 
citizens have little understanding of the nature of this 
relationship. One way to learn about this part of the political 
world is to be elected to office and get on-the-job training. 
If that is more commitment than you can manage right 
now, a computer Simulation, such as the one written by 
Jeff Stevens of B-5 Software, is the next best thing. 

His program, appropriately called Congress, is not just 
a game or merely a teaching program. It is a true 
Simulation. When a computer program copies something 
from the real world with careful attention to the accurate 
reproduction of essential parts and their interrelationships, 
this is called a "Simulation.'' 

Congress requires 32K and Extended basic. I reviewed 
the disk version which loaded without any problems and 
can be backed up with normal procedures. The documen- 
tation is adequate, clearly written and includes hints on 
the use of the software as a teaching aid. 

The Simulation first gives the user a Hi-Res picture of 
the Capitol and some music; then comes an application 
form to apply for the presidency. This gives the computer 
information on the user and sets some variables in the 
Simulation, such as the president's party. The application 
has a place for the user to give his/her name, which allows 
the computer's responses to be personalized. 

The computer then asks the new president/ user to choose 
between two possible policies on each of a number of 
prominent political issues. These issues are current, but 
may seem dated to students in two or three years. In most 
cases, one of the choices offered on each issue is conservative 
and one is liberal, but these choices are not strategic. That 
is, if the Congress is overwhelmingly Democratic, then a 
president would find it easier to push liberal measures 
through than conservative ones. This is not the case here, 
as this element of strategy has been simplified away. The 
policy choices are merely to give the user the feeling of 
pushing policies he/she believes in. 

The user also chooses which party to join. This is an 
important choice, because the computer will determine the 
party lineup in each house of Congress by a random 
function at the beginning of each game, and the proportion 
in the president's party in each house largely (but not totally) 
determines success. The user has to choose a party before 
knowing the outcome of the election. 

All this is true to life in that party is the most important 
variable in presidential success in Congress and a president's 
party may do relatively well or badly in congressional 
elections. It would be nice if the program had a version 
in which one could pre-set the party proportions. Because 
the party division changes for each game, it is hard to 
tell which strategies are most effective. For example, in 
one round my party might be the minority in each house. 
I might make all the right stragetic decisions and still get 
a very low score. In the next round I might make wrong 
choices, but win because my party dominated both houses. 
While this is very realistic, it might not aid learning as 



much as a separate version which allows the setting of 
this important variable. 

The president/ player also gets to choose which of several 
states he/she wishes to bless with pork barrel benefits to 
help win support for the rest of the president's program. 
I assume that it is best to choose the most populous states, 
but I can't tell because the effect of party realistically wipes 
out the effect of pork barrel choices. This means I would 
have to play hundreds of games and record the results 
to detect the proper strategy — or sneak a look at the 
code. 

Then the game starts. Simple Y/N or numerical choices 
from a menu allow the president/ user to make choices. 
The program is interesting visually and includes good error 
trapping. For example, if the choices are T to '6' and 
one types anything else, it sounds a musical note and 
prompts one to try again. The only annoying feature is 
that between parts of the game and at the end the computer 
draws a Hi-Res picture of the American flag and plays 
one of several patriotic songs. One should be able to cut 
these musical interludes short by pressing enter. 

In play, the user must choose which policy to push first. 
There is no sign that this is a strategic choice, except that 
one might run out of time before everything is passed. 
Thus, the player might first push the policy he/she most 
favors. This would not yield more points, but might make 
a psychological difference. The Simulation realistically 
places time limits on the player, but this is not "real time." 
Rather there is a 24-month counter in the game to reflect 
the two-year term of Congress. As one tries to push pieces 
of legislation through the various parts of the legislature, 
this counter slowly ticks away. 

During the play, the computer tells you where your 



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.i^isii^MK>ap.progr.aim th^-iivili " ! 

i^P|^^^i^^^^Si^BS''' track "number-:-^ 
|||S|w||iIiil||H sector ' " : 

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an 7FC terror message, it irieans you are trying to 

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f|HENS=S-l:C 



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Eric Titenius 



mSSSBSSm 






June 1985 



THE RAINBOW 195 



legislation is in the congressional process. Thus, with 
repeated usage the player will learn the complicated 
procedures of the Congress. The programmer has, in part, 
simplified these procedures. One example is that most 
legislation can originate in either house, and most bills 
are introduced into both houses at the same time, but in 
Congress it is described as if a bill starts in the House 
of Representatives and then goes to the Senate. However, 
sometimes action in committee is so fast that the player 
cannot really tell what is going on and appreciate the 
process. (Subcommittees and the Rules Committee in the 
House of Representatives are simplified out of existence.) 

Occasionally, the process stops and the computer asks 
whether the player wants to use one of the favors that 
members of Congress owe to reduce the number of 
amendments to a bill, discourage new amendments, or help 
passage. These prerogatives or tools for persuasion are 
limited in number. Thus, the president/user learns the value 
of conserving resources to gain maximum advantage. If 
the president's party has sufficient support in both houses 
and he/she uses these resources properly, then some bills 
will get through Congress with few amendments. 

This success determines the score. The rate is 100 points 
per bill for a maximum of 500 points. Less than 100 points 
is awarded if Congress attached more than five amendments 
to a bill. After 10 amendments, one actually loses points 
if the bill is signed or passed over a veto. Deciding whether 
to sign a bill with five to ten amendments or veto it is 
realistically tricky, but the Simulation could be better if 
the threat of veto could be applied earlier. 



BASIC COMPILER 

KLBASIC 1.0 - BASIC COMPILER 

WASATCHWA.RE is pleased to introduce what we feel 1b the most 
c omprehensive BASIC Compiler available for the Color Computer. 
This BASIC compiler, called MLBASIC, is for programmers who want 
to create wachine lanftuaRe from BASIC programs. Written in 
machine language, MLBASIC will prove to be the most powerful 
utility on your shelf, 

COMMANDS SUPPORTED 

1. I/O -Commands 

CLOSE CLOADM CSAVEM DIR DRIVE DSKI $ 

DSKOS FIELD FILES GET INPUT KILL 

LSET OPEN PRINT PUT RSET 



2. Program Control Commands 
CALL END EXEC 

GOSUB GOTO I F 

ON.. GO RETURN STOP 



FOR STEP 

THEN ELSE 

SUBROUTINE 



NEXT 

ERROR 



Math Functions 
ABS ASC 
EXP FIX 
LOC LOF 
SGN SIN 



ATN 
INSTR 
PEEK 
SGR 



COS CNV EOF 

INT LEN LOG 

POINT PPOINT RND 

TAN TIMER VAL 



4. String Functions 

CHRS INKEYS LEFTS 
STRS STRINGS 

5. Graphic/Sound Commands 

COLOR CLS CIRCLE 
PCLEAR PCLS PLAY 
RESET SCREEN SET 

6. Other/Special Commands 

DATA DIM LLIST 

REM RESTORE RVN 

DST IBSHFT LREG 

REAL SREG SWP 



DRAW 

PMODE 

SOUND 



MOTOR 
TAB 
PCOPY 
VECTD 



LINE PAINT 
PRESET PSET 



POKE 
VERIFY 
PMODD 
VECTI 



READ 

DLD 

PTV 



WASATCHWARE believes that the 6609 based microcomputer 1b 
powerful enotiRh to warrant such a compiler. MLBASIC is a "ASIC 
compiler that nllows structured programs (using SUBROUTINE? J, 
full floating point arithmetic and other features not available 
with Interpreter Basic programs. 



Tape- $69.95 
Disk- S69.95 
Both- S74.95 



64K Required 



WasatchWare 



7350 Nutree Drive 
hainbw Salt Lake City, Utah 
"'Itr* 84121 

Add $4.00 Postage and Handling Call (801) 943-6263 

Send check or Money order. 

No C.O.D.. Utah res. add 5% tax. 



For example: "The committee tells me that they can pass 
your bill with six amendments. Will you sign such a bill?" 
The player would then have to decide whether to take this 
"half a loaf or threaten veto and try to get a better deal 
by using some owed favor. This illustrates my main criticism 
of the program: that the president is too much of bystander 
to the process. He/she makes decisions to affect the 
outcome only sporadically. This feature is true to life, but 
it serves to teach the frustrations of the presidency at the 
expense of greater learning about how presidents persuade 
members of Congress, and other political actors, to go 
along. 

When the president/ player gets all of his/her legislation 
passed or runs out of time, the computer tallies up the 
score. It then compares the performance to that of other 
presidents. If you do very poorly, it compares you to Jimmy 
Carter and suggests that your popularity is comparable 
to that of Nixon during Watergate or Johnson during the 
Vietnam War. If you do somewhat better, you may be 
compared to Jefferson or Truman. 

My suggestions for improvement should not imply that 
this is a bad piece of software. On the contrary, Congress 
is a super program. It simulates and teaches some very 
important political concepts: Congressional procedures, 
conservation of political resources, importance of party 
support, allocation of resources, the importance of big 
states, the feeling of helplessness as Congress works over 
programs, and the fact that the opportunity for presidential 
influence is sporadic. Moreover, it is interesting and fun 
to play, at least for a while. 

It should be used, however, in the manner suggested 
in the documentation. It is of limited use if a teacher just 
gives it to a student and says "Here, go play with this 
and be quiet." The student needs to talk the strategies over 
with other students and be led by a knowledgeable 
instructor. When used in this way, I think Congress is 
appropriate, as the manufacturer suggests, in any grade 
from junior high school and up. It would even work at 
the state university where I teach. If I could only get 
Congress to approve more money to buy additional CoCos! 



(B-5 Software, 1024 Bainbridge Place, Columbus, OH 

43228, cassette $29.95, disk $31.95) 



One-Liner Contest Winner: . .,;■■■■ 

This one-liner will, whenever you input a command, 
produce what looks like a cold start. It will run oil 
any CoCo, but you should modify it to match the 

^j§&rn§>tt|S 



1 CLS : PRINT "DISK EXTENDED COLOR 
BASIC l.j3 COPYRIGHT (C) 1981 B 
Y TANDY UNDER LICENSE FROM M 
ICROSOFT": PRINT: PRINT" OK" :LINEIN 
PUT" " ; L$ : CLS : FOR T=lT015j3^ : NEXT 

Tampa.FL 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry* the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainhvw Book Of Simulations and its companion Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



196 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



Tt^\ 



VIEW II: Slow Scan TV At A 
Price That Can't Be Beat 



If the true reason were known for my interest in 
computers, especially the CoCo, 1 would have to use ham 
radio as a starting point. I have said all along that in 
addition to having one of the most advanced micropro- 
cessors, the CoCo's peripheral ports are there, limited only 
by the programmer's ingenuity. Needless to say, when I 
received the VIEW II package for review, I was elated 
at the prospect of transmitting and receiving SSTV (Slow 
Scan Television) just by a direct connection between my 
ham transceiver and my cassette port. 

Actually, this review covers two separate products. VIEW 
II is the software necessary to convert your CoCo into 
an 8,5 second black-and-white slow scan transceiver. The 
Coco Grey is a hardware modification to the CoCo that 
allows a Hi-Res screen of 128 by 128 pixels with 16 gray 
levels. 

Another product, called View-Edit, consists of a package 
of image generation and enhancement utilities that allows 
editing of all types of graphics information. View-Edit will 
be reviewed at a later date. 

To use VIEW II, you must have a 64K CoCo and at 
least one disk drive. A monitor is necessary for the Coco 
Grey as it provides composite video out. 

As you may know, there are a few packages on the market 
for the reception of SSTV with the CoCo. They all require 
extensive modification to the CoCo in the way of external 
hardware. With the VIEW //software, you just input SSTV 
audio onto your cassette port and watch the picture appear 
on your screen. Sending a picture is just as easy; just plug 
the output of your CoCo into your transmitter. 

There are several utilities for storing and retrieving 
pictures from disk. If a picture is received that you really 
like, saving it to disk is a snap. Conversely, the pictures 
you wish to send can be loaded from a menu-driven routine 
that allows picture selection by the touch of one key. All 
of the features of VIEW II can be accessed by either the 
keyboard or a joystick. 

One nice feature of VIEW II is a digital zoom feature. 
Upon selecting zoom, a one-quarter size rectangle appears 
allowing you the choice of which part of the picture you 
wish to enlarge. It is fun to watch the process as it is 
accomplished on the screen. 

Another utility allows screen dumps of the image in 
memory. Drivers are included for Epson, PMC and DMP 
printers. We used the Epson driver for a Gemini-lOX and 
it worked fine. 

With VIEW II you are given the software to convert 
images produced by the Micro Works DS-69 Digisector 
to a VIEW II format. This is nice for live pictures, or 
maybe snatching screens from TV or video tapes. The 
images can then be stored in the VIEW II format. 

The standard Hi-Res screen of the CoCo can only 
produce five levels of gray. This is OK, but not acceptable 
for most video information. To remedy this situation, 



SoftCircuits has designed a hardware board using advanced 
real-time video enhancements to provide 16 gray levels. 

The board measures 2.5 by 2.9 inches and fits on a 
piggyback socket arrangement on top of the 6847 VDG 
chip. I have an 'E' Board and had to permanently remove 
part of the top shield for the connection to the VDG. 
Elaborate instructions are given on installation on the 
various CoCo boards. 

The VIEW II software is the actual SSTV package, but 
it is greatly enhanced by the Coco Grey. Pictures were 
actually sent and received with this combination. Several 
demo pictures are provided on the disk which attest to 
the quality of video that is possible. I am not trying to 
say this is the best SSTV receiver I have seen, since 
obviously the filtering on some commercial units is far 
superior to the zero crossing detector used in the CoCo. 
At the same time, from an economic standpoint, it can't 
be beat. I'm on slow scan now for less than $150 and can 
do things with pictures that people with 10 times that 
amount invested can't do! 



(SoftCircuits, 401 S.W. 75th Terrace, North Lauderdale, 
FL 33068, VIEW II disks $24.95 each, VIEW-EDIT disks 
$24.95 each, CoCo Grey $100) 



— Dan Downard 




Finally, a newsletter that will keep 
you up to date on the latest Color 
Computer Developments. 

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 

□ Yes, enter my subscription to UNDERCOLOR 

□ 1 year $33.00 □ 2 years $66.00 
Canada/Mexico 

□ 1 year $47.00 □ 2 years $94.00 
Overseas 

D 1 year $53 US dollars 

□ Airmail $65 US dollars 



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Address . 



City. 



. State . 



Zip. 

Mail to: ColorPlus, Box 6809, 

Roxbury, VT 05669 or 

call (802)485-6440 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 197 



Software Reviewl 



ColorStat — A Good Statistical 
Program For Beginners 

By J.B. Garner 

I have taught, researched and consulted in statistics since 
1961, and for the last 12 months I have been using my 
CoCo to perform statistical calculations on small data sets. 
Color BASIC contains good mathematical subroutines and 
is an easy, flexible language with which to program 
(especially when enhanced by the J&M DOS). With CoCo, 
I have been able to perform logistic regression and other 
routines which some well-known mainframe statistical 
packages, such as SPSS (Version 8) are unable to do. 

ColorStat is a small program on tape which enables the 
user to construct a data file of limited size and then perform 
various limited statistical calculations on the data it 
contains. 

The uses of the program are very clearly explained in 
a well-produced 49-page manual. This manual is about 
the clearest and best produced I have seen. However, it 
explains how to use the program, not how to understand 
the program's output. 

The first menu offers data file maintenance, descriptive 
statistics, frequency distribution and histogram, correlation/ 
linear regression (and the paired sample t-test), prediction 
from this regression equation, multiple regression (with two 
independent variables), and analysis of variance for the 



T 



I ' | I I ■ I ' 



FUNDGRAF-A STOCK 

MARKET ANALYSIS 

PROGRAM FOR 16K EX 

TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER - 



STOCK & FUND INVESTING 

with the 

TRS-80* COLOR COMPUTER 

USE FUNDGRAF AND FUNDFILE 

FUNDGRAF is a stock market analysis program that not only graphs and 
analyzes funds or stocks, but also makes decisions on when to BUY and SELL. 
Improve market timing using your COCO, 

GRAPHS fund's progress (up to 200 
weeks). SUPERIMPOSES for comparison: 
a line of constant percent growth or a 
graph of any other fund (or stock). 
CALCULATES over any time span: the 
percent price change and the moving 
average (any span). INDICATES BUY 
and SELLsignals. FUNDGRAF requires 
16 K ECB min. 

16/32 K Tape $49.95 

16/32 K 5 in. Disk $69.95 

ADD $2 handling on all orders. 

FUNDFILE is a portfolio and account management program for securities. 
Manage single or multiple portfolios' of stocks, mutual funds, bonds, money 
market funds etc. FUNDFILE allows easy maintenance of all your records for 
accurate portfolio evaluation. NEW 32 K VERSION of FUNDFILE summarizes 
all transactions (dividends, interest, purchases and sales) between any two 
dates of your choice ■ weekly, yearly, etc. Categorizes interest and dividends paid 
as to tax liability (tax free, etc.) and capital gains as long or short term. Great for 
tax reports. 

FUNDFILE REQUIRES 16 K ECB min. and 80-COL PRINTER. 

5-in. Diskette only for 16 K ECB $27.95 

5-in. Diskette only for 32 K ECB $37.95 

ADD $2 handling on all orders. 

ffIS$ Write for free brochure for details. Dealer inquiries invited. 

RAINBOW 

PARSONS SOFTWARE, DEPT. G 

118 WOODSHIRE DRIVE 

PARKERSBURG, WV 26101 




one-way experimental design. The data file maintenance 
section guides the user on how to prepare a new file, rename 
the present file, rename a variable, add records to a file, 
display, update, print a file, read a file from tape and to 
write a file to tape. 

Files are produced in the usual statistical layout by 
placing the data into a rectangular array with rows 
representing subjects, such as people or animals, and 
columns representing the variables, such as age, weight, 
height measured on each subject. The program describes 
each row as a "record," and carefully guides the user to 
make an appropriate data file. 

In the 16K version of the program, a DIM statement 
in the first line limits the user to 75 records of six variable 
values each. On the reverse side of the tape, a 32K version 
of the program appears identical, apart from lines 1 and 
9500, allowing 500 records of six variables each. With some 
tenacity, these limits may be altered by the user. 

The program is written in BASIC and may be placed on 
disk, listed, copied or altered without any problems. The 
only time a POKE statement is used is to determine whether 
the printer is ready. The use of BASIC allowed me to see 
exactly how each calculation was performed and to be able 
to make this review more helpful to the reader. 

If you wish to use a disk, you should change the device 
number of certain input and output statements; if you wish 
to print the histogram or scatterdiagram on the CGP-115, 
you must remember to switch to the 80-column mode (as 
these diagrams are printed by means of X's and zeros). 
All program output may be switched to a printer to give 
a permanent version, as may a copy of each record. 

In trying to use the program without reading the manual 
the only difficulties I had were the abbreviations "DV" 
for the dependent or outcome variable, and "IV" for the 
independent or input variable. 

The output for descriptive statistics gives the mean 
(average), sum, sum of squares (not the more usual sum 
of squared deviations!), standard deviation (divisor N), 
standard deviation (divisor N-l), the minimum and the 
maximum, for any selected variable. 

The output does not give the sample size, the standard 
error of the mean or the name (or number) of the relevant 
variable. The distribution/ histogram choice gives a 
frequency distribution in, at most, five (equally spaced) 
cells and a corresponding block diagram in attractive colors. 
The axes of the block diagram do not contain any labeling. 
The manual advises this may be added by means of the 
GRAPHIC package (Cat. No. 26-3157/Cat. No. 26-3251). 
The correlation/ linear regression selection gives the 
means of the two variables, the correlation between them 
and the slope and y-intercept of the regression of y (the 
DV) on 'x' (the IV). It does not give the t-test value for 
the correlation (slope), the sample size, the standard error 
of the slope or the standard deviation of the scatter about 
the regression line. On the other hand, if 'y' and 'x' were 
paired samples (such as scores on the same people before 
and after treatment), the program does print out the value 
of the relevant paired t-test and its degrees of freedom. 
A Lo-Res scattergram with or without a plot of the 
regression line is available. The prediction selection, made 
after the correlation selection, prints out the predicted 'y' 
value for any 'x' value you may wish to input. The standard 
errors of these predictions are not given. 

Choosing multiple regression enables you to regress one 
variable on two others. In this section the printout is 



198 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



essentially complete. Unfortunately, as it stands there is 
a flaw in the program. Using the data given in the manual, 
namely four records containing age, sex and income, and 
repeatedly running the multiple regression of age on sex 
and income, I obtained a different equation on each 
occasion! The problem is that one accumulating variable, 
X2(6), is not cleared to zero before use. Change J=l TO 
5 to J=l TO G in Line 8500 to remove the difficulty. 

The final selection enables the user to obtain a one-way 
analysis of variance together with the means and standard 
deviations of the separate treatment groups. Here the 
omission of the separate sample sizes is more of a difficulty, 
and in Line 6820 the denominator of the expression for 
the standard deviation appears incomplete, 'N' being 
written for (Nl(J)-l). The result is that the standard 
deviations given by the program are (very often) incorrect. 

Minor errors I have found in the manual are stating 
the filename to have a maximum of eight characters whereas 
the program, Line 265, allows 10: the DF BETWEEN in 
the table on Page 39 should have value one, not zero; 
the suggestion that data values may be up to 15 characters 
in length on Page 11 (Color BASIC stores about nine 
significant digits). The main drawback to the manual is 
the lack of a small appendix giving precise definitions to 
each term used in the various outputs. For example, the 
descriptions on the descriptive statistics section are not 
consistent with those used later. I had to work through 
the program in order to be clear about the definition of 
each term. 

Considerable care has been taken to make the screen 
appearance attractive and the creation of data files 
straightforward. Less care has been taken with the selection 
of presented statistics and the programming details. 

Statistics is now being taught in high schools, and with 
these two small programming errors corrected, this would 
be a useful accompanying program. It does not quite cover 
the curriculum of the usual college introductory statistics 
semester. 

Standard error of the mean, single sample t-tests, the 
binomial distribution and chi-square analysis of contingency 
tables are not contained in ColorStat. If the formulas for 
the output results had been given, then this would have 
been a very useful program for people attempting to learn 
statistics by themselves, as it would have removed the 
drudgery and allowed them to concentrate on the new ideas. 

(Radio Shack stores nationwide, cassette $34.95) 



jf^Sgl^^ ..":■■■ ■■ 

1# PMODE3 y lr 

(For this winning ..one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book Of Simulations and its coinpariion /?am6ow 



Software Review^ 



L7£\ 



CoCo Professional 

Tax Preparer 

Is An Excellent Tax Aid 

Are you tired of seeing your computer sit around doing 
nothing? Would you like to make some extra dollars by 
using your CoCo? Would you like to do your own taxes 
just like the professionals without paying the professionals? 

If you answered yes to any or all of the above questions, 
then you owe it to yourself to read on. 

Micro Data Systems has made available a program that 
can do all of the above. The program is called The CoCo 
Professional Tax Preparer and was designed by a tax 
consultant with 15 years experience. The program runs 
in 32K memory and requires one or two disk drives. The 
package consists of a professionally prepared one-inch 
notebook binder compiled of approximately 350 pages 
packed full of perfectly written documentation along with 
step-by-step examples. 

The manual is broken down into eight color-coded 
sections consisting of: General, Income, Adjustments, 
Itemized deductions, Tax computation, Credits, Other 
taxes, and Appendix. Whatever section you are in need 
of, it is just a matter of flipping straight to the section 
for a detailed description of that particular category. 

Also included in the package is a file containing all of 
the government income tax forms. An added extra is a 
book called Miller's Personal Income Tax Guide (a $7.95 
value). This book offers detailed step-by-step worksheets 
that take you line by line through complex tax calculations, 
which is ideal for the beginner who has never completed 
a tax form before. Together with the program and the 
tax preparation book, it makes income tax calculating a 
breeze. 

The program consists of four diskettes, three program 
disks and one data disk. All disks are not copy-protected, 
which allows the user to make backup copies. After 
initiating the system, the program will prompt you with 
entering one or two drives. If two drives are entered, you 
can then place program disk #1 in Drive 1 and the data 
disk in Drive 2. If only one drive is selected, you must 
switch the program disk and the data disk as the program 
requests. 

After you have completed the above section you will 
be asked to input one of the following: review of a tax 
return, new tax return or print return. If you select "review 
return," you will be presented with the main menu. You 



^CANADIAN PAYROLL* 



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...A DEFINITE ABBET TO AMV COHPANY • 



.IB FUR YOU HO CHANCE OF UNKNONINOLY 

LOSING DATA.... IB A SPECIALIZED PRODUCT.. 

MANUAL NELL ORBANIZED EASY TO FOLLOW!' 

^h=—«^2^ X r4CES ■* TERRITDRIE8*AUTO. S . X . N VALIDATION 
* FORMATTED BCREENBVFUL.U FORMAT TftAPPINO*ANY PRINTER 
KANY RAY PER I DDSBATCHED CHEC3UE0 *DETAILED F 

'TOTAL COBTXDLJTY ALLOCAT I DNS* YEARLY LIBER UF _ 

KALL MEDIA TRANBFER*BACK-UPPABLE*PABSWORD RROTEGTKD 

MPUTER/TDPlOO/aiNeLE E> I SK 

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(ONTARIO REBIDEMTS ADD 7X P,S.T> 



3TUBE 



YGS 



F=-o BOX 20B 
BRECHIN, ONTARIO 
LOK 1BO 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 199 



will be asked to place an 'X' beside all of the categories 
you wish to review. The program will then review any of 
the categories that you have selected. 

If you chose "new return," you will again be presented 
with the main menu and be asked to place an 'X' beside 
all categories which pertain to your return. After you have 
selected the categories that best suit your return, the 
program will interview you in an organized fashion, 
beginning with the heading information and proceeding 
step by step through all income, adjustments and 
deductions, then proceed to compute your taxes. Based 
on these inputs, the balance due or refund will be computed, 
very much the way a professional tax preparer or CPA 
would do. 

After all of the information is completed, you will have 
the option to print your return. The printer function will 
print all data on government-approved forms. Included 
in the package are some carrier strips which will enable 
you to attach non-tractor feed forms so they may be printed. 

The program has a unique diagnostic mode built into 
it. In other words, before the computer writes any 
information to the disk, it will go into the diagnostic mode 
to be sure all of the data that was input is correct. If it 
comes across a piece of information that is not correct, 
it will give an error code and the user must then go to 
the appendix of the manual where there is a listing of 94 
error codes. The error code will tell you exactly what the 
problem is and how to correct it. The error must be 
corrected in order for the program to continue. This 
measure guards against bad data being input which would 
produce a bad tax return. 



As a reviewer, I make it a habit to call the company 
offering the software to make sure everything I see is what 
the customer will receive when purchasing the software. 
My conversation with Micro Data Systems was not only 
a pleasure but most enjoyable. Micro Data's main concern 
is offering fine quality software and excellent product 
support, meaning that if you have any problems with your 
software, you can write or call for help and be assured 
of complete satisfaction. They also assured me that the 
new package now available has been improved, offering 
a much better tax preparation program. 

In the back of the manual, you will find an order form 
to order extra forms; also included is a registration form 
to be filled out and returned so the user will be informed 
on updates and enhancements. Yearly updates are available 
for $59.95. 

For those of you who have experience with doing tax 
forms, I think you will find this a masterpiece and a valuable 
part of your software library. For those of you who do 
not have any experience in income tax calculating, I feel 
you owe it to yourself to learn how the right way. 

I would like to thank Micro Data Systems for making 
such a fine and high quality piece of software available 
for our good old Color Computer. I found it a pleasure 
to review. 

(Micro Data Systems, 6 Edward Drive, Ashland, MA 01721, 

$149.95) 

— Bob Brown 



□□□□□ 

nnnnn 

O" 






BBBBB SjaDCQKPt 



COLOR COMPUTERS 



CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-248-3823 



COLOR COMPUTER, DISK DRIVE AND PRINTERS 



COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 



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PRICE PRICE 

26-3136 16K Extended Color Computer 2 $ 159.95 $ 130.00 

26-3127 64K Extended Color Computer 2 219.95 185.00 

26-3129 Disk Drive for Color Computer 349.95 290.00 

26-1161 Disk Drive 1,2, 3 for Color Computer 279.95 230.00 

26-1276 DMP-10580cpsDotMatrix 199.95 169.00 

26-1271 DMP-1 10 50/25 cps Triple Mode Printer 399.95 299.00 

26-1255 DMP-120120cps Dual Mode Matrix 499.95 385.00 

26-1208 Computer Cassette Recorder 59.95 50.00 



LIST OUR 

PRICE PRICE 

Telewriter 64 Tape $ 49.95 $ 42.00 

Telewriter 64 Disk 59.95 49.00 

VIP Writer 69.95 59.00 

VIP Database 59.95 49.00 

VIP Terminal Disk 49.95 45.00 

VIP Integrated Software 149.95 139.00 

RADIO SHACK Software 15% Off 

TOM MIXSoftware CALL 



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PRICE PRICE 

EPSON LX-80 Printer $ 369.95 $ 275.00 

OKIDATA 82 Printer 349.00 295.00 

STAR SG-10 Printer 399.00 265.00 

COMREX CR-II Daisy Wheel Printer 499.00 400.00 

C.ITOH 7500 Prowriter Printer 289 00 225.00 

BOTEK Serial to Parallel Interlace 59.00 49.00 



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PRICE PRICE 

COMREX 12" Green Monitor $ 119.00 $ 95.00 

COMREX 12" AmberMonitor. . . 129.95 110.00 

COMREX 13" Color Monitor 329.95 285.00 

AMDEK 300A Monitor 199.95 155.00 

VIDEO PLUS Monitor Adaptor CALL 

Teknika RGB/Composite Color Monitor 399.00 299.00 



COLOR ACCESSORIES 



LIST 
PRICE 

26-2226 RS-232 Program Pak $ 79.95 

26-3012 Deluxe Joystick (EACH) 39.00 

26-3017 64K RAM Kit 69.95 

26-3008 Joysticks 24.95 

26-301 6 Keyboard Kit 39.95 



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26-3018 Extended Basic Kit $ 39.95 $ 34.00 

26-1175 Direct-Connect Modem I 99.95 85.00 

26 -11 73 Direct-Connect Modem II 199.95 169.00 

Signalman Modem 300/1 200 Baud 399.00 275.00 

Hayes Modems 185.00 



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PERRY COMPUTERS • 124 SOUTH MAIN STREET • PERRY, Ml 48872 



J 



200 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



Sam Sleuth P.I. Is An 
Extraordinary Case 

When I opened the package and saw the game I had 
received for review, I said, "Golly gee, another Adventure 
program." But, when I proceeded to read the instructions 
and load the game, I found out that Sam Sleuth PJ. is 
anything but your usual Adventure game. 

Sam Sleuth PJ. is a 32K graphics Adventure program 
available on disk or cassette tape. One joystick is required. 

The scenario is as follows: You are Sam Sleuth, Private 
Investigator. Your job is to investigate one of three different 
cases. The case levels and descriptions are described as 
Novice, Experienced and Expert. 

Level 1) Novice — The Case of the Missing Cat: You 
have been out of work for quite some time. As you sit 
passing the time away, Shirley Voff, the local school 
teacher, comes into your office. She wants you to locate 
a cat she had been asked to watch that is now missing. 

Level 2) Experienced — The Mystery at the Museum: 

The day after you find the cat, you get a call from Rick 

Anthers, the museum owner. Rick tells you that a valuable 

statue has been stolen from the museum. He says he had 

borrowed the statue from another museum and it wasn't 

insured, which means if Rick doesn't get the statue back, 

he will have to pay for it. Your job is to find the thief, 

and the statue. 
^» — — — — — — — — — -____ ^ 

/ COCO DOS FLEX OS-9 X 

DEVELOPMENT TOOLS 

C COMPILER 

• generate, fast efficient code 

• longs, floats, most operators 
FLEXS59.95 OS-9 $59.95 COCO DOS $49.95 

RASMB (relocatable macro assembler) 

• assembler, linker, library builder 

• links only needed functions 
FLEX $59.95 OS-9 $59.95 COCO DOS $49.95 

CTRM HI RES OS-9 WINDOWS 

• 52X24 hi-res display 

• multi-window displaying and running 
OS-9 only $29.95 

SOLVE (SYMBOLIC DEBUGGER) 

• debug using symbols, assembler, disassembler 

• single stepping, multi-breakpoints, etc. 

• easy to use /understand 
os-9 only $75.00 

MATH PACK 

• complete math package (sine, cosine, square root, etc.) 

• requires rasmb or introl c 
RASMB version $49.95 introl version $75.00 

PC09-F (read/write IBM PC diskette) 

• directory command 

• copy command to/from IBM diskette 
FLEX OS-9 COCO DOS $34.95 

PC09 P,F,X (bridges the gap between 6809 systems and IBM PCs) 

• connects the two systems together using many 
different options 

• write for further details, pricing, availability 

DUGGER'S GROUIinGSsVSTEmS 

Add $3 for shipping, foreign add 15%. Post Office Box 305, Solana Beach, 

visa ancfivic welcomed. Sorrv NO C.O.D. CA 92075 (619) 755-4373 

California orders add 6%. Technical information 6AM-8AM pst only 

For more information write or call. Business hours 8AM-5PM PST 

TRADEMARK— FLEX (TSO 0S-9 (MICROWARE) IBM PC (IBM) INTROL C (INTROL) 



Level 3) Expert — Baffling Bank Robbery: Rip Voff, 
the owner of the bank, has heard about the good job you 
did for his wife, Shirley. He hires you to find the thief 
who robbed the bank. 

One unique feature of this game is that the commands 
can be entered through a joystick. Commands are entered 
by positioning a cursor over an icon describing one of 
the several alternatives at your disposal. 

Other features include graphics showing your walk to 
a telephone booth. You can flip through the pages of the 
phone book using the joystick. When you get to the number 
you want, you press the firebutton and it will dial that 
number. There is even a ring or a busy tone. 

Another feature is that you can walk to your car, drive 
it all over town while you see the car moving through 
the streets on your screen, and even have a wreck if you're 
not careful. 

I thought the documentation of this game was excellent. 
The manual tells you everything you need to know about 
the game, and it even shows you a street map of the whole 
town with all of the businesses and houses. 

I liked this game thoroughly and give it a five out of 
five stars. It has all the features of a good Adventure, with 
the bonus of excellent graphics, sound and game-like 
response while driving your car. 

(Computerware, P.O. Box 668, Encinitas, CA 92024, tape 
$24.95, disk $27.95) 

— Pat Downard 



^c 



Full 
Character Set 

FOR 

CoCo or CoCo2 



% 



Easy to install board adds: 

• All 96 Standard ASCII Characters 

• Upper & Lower Case Displayed Simultaneously 
with NO Inverse Video 

• True Lower Case Descenders 

• Braces & Vertical Bar Characters 

• Slashed Zero 

• Other Features 

Board is hardware driven and requires NO software 
drivers. NO effect on any memory. 
Enhances CoCo screen for: 

• OS-9 Operating System Programming 

• "C" Language Programming y*—*^ 

• Word Processing Uf\\ 

• Communications Terminal Modes rainbow 

__,_.,_ ^ CERTIFICATION 

PRICE $38.00 

(+$2.00 shipping/handling if charge) 

CoCo Devices 

Box 677, Seabrook, TX 77586 

713—474—3232 

Visa (Specify CoCo or CoCo2) Mastercard 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 201 



Software Review! 



Create Your Own 
Fashions With DESIGNER 

DESIGNER is a recent release from the Cognitive 
Development Company, It is developed for the 32K Color 
Computer with Extended Color BASIC. With this type of 
software, it is apparent the Cognitive Development 
Company is in the business of providing software for young 
people that will aid in the growth of certain skills and 
visual perceptions. 

DESIGNER is for girls of all ages and teaches not only 
fashion design, but also teaches computer skills in a non- 
threatening way. This is of particular value in that concern 
has been expressed in the educational community regarding 
the lack of computer use by the female population. 

Very simply put, DESIGNER is a computer "paper doll." 
Once the program disk is inserted and run, a color test 
is given. The program is extrememly friendly and can be 
used without any fear of messing up anything. The main 
menu gives you four choices: Design Fashions, Design 
Fabrics, Check Closet and Finished. You select the choice 
using the arrow keys and pressing ENTER. 

"Design Fashions" is done very simply. You select what 
style of neckline, sleeve, skirt or pants you desire. You 
can select one at a time with nine choices given in each 
category. If you do not like a particular choice, then change 
it. All selections are shown on the model immediately. When 
you are finished, you can select fabrics. 



There are 26 fabric pages and each page contains eight 
different fabrics. If you do not like what you see, you can 
design your own from the main menu. You select fabrics 
for the top, belt and bottom. Fabric selections include 
solids, horizontal stripes, vertical stripes, checks, 
houndstpoth, plaids, dots, white patterns and black/ white 
combinations. 

After finishing your design, you can store your creation 
in the "closet." Tn the "memory closet" there are 12 racks 
and each rack can hold three fashions. The racks are labeled 
A-L. As each rack is shown on the screen, you can replace 
a design, go to the next rack or go back to the main menu. 
If you do not save your design, it will be lost! 

"Designing Fabrics" is the most complicated task in the 
program. However, the instruction manual is sufficient to 
lead you through the process. You have 26 design pages 
with eight patterns on each page for a total of 208 patterns. 
Any of these patterns can be changed. You do not have 
to design any fabrics to use the program, but this is a 
nice option. 

The instruction manual suggests various projects: Design 
fashions for various activities such as swimming, prom date, 
golfing, day at the office, gardening and school event. 
Design a wardrobe for a particular person for an entire 
week, including pajamas and dates. Discover the role and 
use of fabrics on certain designs by putting the same designs 
in the same closet with different colors and types of fabrics. 

Cognitive Development Company should be congratu- 
lated for developing such fine educational software. The 
graphics are exceptional and the ease of operation is 
masterful. DESIGNER would fit in the library of any home 
and in the classroom as well. Their motto is very 
appropriate: "Fun Things for the Mind!" 



fMCXUS presents 
New Keys to Creativity! 



CHROMA-SKETCH 

The Picture PrfgraM Writer 

CHROMA-SKETCH has an option that writes a BASIC 
program as you draw, paint and letter an the hi-res 
screen in 66 colon and shadings (22 in each 
of 3 color-sets). Save program to disk or tape to 
recreate your picture from BASIC at any time, or 
save the screen as a binary image. 
Dual cursors simplify arcs, circles, lines and boxes. 
Drawing aids include' options for full-sewn crosshair 
cursor and "graph-paper" grid. Automatic preview 
and undo commands available in 64K. Halp key 
gives command and status display. If the program 
writer is enabled, you can return to any previous 
stage of your picture! 

Draw complex shapes and CHROMA-SKETCH will 
redraw, rotate, reduce or enlarge them at any position 
in any color or pattern. Save -the shape definitions 
to disk or tape for use in BASIC programs. Paint 
tn any dot pattern including checks, stripes {horizontal 
or vertical) or others you define yourself. Draw dotted 
or twisted lines. Overlay color patterns for translucent 
effects. 

CHROMA-SKETCH can be used with any combination 
of joystick devices including Touch-Pad or Color 
Mouse. If you prefer, you may use the fast, auto-repeat 
cursor keys to move diagonally, horizontally or vertically. 
The fast, compact graphic programs you can write 
using CHROMA-SKETCH are yours tq alter or use 
in any way you wish. These BASIC programs may 
be used for games, graphic adventures, educational 
software or on-screen slide shows. 
Requires 32K Extended BASIC. Supports disk or 
cassette systems, ell ROM versions, all graphic modes. 

CHROMA-SKETCH 



WIZARD f . 

For Telewriter-64* 

•I recommend Wit 3rd lor Telewriter devotees 
who want to do something nice for^their hard- 
working word processor.' 

Scott Norman 

Hot Coco. Feb. '85 

offers the eyes alter Ipng periods ot key- 
hoarding. "Wizard is another CoCo winner ' 
Charles Springer 

The pleasantly proportioned characters of the WIZARD 
font have true descenders and otrtional end-of-line 
markers It' you do not prefer this clear, attractive 
font, take advantage of our money back guarantee 
The simple modification ot Tetewriter-64 done by 
WIZ causes no change in the operation of the word 
processor or the amount ol buffer space You may 
choose to permanently install I he font in a backup 
copy ot TeJewnter-64 or to quickly install the fon! 
each time you load an unmodified copy of'TeJewri!er-64 
The end-of-line markers are useful lor locating, run-on 
spaces at the end of lines and between lutes, and 
for counting spaces between paragraphs They are 
essential tor the complex on-screen formatting that 
tables or poetry often involve, as well as tor keeping 
track of carriage returns in program code 
WIZ will run in any CoCo. 1G-64K, disk or cassette. 
The WIZARD font does not alter the characters 
produced by your printer 

Details of how the new font is added to Telewriter-64 
may be requested when you order WIZ Previous 
purchasers may request this information it they include 
their WIZ ID # andaSAS'E 



MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. If not completely satisfied, you may return the material within 30 days for a 
prompt refund. Specify the program and media desired. Programs supplied on disk and cassette are identical 
in all respects. Send check or money order. Personal checks — no delay. Next day shipping in most cases. 

NEXUS 

P.O. Box 8303 
Midland, TX 79708 

COD add $5.0U 

Tetewri!er-S4 is a trademark of Copitec 



for additional information-. CIS 71575,1706 
Write for a catalog. Dealer inquiries are wejeome. 



202 



(Cognitive Development Company, Suite 141, 1234S Lake 
City Way, NE, Seattle, WA 98125, disk only, $24.95) 

— J.D. Ray 



One~Liner Contest Winner . . 




IJZf : SOUND 147 , 7 ? CLS !','.( 4) 



i FORX*=lTO1.0j3 : NEXT : RESTORE : FORT=l 
,,-___ — __ . ^^:Reada;b:SOUNDA,B:N 



EXT : RESTORE : FORX-1TQ100 : NEXT : NEX 
T:FORL=lT04 :READA,B: SOUNDA, B:NEX 
T : RUN : DATA13 3 ,4 ,12 5,4, 108 , 4 , 174 , 
8 ,147 ,9/133", 4 ,125, 4 ,133 ,4 ,108 ,8 



Richard Davis Jr. 



||8S8$|^^ copies -"- : 

S^^^^^^^^MM^^^i^^S^M^ .companion. Muinhaw ' ' ' 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software ReviewZ 



CoCo Tuner — Fine 
Tuning With The CoCo 

It never ceases to amaze me how the Color Computer 
takes on more and more tasks. A unique new product came 
on the market this past December that permits one to use 
the Color Computer to assist in the tuning of pianos and 
other stringed instruments. I am not a piano tuner and 
really not terribly aware of what tuning aids are on the 
market, but I can assure you that this product is quite 
simple to use, and it seems to be a very viable way to 
do the job. 

The manual which comes with CoCo Tuner is more than 
adequate, and really quite unnecessary for getting your 
first taste of what the CoCo Tuner can do. Slip in the 
ROM pack and you have a menu on the screen that lays 
out all the features. Within a couple of minutes, you can 
try them and either be bored with the simplicity or pleased 
with your brilliance in figuring it out all by yourself. At 
any rate, if you now go beyond the the first two introductory 
paragraphs in the manual (probably trying to find out what 
that dancing black line is in the center of the screen) you 
will find the CoCo Tuner is not as simple as it first appears. 

The manual is a real gem; it's actually a physics lesson, 
piano tuning course and program manual all wrapped up 
in one. Before we get further into its contents, let me quickly 
review the CoCo Tuner's features. The program causes the 
computer to sound the notes of the scale at their precise 
pitch. By pushing the letters 'A' 'B' S C T>' *E' T' 'G,' you 
can sound the equivalent scale note (beginning with note 
'A' which is at the frequency of 220 hertz, for those of 
you who are technically minded). 

When the program starts, you are in octave four (fourth 
from the bottom of the piano keyboard) and you can change 
octaves by pushing the zero key. By pushing the up-arrow 
key or down-arrow key, you can get the sharp and flat 
notes, or you can continuously push the up-arrow key and 
proceed through the entire group of octaves. If you sound 
the 'A' pitch and find it matches none of your black keys 
or white keys but seems to be somewhere in one of the 
cracks, there are solutions for that, also. 

You can push the T' key and adjust the pitch by any 
given percentage you put in, or you can push the 'H' key 
and enter the exact number of cycles you want the pitch 
to have, which would not be any help for piano tuning, 
but rather is a feature put in for the sound laboratory 
engineers who have need for a precise frequency of their 
own choosing. 

From a program-function point of view, that's about 
it, except for that curious dancing black line, Which leads 
us back to the manual and the practical use of the CoCo 
Tuner in the piano-tuning trade. The CoCo Tuner ROM 
pack has a place to insert a high-impedance microphone. 
By permitting the TV sound being produced by the program 
to enter the microphone, the black bar in the center of 
the display should form a stationary pattern. If you turn 
off the TV sound and try humming the same note into 
the microphone, you should also be able to cause the black 
bar to form the same stable pattern. 

It is here that the fun begins. If you are flat, the bar 
slips to the left; it moves to the right if you are sharp. 
But that is only the beginning; if you sound a note exactly 



an octave away or harmonically related, the overtones can 
greatly confuse you in trying to judge if you have the correct 
stable pattern. This is a case of practice in interpreting 
the moving bar pattern. Even with my great lack of musical 
skill, 1 began to get the hang of it. 

Now perhaps you can see the whole picture. By setting 
the CoCo Tuner to a specific note and sounding that note 
on the piano, you can judge if the piano note has the right 
pitch by observing the black bar on the screen. The 
sensitivity and accuracy of the CoCo Tuner is really beyond 
what the human vocal chords can perform and beyond 
what one would need for any piano-tuning environment. 

The limiting factor in sensitivity, for example, is going 
to be the ambient interference noise rather than a failure 
to pick up the sound. As the manual says, the pitch accuracy 
may actually be too great for you when tuning some 
instruments, such as a guitar, where the bar may move 
to the right when the string is first plucked and then move 
to the flat side as the note dies out. This is normal for 
a guitar sound, but might drive you nuts if you insist on 
trying to match the CoCo Tuner pitch exactly. 

What do you want to know about sound or piano tuning? 
Be it diatonic scales, physics of pianos, theory of tuning, 
beat frequencies, use of rubber mutes, the art of handling 
a tuning lever, it is all there in the manual. You are definitely 
buying a lot more than a computer device when you 
purchase this product. I found the writing and topics in 
the manual interesting (even though I probably would never 
use the information on a practical level). 

The CoCo Tuner is produced by someone who cares 
and who knows the field of its intended use quite well. 

I tried to get some reaction from professionals in the 
field. I was concerned professionals might feel that the 
gimmickry of the CoCo Tuner would impinge upon what 
they thought of as the heart of their professional skills, 
but this is not the case according to those with whom I 
spoke. The fairly wide use of strobe-type tuning assistance 
has already put the profession at ease with sophisticated 
aids. It would appear there really is a market for a product 
like the CoCo Tuner. 

(Real-Time Specialties, Inc., 6384 Crane Road, Ypsiianti, 
MI 48197, $89) 

— Tom Carl 

Color BASte Organ is a musical organ that runs 




away at the keyboard. To start over, press SHIFT arid 



aguish 

The listing: 






INPUTM:CLS^:PORX^TdlSTEPl3:N$= 
INKEY$ : IFN$="\ ,l THENj3ELSEIFN$= , " , T 
HENNEXTELSEN^INT ( ASC (N$ ) *M) : IFN> 

More Andreessen 

(For this winning one-liner contest entry/ the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book Of Simutmiow w\& its companion Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) ■ 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 203 



Software Review! 



7ifc\ 



Zookey Is A Fun 
And Helpful Typing Tutor 

Whether one is an experienced typist or pecks across 
the keyboard with two fingers, Zookey, from Mark Data 
Products, is an interesting, fun, innovative way to practice 
typing. 

In Zookey, Mark Data demonstrates how learning can 
be fun by teaching typing in the format of a game. Rather 
than typing about nine million "fff-gggs" to practice, 
Zookey shows you a high resolution screen of animals, 
cages, keepers and keyboard symbols. 

The object of Zookey is to type the letter, number or 
symbol shown at the bottom of the screen in eight columns 
before the escaping animal gets to the trap door on the 
screen. If the typist is successful, the keeper scoots up the 
screen and closes the trap door and the typing score 
increases. If you are too late, the animal escapes and you 
lose a key. When all the keys are gone, the game ends. 

Zookey provides up to eight skill levels and up to eight 
speed levels, with your choice of letters, numbers, symbols 
(punctuation) or a mixture of all characters. The lowest 
speed and skill levels would be suitable for a beginner and, 
as an experienced typist, I had a tough time keeping up 
with the fastest levels. 

The high resolution graphics in Zookey are colorful, 
interesting and entertaining. The characters displayed for 



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typing are large and clearly formed, with the exception 
of some punctuation such as the semi-colon and arrow 
keys, which can be slightly difficult to decipher immediately. 
Once you are used to their appearance, however, you can 
zip right along. One disappointment is that the animals 
which escape are the same in every instance, rather than 
being varied. They have the appearance of plump little 
rabbits with pink checks, and as they try to escape, a 
marching sound is heard over the monitor speaker. 

Zookey is much better suited as a tutor than as a teacher 
for the typist just starting out. If you have some touch- 
typing experience, the instructions will be very clear and 
the keyboard finger chart will serve as a helpful reminder. 
If you are just starting out, there are many bad habits 
and details of touch-typing that are not listed in the 
documentation, and I would recommend consulting a 
touch-typing manual. 

Because Zookey is in a game format, it is important 
to limit playing/practice time; the documentation 
recommends 15 minutes a day, a figure which can help 
alleviate frustration and boredom. Also, the user should 
remember that he is competing with himself; "cheating" 
with finger positions in an effort to achieve a higher score 
is something to watch out for! 

Zookey is enjoyable, easy and fun to use, and most 
importantly, a very helpful typing tutor. I found that my 
own typing began to improve very quickly with it. I 
recommend this program to anyone wishing to improve 
his or her typing skills. 

(Mark Data Products, 24001 Alicia Parkway, #207, Mission 
Viejo, CA 92691, requires 32K, tape $24.95, disk $27.95) 

— Jeffrey S. Parker 




Contributions to THE RAINBOW are welcome from 



Ve like to run a variety of programs which will 

' ' >;6wnere;;^ 

disk and it 



is biejst fa^n^^ 

format. We're sorry, but we do not have time to key in 
programs. All programs should be supported by some 
editorial commentary explaining how the program works. 
Generally, we're much more interested in how your 
submission works and runs than how you developed it. 




For the benefit of those who wish more detailed infor- 
mation on 



Submissions Editor, THE RAINBOW, P.O. Box 385, 
KY 40059, Wc will send you some more 




do not submit programs or articles current] 
submitted to another publication. 



204 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



Centipede ABC's and 123'$ 

Provide Unpressured Learning 

For Children 



At what age can a child be introduced to a computer? 
When is a good time for a child to start on the road to 
computer literacy? Triad Pictures Corp. feels that a 2-year- 
old is capable of using a computer and they have produced 
two programs for very young children. Centipede ABC's 
is a program for children aged 2 to 10 which deals with 
the alphabet, and Centipede 123 "s is written for children 
aged 2 to 6 and uses the numbers one through 20. Both 
programs require 16K Extended BASIC. 

These programs work primarily in the same way except 
for their main focus. After CLDRDing either program, you 
will be asked to type in the child's name. After this, a 
skill level will have to be chosen. Each program has three 
skill levels. Level 1 is a letter or number match; it is really 
the only level that is appropriate for very young children. 
Level 2 is for children who are somewhat familiar with 
letters and letter sequences or number and number 
sequences. To use Level 3, the child should be very familiar 
with the alphabet and alphabetizing and counting. 

If Level 1 is chosen, the child will see a large letter 'A 1 
(or number l) displayed in the middle of the screen. The 
child has to match the large letter to the corresponding 
key on the computer keyboard. A correct answer will be 
rewarded with an animated piece of a centipede being added 
to a smiling centipede face. The object is to build a long, 
cute bug. An incorrect answer will cause the correct answer 
to be displayed and the child will be given another chance 
to answer. 

This type of matching exercise is very commonly used 
as a learning tool for young children. The main flaw here 
is that the shape of the Hi-Res letters or numbers on the 
screen is different from those on the keyboard. For children 
who may not yet recognize their letters and numbers, there 
is no exact match. My early childhood education experience 
indicates that for young children doing these matching 
drills, shapes have to be the same; close doesn't count. 

During Level 2 play, the child has to enter the alphabet 
or numbers in sequence beginning with 'A' or T. No hints 
are given. Level 3 asks the child to insert the missing letter 
or number between two others. For example, the computer 
will display *A' and 'C with a box between them. The 
child should type 'B' as the correct answer. In both of 
these games, a correct answer is rewarded as in Level l. 
However, after an incorrect response, the computer will 
advance to a new question. 

Both Centipede A EC's and Centipede 123 s are very low- 
key kinds of games. They provide an unpressured learning 
experience for some children and useful review for others, 
depending on each child's individual level. There is no time 
limit in fhe games, so each child can work at his/her own 
pace. 

The routines for correct and incorrect responses are quiet 
and unobtrusive, but the child can easily distinquish 



between the two. In no way is he/she ever made to feel 
badly about an incorrect response. Once the child becomes 
familiar with using a computer, the programs are easy to 
use and require little adult supervision. 

I became fascinated with the claim that both programs 
could be used by a 2-year-old, so I invited Heather, a 
neighbor, to my house. She liked the pictures and pressing 
the computer keys. However, she had a five minute 
attention span. Even if she had the knowledge necessary 
for Level 1 games, they were both much too long. It is 
too bad, especially in Centipede 123's, that the user is not 
given a choice of parameters. There are more young children 
who can count to five than can count to 20. The length 
of the game could be better controlled and the child could 
get the feeling of finishing something and reaping the 
rewards. 

Along with Heather came Sean, aged 4. The programs 
were ideal for him and he really enjoyed using them. I 
went on to observe other children and found these programs 
are ideal for preschoolers through second graders. 

There are, of course, children at both ends of the spectrum 
that will benefit and enjoy both Centipede programs. 
Individual differences and your child's own ability should 
always be taken into consideration. Like the centipede in 
these programs, a child's knowledge will keep on growing. 

(Triad Pictures Corp., P.O. Box 1299, 134 Simders Rd., 
Sequim, WA 98382, both tapes for $25) 

— Stephanie Snyder 



ADOS 



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Now, you can supercharge Basic with an impressive array of extra features 
WITHOUT sacrificing compatibility! ADOS is compatible with virtually 100% of 
commercial software. Customizing utilities are provided to allow user-defined 
command abbreviations, baud rate, step rate, tracks per disk (35 or 40), support of 
double-sided drives, and more. After customizing ADOS, you can have it burned into 
an EPROM that plugs into the Disk Basic ROM socket, or just use it in RAM as a 64K 
disk utility. (EPROM t burning will cost about $20--we provide information 
concerning how you can have this done.) Features include: • repeat and edit of the 
last direct mode command * 26 definable control-key abbreviations • automatic line- 
number prompts • DOS command • lowercase command entry (a fine complement to 
a Lowerkit or PBJ WordPak) • COPY (filename) to (drive number) • AE error override 
option • RAM command (64K) • RUNM command • text echoing to printer • ML 
monitor • text file scan • enhanced directory • error trapping • hi-res text utility 
included (42, 51, or 64 characters per line) 

7 COULD NOT FIND ANY SOFTWARE THAT WOULD NOT RUN UNDER ADOS." 

THE RAINBOW, December 1984 
7 LOVE ADOS! . . . A GENUINELY FIRST RATE PRODUCT." 

Color Micro Journal, February 1985 
"I WONT PART WITH MY ADOS EPROM FOR ANYTHING . . . NO COMPATIBILITY 
PROBLEMS." 

Hot CoCo.May 1985 



Disk.. $27.95 



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Execution speed can be varied from full speed to the barest crawl, or halted entirely, 
as programs run. Single-stepping, breakpoints, memory or register examine/change. 
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speed mode is changed. Control-key functions for many Basic commands and for 
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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 205 



Software Review! 



T/7S 



Dan Tucker's Mine Is A Gold 
Mine Of An Adventure 



This text Adventure from Pal Creations is billed as an 
expert level encounter, and it is! Dan Tucker's Mine offers 
a challenge to anyone who considers himself to be a master 
at this kind of challenge. There are cabins with locked 
doors, old sheds, bridges, rivers and more in this program 
— enough to test the wits of any Adventure buff. 

The program is supplied on a high quality cassette and 
a short, but adequate, instruction sheet is included. The 
Adventure begins when Dan Tucker's will is read and you 
find that he has left you his property. Unfortunately, he 
has left no information on how to find the fortune in gold 
rumored to be hidden there, so begins a great Adventure. 

The program begins with a colorful title screen followed 
by instructions and a list of available verbs. You have the 
option of playing with the objects in the same location 
for every game or you may select randomized placement 
of the objects for a different challenge. As with most of 
the more complex Adventures, you must have the right 
equipment at the right time. This can lead to some retracing 
of steps to achieve the right combination, but it's all part 
of the game. 



The game is written in Extended Color BASIC for 32K 
machines and, as supplied, it will not run with the disk 
controller installed. Listing the first 30 lines revealed the 
reason for this. The Pal Creations logo on the title page 
takes enough memory to prevent the use of the disk 
controller. I was able to delete the logo, save the remaining 
program to disk and run from disk with no problems. (The 
logo is a neat piece of work and produces a different color 
pattern each time, but I don't like to remove my disk 
controller and can't yet afford a multi-pack interface.) 

My only other complaint with this Adventure is not being 
able to save a game in progress. As difficult as this one 
is, I really would appreciate the ability to save my progress. 
I suppose for the price this fault can be excused, as the 
Adventure itself is what it's all about and this one is cleverly 
done and runs quickly and smoothly on the screen. 

There is a lot of entertainment value packed into Dan 
Tucker's Mine. My 15-year-old son said: "If I was sentenced 
to life imprisonment and could take only one game, this 
would be it!" 

(Pal Creations, 10456 Amantha Ave., San Diego, CA 92126, 
32K ECB, cassette $14.95) 

— Charles Bream 

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206 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



T/Z\ 



Destroy The Enemy And Don't 
Get Caught in Metabot 

Metabot, written by Jay R. Hoggins, is a new strategy 
game from HARMONYCS Software. The object of the 
game is to destroy the enemy Metabots by luring them 
into the electric fences or acid pots randomly placed on 
the screen by the computer. If you are able to accomplish 
this, a new screen is drawn and two more Metabots are 
added to the number needed to advance to the next screen. 

Upon CLDRDMing and EXECuting the program, the player 
is greeted with a title page and a four-part harmony 
rendition of "Darth Vader's Theme" from Star Wars. The 
computer then asks if you need instructions; if you reply 
"yes," the title screen disappears and a new screen is drawn 
with a little poem which gives the general object of the 
game. Pressing any key will cause the program to ask the 
player to type in his name of up to nine letters. The program 
next asks the player which of the three levels he wishes 
to attempt. Once all this preliminary information is entered, 
the game begins. 

The computer draws the game board, printing your name 
in the lower left corner, and a diagram of the keyboard 
layout you are to use to move your player around the 
grid is displayed in the lower right corner. Your player 
can move in eight directions, controlled by pressing the 
'U,' T,' 'O,' 'J,' 'M,' comma and period keys. The game 
board consists of the electric fences, the acid pots, your 
player and the Metabots. 

To destroy the Metabots, the player must move around 
the board trying to make the enemies run into the fences 
or pots without the player running info the obstacles. 

If you move your player within three seconds of the 
start of the game, you will receive the optimum amount 
of points for each robot destroyed for that level. Otherwise, 
the value for the destroyed robots is decreased 10 points 
for moves taking between three and 10 seconds, and then 
20 points for moves taking beyond 10 seconds. Every time 
your player moves one space, all the enemy robots move 
one space, continually stalking your player. 

Destroying all the Metabots takes you to the next screen, 
but if one should touch your player or should you run 
into a pot or fence, the game is over and your position 
on the high score list is displayed. 

There is an old proverb that states,"You can't judge a 
book by its cover." If I had just read the instructions to 
this game and had not seen the program itself, 1 would 
have envisioned the game to have a little man running 
around the screen, dodging these big robots and watching 
out for the electric fences. But, what you get is a flashing 
dot, similar in shape to a cursor, representing your player. 
The deadly Metabots are multicolored blocks the same 
size as your player. The pots and fences are solid blocks, 
again the same size as your player. 

On Page 153 of the December 1984 issue of THE 
rainbow, one can get a fairly accurate picture of the 
program in the advertisement for the game. One might 
argue that a strategy game (what this program claims to 
be) docs not require great graphics, just something to aid 
the player in determining his next moves. I don't agree 
with this because if I'm to pay up to $21 for a game, I 



expect graphics the CoCo is capable of, not something 
that looks like it came off the TRS-80 Model 4. To say 
the least, I was disappointed with the graphics in Metabot. 

Even with sub-par graphics, a game can be good if it 
is fun to play. Again, I believe Metabot falls short in this 
area. The basic problem with this game is that it is too 
easy. The Metabots have virtually no intelligence; they just 
move until they are lined up with your player and then 
just follow your every move no matter where it takes them. 

The three levels of play don't significantly alter the 
difficulty of the game. When you do clear the screen of 
all the Metabots, your reward is nothing but a little message 
written on the top of the screen. 

The sound effects aren't as exciting as the documentation 
claims, just "beeps," although the music at the start of 
the game sounds pretty good. The documentation supplied 
with the program is very comprehensive for a game, but 
I did find some typos within its six small pages, maybe 
signifying that the program was rushed out on the market 
too quickly. 

If you don't mind paying up to $21 for an easy strategy 
game, then this game is for you, but frankly, I don't think 
the program is worth the price. Metabot may have a 
problem finding a specific age audience because the younger 
set will become uninterested with the lack of good graphics, 
sound and incentive to continue on destroying Metabots, 
while older players, who might be able to forgive the game 
for these points, will find the game too simple. 

(HARMONYCS, 1747 Patricia Lane, Salt Lake City, Utah 
84116, cassette $18.95, disk $20.95) 

— Ken Coleman 



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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 207 



Software Reviewm 



Recess Games Encourages 
Logical Thought Processes 

Recess, in my day, meant running out to the schoolyard 
and playing with the equipment there. When it rained, we 
usually went to the school gym. Times have changed, if 
B-5 Software's title, Recess Games, is taken literally. What 
we have here is a group of four computerized games which 
provide a break from more formal learning, but all of which 
improve a child's use of logic, not a group of games for 
outdoor use. 

The disk version loads a title screen and a menu from 
which the individual games are selected, while in the tape 
version each game is loaded individually. From the 
instructions, I infer that is the only difference between the 
two. 

In Treasure Hunt, the object is to find a treasure chest 
concealed beneath one of the squares on a 10 by 10 grid. 
Horizontally the grid is labeled with red letters, vertically 
with green letters. Squares are chosen by specifying the 
coordinate letters. To the right of the grid is a thermometer 
which indicates how close your selection is to the goal; 
the higher the temperature, the closer you are. 

As squares are selected they become chess pawns, until 
the square with the chest is found. Then a small chest 
is seen in that square; the screen clears and a large treasure 
chest fills the screen. 




Brings operating 
temperature 
to ambient, 
regardless 

of 

accessory 

load 

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ENTIRE computer, 
just the SAM chip 

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• $39.95 

Companion Keyboard Cover $7.95 
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REM Industries, Inc. 

9420 "B'LurlineAve., Chatsworth, CA 9131 1 

(818) 341-3719 



This game provides an excellent introduction to the use 
of coordinates, but has one puzzling peculiarity. When the 
game initializes, most of the squares are blue, but some, 
apparently at random, have pictures on them. Everyone 
(cliild and adult) who tried this game immediately wanted 
to know what the pictures were for, but no one could think 
of a reason for their presence. 

Master Brain is a computerized version of "Mastermind," 
in which numbers are to be guessed. The player selects 
the size of the number to be guessed, from two to four 
digits, and the range of digits to be used, with a maximum 
of 10, using zero through nine. The number chosen as the 
guess is on the left, and on the right are two columns, 
labeled right and wrong. If a zero is placed in the right 
column, one number guessed is in the puzzle and in the 
right place. If an 'X' is in the wrong column, one number 
is in the puzzle but in the wrong place. If nothing appears 
in either column, all numbers used in the guess are incorrect. 

The screen display is good and clear. However, it allows 
for the display of only 12 guesses and no provision is made 
for scrolling earlier choices off the screen, so the player 
has only 12 chances for each puzzle. The instructions advise 
beginners to start with a few digits and then go to the 
more advanced levels. Although this is good advice, a very 
common comment heard during testing was "I almost had 
it figured out." For children learning to play such logic 
games, it is better to allow them as many chances as they 
need for success rather than to establish arbitrary limits 
which lead to frustration. 

Number Guess is a good version of the old favorite, 
which allows the player to select the range of numbers 
in which the number is found, and the screen shows if 
the guess is too high or too low. Unlike Master Brain, 
there is scrolling so the child can see the last eight guesses 
made and continue until successful. 

The fourth game is a nice version of Tic-Tac-Toe for 
one or two players, which uses the arrow keys to move 
the X's and O's. 

On the whole, these are colorful, well-presented games 
that are fun to play and at the same time encourage logical 
thought processes. The accompanying booklet gives clear 
instructions for game play and includes some suggested 
learning activities. 

(B-5 Software Co., 1024 Bainbridge Place, Columbus, OH 
43228, tape requires 16K ECB, $19.95; disk requires 32K 
ECB, $21.95.) 

— Carol Kueppers 



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208 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



Test Your Command 
Strategies With Debacle 



Debacle is a historical Simulation of the 1755 battle 
involving a French garrison and their Indian allies at Fort 
Duquesne against a vastly superior British force. The 
Simulation's name is derived from the overwhelming defeat 
the British suffered even though they outnumbered their 
adversaries nearly four to one. 

The game requires 32K of Extended Color BASIC and 
has two copies on tape but can easily be transferred to 
disk. The eight-page instruction manual is very attractive 
and professionally printed on heavy parchment-type paper 
analogous with the game's time frame. Furthermore, the 
first two pages of the manual are a detailed reflection on 
the historical nature of the battle. These two factors 
effectively establish the game's mood once the Simulation 
is CLORDed (which takes a little over two minutes) and 
run. 

Upon running, there are various user responses required. 
These include whether the high-speed POKE is usable on 
your particular computer, whether it is a new or continued 
game (the program reads and saves the game to disk if 
a disk drive is attached; otherwise, it is saved to tape) and 
what skill level is desired (level 1 is a practice session for 
game familiarization, up to level 5, which is an accurate 
representation of the actual battle). 

The title page graphics are relatively simple and it plays 
several short classical tunes which are apropos to Debacle's 
setting. This musical interlude is rather lengthy, but 
apparently permits CoCo to draw the playing field map. 
However, do not let this simplistic graphics title page 
deceive you; this is a very sophisticated Simulation which 
belies its introductory sequence. 

The playing field map consists of forest areas, mountains 
and streams which you, as commander, must navigate from 
the lower right of the monitor screen to the upper left 
where Fort Duquesne is located. Other factors hampering 
your march are a time factor, Indian attacks, and supplying 
your combat units. 

You commence your march on May 29 with four combat 
units and one supply unit under the command of Dunbar. 
Their initial task is to clear the forested areas so when 
the major force of Halket, Ranger, Artillery and Supply 
arrive on June 9, they will have an easier time of marching 
to the main destination of Fort Duquesne. Since there are 
numerous Indian attacks enroute, it behooves you to lessen 
their numbers by searching and capturing their camps in 
the woods. The more Indian camps captured, the fewer 
Indians a there are to assist the French in defending the fort. 
Capturing the Indians is best accomplished by the Rangers 
since they have the best maneuverability. 

A recurring situation you must cope with is keeping the 



combat units adequately supplied because they become 
immobile once their supplies are exhausted. However, the 
supply units are the least maneuverable of all the units; 
therefore, a carefully orchestrated method of supply is 
necessitated, especially since your battle plan must be 
completed no later than July 17. 

Selecting which unit to move is performed by a polling 
cursor routine which shows the unit's identity, their current 
strength, the number of days of supplies on hand, and 
the number of moves available. It is essential that you 
know which unit you wish to move because once you key 
in the movement code, it is too late to change your mind; 
that unit must be moved. 

Even though this war Simulation is relatively short in 
its playing time (two to three hours), it requires intense 
concentration and an effective method of attack to succeed 
at winning. Part of the enjoyment in a game like this is 
discovering the various scenarios that may be utilized to 
ascertain the most effective strategy, so I will avoid giving 
any specific tips, however, a few general words of advice 
are to make sure all combat units are well supplied before 
reaching the fort, try to capture as many Indian camps 
as possible and determine an efficient means of crossing 
the mountains. 

Once Debacle is completed, the computer critiques your 
battle plan and lists statistics concerning the battle. After 
you have digested this data and are ready to play again, 
you must press Reset to exit the statistic screen. 

A few problems I incurred primarily concerned trying 
to save or load games in progress. Upon loading a saved 
game from tape, I received an I/O Error in Line 363. On 
another occasion, I received an FD Error (bad file data) 
in Line 364. According to the author, there are three saves 
made on tape but I could not get any of them to load. 

When trying to save a game on disk, I received an SN 
Error in Line 508. According to the author, this was a 
common problem when he and associates play-tested the 
game. This problem varies from computer to computer 
and is caused by either having or not having a space between 
the WRITE and # codes in lines 508, 510, 512, 514, 516 
and 518. After careful consideration, the author decided 
to omit the spaces in these lines. Once I made these changes, 
I was pleased to find that disk saves/ loads were easily 
accomplished. 

A final problem I encountered concerned the polling 
cursor routine. On two separate occasions, once at level 
1 and once at level 5, the routine unexpectedly hung up, 
preventing any input whatsoever. This was particularly 
frustrating after playing a game for nearly two hours. 
Numerous conversations between the author and me failed 
to resolve the problem and it finally appeared to be a 
genuine bug in the program. The author is currently 
attempting to resolve the bug and may have it done by 
the time this review is published. I was genuinely impressed 
with the author's concern in attempting to make the game 
100 percent operational and his historical knowledge. 

If you enjoy war Simulations, you will find Debacle 
testing your best command strategies. 

(Picosoft Games, P.O. Box 35, Eighty Four, PA 15330, 
tape $24.95, Pennsylvania residents add 6% tax) 

— Dan Smith 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 209 



Hardware Review! 



7/?s\ Software Review* 



Clip Surge Spikes 
With Electra-Guard 

Several weeks ago I received Electra-Guard, the SS-1 
Surge Suppressor, for review. My first reaction was panic. 
How was I going to check out the surge suppressor? There 
was no way I was going to induce voltage or current surges 
into my equipment. I decided on an alternative to actual 
surge testing, running Electra-Guard under various loads. 

Electra-Guard was tested on a large variety of equipment, 
everything from video recorders to complete computer 
setups. Normally, I had a six-outlet power strip plugged 
into the surge suppressor. All the equipment operated 
properly. 

The specification data included with Electra-Guard was 
a little skimpy for a review. I called Howard Medical, the 
manufacturer, for more information. 1 placed the call at 
8 p.m. (Chicago time), and there was someone on duty 
to answer my questions. I talked to Ross Litton, and he 
gave me the information I needed. Electra-Guard can 
handle 15 amps of current and works on 115 VAC house 
power. The response time of the surge suppressor is five 
billionths of a second. Surge spikes of 6000 volts will be 
clipped to 240 volts. 

There is a red wihdowcator on Electra-Guard. If the 
windowcator turns black, return Electra-Guard to Howard 
Medical. The black color indicates the surge suppressor 
has been hit by a very large surge. I was told that Electra- 
Guard has a five year warranty. 

From my research, I discovered that you can put a six- 
outlet power strip, with power indicator, on/ off switch and 
circuit breaker together with Electra-Guard for about $35. 
I found one thing missing that I like to see on electrical 
devices: a UL number. According to the package I received, 
Electra-Guard was not tested by Underwriters Laboratory. 
I think products of this type should be tested by an 
independent laboratory. 

(Howard Medical, P.O. Box 2, Chicago, IL 60690, all CoCo 
equipment, $16.25 plus $2.00 S/H) 



YACHT SEE Can Make 
Dice-Rolling Addictive 

In our rush to find uses for our computer, we sometimes 
overdo it. If I write only five checks a month, a check 
balancing program is probably unnecessary. If my taxes 
only require the short form, I'm probably wasting money 
and time if I purchase income tax software. Twenty 
phonograph records or 10 recipes do not usually justify 
a database program. 

The same goes for games. A game that is simple, fast 
and enjoyable is not necessarily improved by playing it 
on the computer. Such is the case with YACHTSEE by 
Beargrip Software. 

The original non-computer game which this game is 
based on is played with five dice and a scoresheet. Players 
take turns rolling and rerolling the dice trying to make 
certain combinations. Points are scored and the game ends 
when the various categories are filled. Despite the 
randomness of the dice roll, there is some skill involved 
in winning. The game is fast and fun, and sometimes even 
addictive. 

YACHTSEE uses the Color Computer to roll the dice 
and keep score for up to six players. The game's graphics 
are good and the scorekeeping is correct and helpful, but 
the game simply moves too slowly. The slowdown occurs 
while waiting for the game to ask if you wish to roll again 
and then which dice you will reroll. The program is written 
in BASIC and the slowness clearly affects the game's 
playability. 

THE rainbow's guidelines for reviewers asks us to let 
the product stand on its own. Even if you have never played 
the original dice game, I think you will find the game's 
pace is just not fast enough. If you have played the original, 
you'll probably want to stick with it — some things are 
just not improved by putting them on a computer. 

(Beargrip Software, distributed by Softmart, P.O. Box 
61095, Raleigh, NC 27661, 32K ECB, tape $16.95, disk 

$17.95) 



— Gabe Weaver 



— John Matviko 



CCAD-B SYSTEM 
Tfce CCAD-B system is* 
#13 Bit Analog/Digital Converted * 
16 Input Channels for Analog Sensor 
signals * 3 TTL Compatable Latched 
Outputs for OUT of RANGE Indicators 
* Operates with CoCo 1 or 2. Disk 
or Tape * On-Board User Amplifiers 
for Scaling of Sensor Inputs * 
Operating Addresses Switch 
Selectable for Multiple Units * 
On-Board HISH PRECISION Reference 
for Stability and Accuracy * 
Optional MENU DRIVEN BASIC/MACHINE 
CODE Operating System for CCAD-B 
ORDER: CCAD-BH $169. «0 
CCSOFT-DISK $29.50 
CCSQFT-TAPE $87.50 



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* 8 Bit Analog/Digital Converter * 
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signals * Operates with CoCo 1 or 
2 f Disk or Tape interface 
contained in Plastic Case for 
Convenience * Sensor Interface via 
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THincr 



210 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Hardware Review! 



ME-128-64 128K Upgrade 
Expands CoCo's Memory 

Many of us old timers can remember when we only had 
4K. Then came 16, 32 and now 64K. I used to think this 
was the limit to my CoCo's memory. Recently, my ideas 
of the CoCo's ability have been expanded by the 
introduction of the ME-128-64 128K Upgrade from 
Dynamic Electronics. 

This upgrade comes with all the parts needed. The only 
tools needed are a screwdriver to open up your CoCo's 
case. I also used an IC extracter/ inserter to help me, but 
a small flat blade screwdriver should also work. The 
upgrade consists of 10 ICs, installation instructions, a small 
user's guide and a copy of Dynamic's catalog. 

The installation was fairly simple because all the soldering 
has already been done for you by Dynamic. To do the 
upgrade, you first open the cover of your CoCo. A word 
of advice at this point: as you loosen each screw, place 
a piece of tape over the screw hole. This way, when you 
turn the CoCo right side up, you don't have to worry about 
where the little parts have gone in your shag rug. 

After the cover is off, you must remove your RF shield. 
Then, you remove your eight 4164 memory chips from 
their sockets and put them aside. The same is done with 
the 6883 SAM chip and the 6822 or 6823 PIA chip #U18, 
for 'F' boards, or U8 for *D' or ( E' boards. (My 
documentation did not say what chip it was in the CoCo 
2. I also suspect those of you who have the new CoCo 
2 with the new SAM chip and only two memory chips 
will not be able to use this upgrade.) 

After the old chips are out, put the new chip/ socket 
combos back in their place. At this time, you can check 
to see if these new chips are working. After this, put your 
original chips back in the sockets on top of the hew chips. 
It will remind you of the old "piggyback" upgrades as each 
memory socket, the SAM chip and one of your PI As now 
has two chips plugged with one on top of the other. 

A small hole should be drilled in your CoCo's case to 
hold the small toggle switch that switches between your 
two banks of memory. Replace the cover on the CoCo, 
tighten the cover screws (wasn't the tape a great idea?) 
and you are done. 

Use of your two banks of 64K can be controlled by 
hardware or by software. Two simple pokes switch you 
between banks or you can use the switch to do it manually. 
In effect, you now have two 64K computers in one. 

You can use either bank you wish but there is a catch. 
Because you have only one CPU and VDG, you must be 
doing similar things in both banks or these chips will get 
confused. You can run two BASIC programs if, when you 
switch banks, you are in the text mode. 

You can also run any two copies of a heavy graphics 
program. For example, I edited two documents with my 
word processor at the same time. I switched the switch 
and the document on the screen changed. I also was able 
to run two copies of an arcade game. By doing this, two 
sets of high scores can be kept going at the same time. 

One fault I found was the claim that you could pass 
variables between banks. The instructions contained no 
indication of how this could be done. A call to Dynamic 
(they were open on a Saturday!) cleared it up. You can 



pass a zero through 128 integer value between banks from 
BASIC. To do this, you take the value you want to pass, 
multiply it by two and POKE -it in memory address 65321. 
The receiving bank PEEKs that address and divides it by 
two. The multiplying and dividing is needed because you 
are actually storing a value in a PIA register which masks 
out bit zero when it does the switch. I was told this 
information would be included in future editions of their 
instructions. 

One other problem I had was with overheating the SAM 
chip. With two SAMs stacked on top of each other, heat 
can build up after three or four hours. The overheating 
of the SAM chip will make your computer lose track of 
where memory is and what's in it. I found pieces of my 
text wandering around my review as I typed it in. One 
of the small fans you can buy should cure this. Possibly 
a heat sink could be built into the kit by Dynamic, also. 

Overall, I found this to be an easy-to-install upgrade 
that performed exactly as is advertised. What I would like 
to see now is more software that could take advantage 
of the extra 64K. How about a 64K RAM disk? Dynamic 
has shown us what could be the next step in the continuing 
evolution of the CoCo. 

Dr. Megabyte salutes the pioneers who blaze a new trail 
of CoCo power for the rest of us. For those of you who 
want to follow right behind these pioneers, I recommend 
the ME-128-64 128K Upgrade from Dynamic Electronics. 

(Dynamic Electronics Inc., P.O. Box 896, Hartselle, AL 
35640, $129.) 

— Mark E. Sunderlin 



PICOSOFT STRATEGY GAMES 

& THE SPANISH ARMADA 

Simulates the problems faced by the 
English Commanders in 1 588 as they 
struggled to defeat the ARMADA. 
Cope with fickle winds. A relentless 
current. Difficulty of supply. $24.95 








DEBACLE 

Command "an 18th century army in the ?> 
opening campaign of the French and 
Indian War. Build a road through the "^ 
wilderness. Establish supply lines. CopeC^ 
with Indian attacks. Capture a frontier ^\!*ji 
fort. ^ $24.95 



FEUER AND GASSE 

Lead the American 2nd Division in a 
counter offensive against von Luden- 
dorffs final drive on Paris in 1918. 
Recreates the battles of Belieau Wood 
and Chateau Thierry. Plays in real 
time. $24.95 



All games require a 32K computer and are graphically portrayed 
using the semi-graphics 4 mode to depict the battle maps, tape 
and disk compatible. Games are shipped on tape. 

Send check or money order to PICOSOFT GAMES, P.O. BOX 
35, EIGHTY FOUR, PA 15330; (412) 267-3721. Games are 
shipped postage paid. PA residents add 6% Tax. No delays for 
personal checks. 

Distributed in Canada by Kelly Software Distributors Ltd., P.O. Box i 1 932, 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 3L1; (403) 421-8003. 




June 1985 THE RAINBOW 



211 



Software Reviews 



The Shadow Lurks 
In Action-Packed Shamus 

He's here all right. You could tell from the moment you 
entered. This is just the type of place the "Shadow" loves 
— dark, dreary, dangerous and deadly. Deadly, at least, 
for you. The Shadow's Lair has the most modern intruder- 
exterminating system in the known galaxy. Robo-Droids 
patrol the corridors, programmed to destroy you at any 
cost. Whirling Drones home in on your every move and 
Snap-Jumpers snap in and out of your time-space 
continuum appearing first in front, then in back of you, 
or worse, on you. 

And, as if his creatures were not enough to dispose of 
you, the Shadow has electrified the walls. Of course, your 
every move is monitored by the big man himself, who at 
any moment might appear on the scene, covered in his 
impregnable Tri-Gamma armor. 

But you are the "Shamus," and the word "quit" is most 
decidedly absent from your vocabulary. Armed with your 
Ion-Shivs, which you can fire in any one of eight directions, 
you have vowed to kill this shady Shadow character if 
it's the last thing you do! But it won't be easy , . . you 
knew that from the start. 

The Shadow has built a four-level, 148-room complex. 
You must traverse the treacherous maze-like passageways 
in search of the keys which will allow you to advance to 
the deeper levels of this dungeon, for it is only in the deepest 



Canadians 

Can you imagine it? 
It's free 




Send for your free copy of our catalog/newsletter. 

It will contain articles, rumors and letters of interest to 

all Canadians. We stock all of the latest products available for 

the color computer, and the best news is that it will usually 

cost you less than importing from the United States. Kelly 

Software is Canada's largest distributor of CoCo Software, 

Dealer inquiries invited. 

Kelly Software Distributors Ltd, 

P.O. Box 11932 

Edmonton, Alberta 

T5J-3L1 Telephone (403) 421-8003. 



recesses of Level 3 that you have a chance to annihilate 
your nemesis. 

Thus begins the game of Shamus, one of Radio Shack's 
latest disk-based game programs. Shamus itself is not a 
new game. It was released about a year ago by Synapse 
Software, which has since ceased marketing CoCo software. 
The game is fun, action-packed and is well thought out, 
but the real question in any game review is not "Is the 
game good?", rather, "With all the other games available 
for the CoCo, is this game worth spending money on?" 
Read on for the answer. 

To load Shamus, insert one of the two copy-protected 
disks which Tandy supplies into the drive and type 
RUN''SHflMUS~. After a few seconds, a title screen will 
appear, accompanied by some very good music. The game 
will then give you the option of changing the skill level 
from Novice to either Advanced or Expert. One of the 
novel features here is that changing the skill level affects 
only one thing in the game — the speed. In fact, at the 
Expert level, I'd say it is one of the fastest CoCo games 
you could buy. 

Shamus is a "shoot-'em-up" game. It doesn't pretend 
to be much else. Rather, it makes the most of what it 
is. The graphics are good, animation smooth and sound 
effects adequate. Joystick response is good, even from the 
old Radio Shack ones. 

And addicting it is. One of the elements which makes 
the game even more addictive is that unlike many shoot- 
'em-ups, Shamus never really ends until you defeat the 
Shadow, a task which is not easily accomplished (I have 
yet to reach Level 3!). The game doesn't just end; instead, 
your quest continues and your desire to crush the Shadow 
intensifies. 

All of which brings us to the real point in this review 
— is Shamus worth $30? If you abhor shoot-'em-ups, or 
would prefer strategy games, perhaps not. But if a fun- 
filled game which is 98 percent pure action is what you 
yearn for, I'd be hard pressed to recommend a better game. 

(Radio Shack Stores nationwide, 16K, disk $29.95, Catalog 
No. 26-3289) 

— Eric Tilenius 



■0tt^£mer Contest Winner . 



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212 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



Software Review! 



PANZERS EAST! Gives 

Many Hours Of 
War Game Competition 

The date: June 22, 1942. The time: 3 a.m. You have 
been given sole responsibility for Operation Barbarossa, 
the Nazi plan for the invasion and destruction of the Soviet 
empire. At your disposal are over 400 divisions as well 
as the might of the Luftwaffe. Your opponents are a 
defending army about 25 percent larger than your own, 
the vast distances of the Soviet steppes, and time — time 
for the Soviets to dig in, time for their rearmament and 
recovery from your surprise attack, and time that will bring 
the bitter Russian winter; the same winter that crushed 
Napoleon and would force a halt of your offensive for 
months, depriving you of the momentum of the attack 
and allowing the Soviets to rebuild for a counterattack. 
It's time now to order PANZERS EAST!. 

Game components are limited to the cassette (which has 
a Commodore 64 version on side one and Radio Shack 
versions 1/ III/4 followed by the CoCo version on side two), 
a clearly written 12-page instruction booklet and a small, 
attractive map of the Western Soviet Union. The map is 
necessary as (unfortunately) no graphics are used in the 
program. 

As with another Avalon Hill game for the CoCo 
(MIDWAY) the CoCo version of PANZERS EAST! has 



extra options not included in the versions for the other 
systems. These allow the player to check the geographic 
regions of greatest importance to final victory, or order 
up a standard Combat Air Patrol for selected areas. Both 
make for easier and faster play. 

My trusty 6 E' board is willing to ignore cassette programs 
for the models I/III/4, so it was possible to avoid fiddling 
with earphone and microphone jacks when loading by 1) 
going fast forward to the end of side one, 2) flipping the 
tape, 3) typing PDKE25,G, and 4) CLDRD. Now go and 
prepare a hearty snack: two sandwiches and a glass of 
milk should do. Don't rush. When all is "OK" type RUN. 

The playing time is given as one to three hours. Except 
for my first two games (in which the CoCo beat me solidly 
in under 90 minutes each time), I found playing times to 
run from five to seven hours. Be sure you have a comfortable 
location as you are likely to be pinned down for some 
time. This may be a personal problem, though, as T find 
playing times longer than listed with most strategy games 
I've played. 

After typing RUN and the Avalon Hill logo leaves the 
screen, you are asked if this is a new game or one in progress. 
If a continuing game, you now place the cassette with the 
previously saved data file in the cassette player, press Play 
and continue. A new game requires further decisions of 
playing a historical game or a very slightly shortened version 
which gives one week of better weather and a few more 
ready units at the start. 

Next, you set the importance of general campaign 
objectives — capture of population centers, industry, 
agricultural areas, isolating the Soviet Union and 
maintenance of Allied good will. These are key decisions 



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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 



213 



as this information is used to generate a list of areas with 
moderate to high victory point values, so you must set 
your military objectives for the game. Avoiding the main 
objectives can lead to being relieved of command or more 
often the firing squad (a bit drastic I thought). 

The last choice to make (we are still in pre-game set 
up) is what percentage of the Luftwaffe to throw against 
the Soviet air force. (I suggest a full 100 percent as anything 
less risks the survival of a significant portion of Russian 
air power and to provide effective support requires at least 
one-third of the available aircraft.) A strong first strike 
leaves the Soviets with about 10 percent of German air 
strength; unless checked, this will build as the game 
progresses. 

At the start of each turn, except the first, you must decide 
which single area will receive supply priority. It is critical 
that attacking units be kept in supply, as poor supply can 
reduce effective strength by 75 percent! Many times this 
will call for a difficult choice as several areas may be in 
combat or open to counterattack, and each may be in need 
of resupply. The greater the number of areas you occupy, 
the greater the difficulty in supply and danger of 
counterattack. 

The key to playing PANZERS EAST! is keeping track 
of both Soviet and German troop strengths and locations. 
This data can be taken from the "review troops" command 
and the "intelligence" command. To provide an easily 
readable record of the situation, I found it helpful to use 
self-made counters representing either 20 or 50 units to 
be placed on the map provided with the game. These are 
updated each turn, allowing a close watch to be kept on 
a gradual Soviet buildup and also ensure you know your 



NEW SOFTWARE SPECIALS! 

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runs. Includes FULL SCREEN EDIT! Every program becomes 

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SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY PRICE. $15.00 

FSE - The FULL SCREEN EDITOR for tape or disk! Easy to 
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Issue #2 now available! Tired of seeing fabulous ad pictures 
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own strong and weak points. 

The Luftwaffe is available for Combat Air Patrol (CAP), 
Bomber Escort, Ground Attack (straffing) and Bombing 
Missions. From about turn three on, be sure to assign 
CAP to all areas in which you have troops. Also, some 
long range CAP to go with bombers and escorting fighters 
often brings in a bonus of extra downed Soviet aircraft. 
A CAP of three or four over rear areas is generally enough, 
while four to seven over your main troop concentrations 
might be called for late in the game (when they are most 
difficult to spare). 

Use the Luftwaffe as a disrupting force against Soviet 
troop buildups and in support of attacking troops. It 
appears that straffing does little damage while incurring 
relatively heavy losses. Don't be concerned about 
transferring air assets from one operational zone to another. 
Air power should largely follow the troops, 

PANZERS EAST! touches many problems from air 
power to partisans (they attack weakly-held areas) to 
weather, even Allied troops who refuse to move beyond 
their limited zones of responsibility. A game save feature 
even allows the saving of a game at a given point, so it 
may be played again from that point to fine tune strategies 
— an interesting technique to apply if you want to win 
a particular game at all costs! 

For those of you with an interest in the eastern front 
war, or any wide scale conflict involving the military aspects 
of expansion and occupation, PANZERS EAST! will give 
many evenings of competition. Avalon Hill has provided 
another welcome addition for your war game collection. 

(The Avalon Hill Game Company, 4517 Harford Road, 
Baltimore, MD 21214, 32K ECB, tape $25) 

— Nevin J. Templin 




5 ) : DRAW" BM=X ; , =Y ; R=X2 ; D=X1 ; L=X2 ; 
U-Xl ; lf : PAINT (X+l , Y+l) ,2,4: CIRCLE 



(Z , S) ,X2 : PAINT (Z , S) ,2 , 4 : LINE (X, Y 



>1 




Jo Ann Karaffa 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 

" " " " ' lion , 



214 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Reviewl 



Youngsters Can Enjoy 
Tic-Tac-Toe With CoCo 

The classic game of "Tic-Tac-Toe" is certainly one of 
the earliest board games a young child learns to play. This 
cassette-based version, for the 16K Extended basic Color 
Computer, is definitely more enjoyable than the version 
typically played on paper. 

Loading instructions are on the cassette label and the 
program loads in approximately 60 seconds with no 
problem at all. Upon running, there is a title page and 
a high speed 'X' and 'O' traveling across the screen. These 
two alpha characters generate tones that with a little 
imagination sound like their pronunciation. 

The operating instructions are complete and easy to 
understand. Game options include: A) If there are two 
players or if you are playing against the computer; B) Tf 
you want to be 'X' or 'O'; C) If you would rather use 
joysticks or the arrow keys; D) The number of games per 
match (one to five); and E) The level of play (this is for 
playing against the computer only and includes beginner, 
average, or impossible-to-beat levels). 

Since this game appears to be for a child who is a novice 
to Tic-Tac-Toe, I am surprised there are no instructions 
whatsoever on how to play the game itself. 

The graphics are very colorful and easily legible for 
young eyes while most of the sound effects are pleasurable 
enough. Even though my 16-month-old son is much too 
young to comprehend the game's concept, he enjoyed 
viewing the screen and listening to the audio. 

Playing against the computer, I found it pleasing to 
discover that it did not make moves that were obviously 



One-Liner Contest Winner . . ■ 

This program will turn your CoCo into an alarm 
system to guard against any little "door-slammer" who 
may want to bang on those keys if you have to leave 
the room Just turn up the TV volume and wait. 

The listing; 

Ij3 A$=INKEY$ : IFA$=" "THEN1J3ELS.EFO 
RX~1T05:Y===RND(8) : CLSY: SOUND15J3, 8 

EYS AGAIN 1 !" tF6^^3^:i^ : r^X^I : S : [: 
OUND18J3 , 8 : FORT=lT01j3j3 : NEXTT , X : CL 



Tom McCarthy 



incorrect. Even though most of the games were draws, the 
computer can be beaten in the first two levels of play by 
using the classic "Two-Ways-To-Win" scenario. 

By using this strategy, the computer gives a surprising 
message (I won't tell you what it is); a nice touch. On 
the impossible-to-beat level, it lives up to its name; after 
playing at least a half hour, every game resulted in a draw. 

However, this version of the game is not a total bed 
of roses; there are some thorns. The problem areas are 
threefold; one major, one minor, and one irritating. 

The major problem is that in playing against the 
computer, while using the arrow keys, the computer quite 
often (approximately 75 percent of the time) automatically 
gave me the key center block without having me supply 
any input. This occurred regardless of whether or not I 
had the first move. The minor problem is that in games 
where seven or eight blocks are filled and there is no possible 
way for either opponent to win, the game must be finished 
with all blocks filled to its inevitable conclusion of a draw. 
The irritating problem again concerns playing against the 
computer. After winning a match, I was given a "razzing" 
tone; certainly poor sportsmanship by my electronic 
adversary. 

Nevertheless, the youngster who is having his first 
exposure to Tic-Tac-Toe should find the game enjoyable 
and at only $4.95, well worth the expenditure. 

(Draco Software, 22 Lassell St., Portland, ME 04102, $4.95) 

■^ Dan Smith 



- (For this winning one4iner contest entry, the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book Of Simulations ^ and its companion /?ai/i6ow 

\:- Simulations-Tap^ 



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"A high quality product ... slick presentations" Hot CoCo, 8/84 
.* Easy to Use, Menu-Driven Operation with 37 Page Manual. 

* Nine Graphing Symbols and Unlimited Overlay of Data Seta. 

* Automatically Scales and Labels fill 7hr»» of the Axes. 

* Calculates Math Functions, Integrals and Moving Averages. 

* Works with all CoCo models - requires Extended BASIC. 

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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 215 



Software Review! 



Hardware Review! 



r/^\ 



Go On An ? Eeblewalker' Hunt 
With LINER 



Triple Joyport Switcher Saves 
Wear and Tear On Your CoCo 



Software documentation can be misleading. A perfect 
example is the documentation/ directions I received with 
a program called LINER, by Michael Stuller. LINER needs 
at least a 16K ECB CoCo and comes on cassette. The 
documentation is quite adequate, but misleading. 

The background tells of a strange, rectangular planet 
called Oktry, which is inhabited by Eeblewalkers. You, 
being an Oktrite, make your living by hunting Eeblewalkers. 
It goes on to say that as you move about the planet, you 
dig a trench, which if fallen into, will cause you to tumble 
to your death. 

After reading the background, I had visions of neat little 
graphics creatures running around on Oktry with me 
chasing them as I was digging trenches. LINER is simply 
a green screen with a rectangular border which has about 
15 randomly placed blue squares (what you get if you P5ET 
in PMODE 1,1). A yellow line from the left side of the 
screen starts to move to the right. Using the arrow keys, 
you guide the line across the blue squares, "killing" the 
Eeblewalkers. 

If your path crosses the "trench," you die and lose one 
of your three lives. If you successfully "kill" all the blue 
squares, another screen full of squares will appear. Five 
points are scored for each square you destroy, plus a bonus 
for each screen you complete. 

I found LINER to be boring, but decided that it deserved 
a second opinion. I sat my 8- and 12-year-olds down and 
had them play. Both lost interest in about five minutes. 

To sum up this review, my conscience won't allow me 
to say anything other than don't waste your money on 
this one. 

(Michael Stuller, 2 Audubon Place, Rolla, MO 65401, 16K 
ECB, cassette $7.95 plus $1.50 S/H) 



The Triple Joyport Switcher from Spectrum Projects 
is a nice accessory for those of us who use more than 
one product that plugs into the joystick ports. Imagine 
the wasted time, worn out plugs and worn out fingers used 
to switch between one type of joystick to another. 

For instance, suppose a person is an artist, game player 
and aviation expert. There is a specially built joystick 
assembly for the popular graphics program, another 
contraption for some of the flight simulators and the run 
of the mill joystick for "normal" games. Just having to 
switch plugs every time he/she changes programs is 
anything but pleasant. Spectrum Projects also knows that; 
that's why they have come up with the Joyport Switcher. 

First, a description of the switcher. It comes in a generic 
experimenter's box slightly larger than a deluxe joystick. 
Running from the back are four cables: three for the 
different joysticks and one to be plugged into the computer. 
All you have to do is plug the three cables (or less if you 
don't wish to use all of them) into the accessories, and 
the fourth one into the joystick port in back of the computer. 
After that, all you have to do is turn a knob to select 
which one you wish to use. 

Although the box is not very decorative, it is very well- 
constructed and looks "distinguished." The purpose of the 
switcher is not to be attractive, but to save wear and tear 
on the user and the computer, of which it does an excellent 
job. If you ever find yourself unplugging one joystick to 
use another one, you probably will be grateful for this 
product. 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $39.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jim Sewell 



— Paul Austin 



* * 



FOUR STAR SOFTWARE 



GALACTIC FIGHTER 

A fast-paced arcade game with great graphics 
and sound. CoCo at its best! 

Save earth by fighting your way to Dracoz, 
the home world of the invaders. Fly earth's 
secret weapon, 'The Galactic Fighter'. 
Overcome alien ships, missiles and meteor 
showers. Try and survive the deadly laser 
trench. 



32K, one joystick required. 

CASS. $19.95 (U.S.) 
DISK $24.95 (U.S.) 



$24.95 (CDN.) 
$29.95 (CDN.) 



* Write for free catalogue 
Dealer enquiries welcome 
Overseas orders add 10% 



COCO PAINT 

A very advanced, easy-to-use graphics 
development system for a 64K, single-drive 
CoCo!! 

• Supports: keyboard, single joystick, 
mouse or X-pad 

• Mix graphics and text, using built-in or 
user-definable characters and textures 

• Create stamps: rotate, mirror, shrink, 
expand or invert 

• Screen dump to most common printers 

• 300 — 1200 baud modem communications 
capabilites 

• Plus many more excellent features 



DISK $39.95 (U.S.) 



$49.95 (CDN.) 



P.O. BOX 730 

STREETSVILLE, ONTARIO 
CANADA 
L5M 2C2 



BUGS II 

An adventure game with all the excitement of 
arcade action. 

Earth is infested with intelligent killer 
bugs. Find your way through the maze 
and destroy their reactor. However, you 
must fight the bugs all the way! 

New and improved version of the game that 
won the Color Computer Magazine® 
programming contest. 64K required. 



CASS. $19.95 (U.S.) 
DISK $26.95 (U.S.) 



$24.95 (CDN.) 
$32.95 (CDN.) 



Cheque or Money Order 



Add $2.50 shipping 
Ont. Residents add 7% tax 



216 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



CoCo Max Delivers 
An Outstanding Performance 

By Jesse W. Jackson and David L. Tate 

CoCo Max is a sophisticated graphics system that can 
be used to generate, process and edit graphics pictures with 
a single joystick, mouse or touch pad. The program is a 
nearly perfect clone of the Macintosh's Macpaint program. 
Tn fact, we put Mac and CoCo side by side to compare 
the two, but we'll get to that later in this review. 

The disk version comes with a non-copy-protected 
diskette, a program-pak and a 39-page user's manual. The 
diskette contains the CoCo Max system, several pictures, 
and a BASIC program to configure the system for various 
printer models and Baud rates. The program-pak contains 
a high resolution A/D (analog-to-digital) converter with 
a DIN connector for plugging in any device, such as a 
joystick, mouse or touch pad, that can be used on CoCo's 
joystick inputs. 

My diskette contained machine language drivers for 
Gemini-10X/15X, Epson MX and RX, DMP-100, DMP- 
200, DMP-400 and C. Itoh printers. I had to modify the 
Gemini driver for my Gemini 10 because of differences 
between the 10X/15X and 10/15 in graphics mode. The 
Epson MX driver worked well on an EPSON FX-100 the 
first time. 

The program-pak is well-constructed and has the same 
size and appearance of a Radio Shack cartridge. The DIN 
connector for the joystick input is flush, mounted at the 
end of the cartridge for a firm fit. This cartridge contains 
no program ROM, but an eight channel, eight-bit A/D 
for accessing any of the 256 possible horizontal pixels and 
the 192 vertical pixels in the work area. 

This program-pak is needed to optimize CoCo Max's 
performance because CoCo's six-bit A/D limits access to 
64 pixels in each direction at any one time. CoCo's A/ 
D could be scaled by software but at a loss of resolution 
(the cursor steps would be every fourth pixel). A sliding 
window could be used at the expense of the response time 
(the joystick could access every pixel in a 64 by 64 movable 
area and this would require extra processing time). 

The user's manual is comprehensive, complete with 
illustrations and well-organized. You will want to read it 
carefully to discover the full capabilities of CoCo Max, 
such as menu shortcuts and using the SHIFT for special 
effects. 

Description 

First of all, you should look at Colorware's advertisement 
in this issue to visualize how the program presents the 
menu and graphics pictures. Secondly, let's define some 
terms. "Icons" are pictures symbolic of the function to be 
performed. "Pointing" will be defined as positioning the 

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RAINBOWfest CHICAGO 

May 17-19 



program's cursor or arrow pointer with the input device 
(joystick, mouse or touch pad). "Clicking" means pressing 
that device's firebutton. "Dragging" is holding the 
firebutton down while moving the joystick. 

CoCo Max is operated by POINTing and CLICKing. 
The only typing you must do is to enter the filename you 
wish to LORD or 5RVE. You can insert text into the picture 
from the keyboard in several fonts and styles. The shift 
key can be used for special effects, and supplements the 
firebutton. 

You create a picture by selecting tools from the icons 
in the tool kit and using them within the work area. 

When you have selected a tool, the cursor becomes the 
icon of the tool while in the picture area and is an arrow 
pointer in the menu, tool or pattern area. The tool kit 
contains a lasso, editing box, hand, alphanumeric set, paint 
can, spray can, paint brush, pencil, rubber band line, eraser, 
rectangle, rectangle with fill, rounded rectangle, rounded 
rectangle with fill, circle ellipse, circle/ ellipse with fill, free- 
hand shape, free-hand shape with fill, polygon and polygon 
with fill. 

The brush, paint can, spray can, rubber band line and 
fill tools paint in one of 60 selectable patterns at the bottom 
of the page. CLICKing causes the brush to paint its shape, 
the spray can to apply a shot of its pattern, or the paint 
can to fill in an enclosed area where it's poured. The pencil 
draws and the eraser erases while CLICKed. The rubber 
band line and shapes are drawn by DRAGging between 
two points. The shape icons can paint using one of five 
selectable line widths from the line width menu in the lower 
left-hand corner of the page. 

The lasso defines an irregular shape to be captured for 



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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 217 



editing, while the edit box defines a rectangular box for 
editing. This allows rubber stamping of parts of the picture, 
and some other capabilities, too. 

The alphanumeric set allows insertion of text into the 
picture from the keyboard using the selected font and style 
options. Fonts available are Woodhaven, Topeka, 
MonaCoCo, Fort Worth and Paris. Styles are plain, bold, 
italic, outline and shadow. Left, middle and right options 
in the style menu define the alignment of the entered text. 

Display 

A CoCo Max picture consists of two PMDDE 4 screens, 
one atop the other, to give a 512 pixel wide and 384 pixel 
high picture. This is the equivalent of having the top half 
in PMODE 4 , 1 and the bottom half in PMODE 4 , 5 in Extended 
BASIC. CoCo Max will only LORD files with an extension 
of "/ MAX," so you must rename a non-CoCo Max picture 
before you can LORD it into CoCo Max. I was successful 
in using Graphicom\ "GOBIN/ BAS" program to convert 
a Graphicom picture to LDRD into CoCo Max. 

CoCo Max always presents a graphics screen to the user. 
The upper border contains several menu selections that 
can be pulled down to give menu options. You pull the 
menu down by pointing to it and clicking. 

The menu options are graphically displayed under the 
menu selected. You pick the menu option by pointing and 
clicking, too. The menu option pointed to is highlighted 
in reverse video to let you know you've pointed accurately, 
and a checkmark to the left indicates that the option is 
on, absence of a checkmark indicates the option is off. 

The actual work area is about 208 pixels wide by 128 
pixels high. You slide the work area around the picture 
by using the hand in the tool kit. A scroll page option 
in the goodies menu lets you move the entire picture in 
detail. The show page option in the files menu lets you 
visualize the entire picture in reduced detail. 

Features 

The files menu allows you to LDRD, 5RVE, do a directory 
of CoCo Max pictures and PRINT pictures in double-size, 
double strike and single-size modes. You may also CLERR 
the page (erase the picture), undo your last step (re-do 
it, too) or quit to BASIC. My disk version has no provision 
for cassette SAVE or LDRD. 

The edit menu lets you copy, cut, and paste portions 
of a picture to /from the clipboard on the disk. You may 
also invert, clear, fill, trace edges or flip horizontal and 
vertical the pasted portion. 

The goodies menu lets you select an invisible grid of 
8 by 8 pixels that, when turned on, forces the end points 
of lines, boxes and circles to snap and lock on to the grid. 
"Fat bits" is a fixed zoom-in magnification of eight times 
normal size. "Show page" gives you an overall view of 
your picture in reduced detail. "Edit pattern" lets you 
change any of the 60 selectable patterns to a custom one, 
designed by you. "Brush shape" lets you select one of 32 
different shapes for painting. "Brush mirror horizontal" 
and "vertical lets you create symmetrical pictures by 
mirroring your brush strokes about the horizontal and/ 
or vertical center of the page. "Inertia" is a special function 
to smooth out the jerky signal from the touch pad (it's 
not included in the version I have, but the manual discusses 
it). 

Deficiencies 

The major deficiency of CoCo Max is error reporting: 

218 THE RAINBOW June 1985 



it doesn't. I couldn't get CoCo Max to crash, but it doesn't 
report errors such as "disk full," either. I intentionally filled 
a diskette so only five granules remained free. The picture 
1 wanted to save needed six granules. 

CoCo Max SRVEd the picture, but on ly five granules 
of it, and didn't bother to report this to me. The next 
SRVE (the disk is full, now) turned the drive on briefly 
and returned to CoCo Max. The diskette structure was 
not destroyed, but a directory showed that the picture didn't 
get SRVEd. 

Also, I succeeded in saving a file called "1:JUNK" on 
Drive 0; the "1:" was part of the name. Try to KILL that 
from Disk BASIC. CoCo Max has no provision for KILLing 
files. My disk version of CoCo Max is a one-drive system. 
CoCo Max doesn't normally need the system diskette, 
except for certain EDITing functions and to SRVE or LORD 
pictures. 

Though not deficiencies, here are a few things I'd like 
to see added to CoCo Max: multiple drive support; a 
programmable zoom magnification; the ability to stretch 
areas horizontally and/ or vertically; the ability to 5RVE 
and LDRD edited patterns. 

CoCo's CoCo Max vs. Macintosh's Macpaint 

Having seen Macpaint first, 1 was skeptical when I saw 
Colorware's advertisement for CoCo Max, but the 
resemblance hooked me. Putting the two side by side, we 
began to look for Mac's 1 6-bit powerhouse 68000 to outpace 
its smaller eight-bit brother 6809 in CoCo. We were 
surprised at how CoCo stood up to the task! 

Macpainfs picture is black and white, 512 pixels wide 
by 768 pixels high; four times the area of CoCo Max. 
CoCo Max presents an artif acted (more than two colors 
from a two-color mode) color display of a picture, even 
though it's a PMDDE 4 picture. Although CoCo Max can 
paint colored patterns in this mode, the colors change with 
detail and position on the screen, 

Macpaint has a function that allows portions of a picture 
to be stretched horizontally or vertically. Macpaint has 
a file menu that includes new, open, close, revert and print 
catalog. CoCo Max has more patterns to choose from: 
60 versus Macpaint's 38. Macpaint has an additional 
option, "rotate" in the edit menu. Macpaint's goodies menu 
has "introduction" (a help file), while CoCo Max has a 
"scroll page" option. Macpaint has more fonts and styles 
than CoCo Max. 

I was certain Mac would be faster, and it is, but that's 
not to imply CoCo is slow. I did not find myself waiting 
for CoCo Max except a few seconds to fill large areas, 
about half a page, or to capture a detailed area with the 
box edit function. A fill that took CoCo 2.4 seconds took 
Mac 1.3 seconds (remember Mac is filling four times the 
area of CoCo). 

Conclusions 

This software/ hardware graphics system is an outstanding 
buy for the performance achieved. 1 am pleased that 
Colorware's advertisement accurately described the product 
and that their delivery was timely, as promised. 

(Colorware, Inc., 78-03F Jamaica Ave., Woodhaven, NY 
11421, 64K, joystick, mouse or touch pad required, disk 
$69.95 plus $3 S/H) 



Hardware ReviewZ 



r/^\ 



Double CoCo's Serial Port 
With Data Line Switch Box 

All of us have known the pain of wanting to use two 
RS-232 devices on our CoCo's one serial port. Many switch 
devices are already on the market to let you hook up two, 
or even three peripherals to your one port. A new entry 
is Phelan Enterprises' Data Line RS-232 Switch Box. 

The Data Line Switch Box is a device to hook any two 
peripherals to the CoCo's single serial port. It consists of 
a 4" x 2" x 1" plastic box with one cable to hook to the 
CoCo port, and another two cables for peripherals to plug 
into. On the top are two switches to change which peripheral 
the computer is responding to. 

Data Line does exactly what it is advertised to do, but 
I feel it has several shortcomings. The first is the use of 
two toggle switches, both of which must be flipped to switch 
peripherals. Also, the switches have a mysterious center 
position which is not documented. In my testing, I found 
it was very easy to think youVe switched both switches, 
but actually leave one in the center position. 

My second objection is with the price. Data Line is 
advertised at $39.95. Other advertisers in RAINBOW are 
offering similar products at $19.95 and I know of superior 
products of this type at $29.95. These other products offer 
metal casing and one switch to do the job of the two used 
in Data Line. Rather than a professional product, Data 
Line looks like a very well-done project from "Turn Of 
The Screw." 

The only documentation with the product is one page 
of computer print (dot matrix at that) with very skimpy 
instructions. The documentation also gives information on 
your warranty, which is 90 days. 

Dr. Megabyte cannot prescribe this product because 
the bill is too high for the performance delivered. If Phelan 
can lower its price to the point where it matches the 
performance, it would get a much better recommendation. 
As it is, I would have to advise you to carefully look at 
very similar products' prices before buying this one. 

(Phelan Enterprises, 4704 Bluejay Court, Fayetteville, NC 
28304, $39.95) 

— Mark E. Sunderlin 



ADVENTURUS SUPREMUS 4.6B 

Are You tired of the standard medieval or science fiction type 
adventure game? If so, then Adventurus Supremus is for you. 
Funny, and farcical, it offers a change for the experienced 
adventurer, If You have some adventuring experience, this 
is the game for You. 



Send $9.95 (Check or MO) to: 
Bacchus Computer Software 

P.O. Box 265 

Paw Paw, MI 49079 

WE PAY THE SHIPPING! 



/^ 




FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER FROM 

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p.o. box 1299 sequim, wa 98382 



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The highly detailed black & white illustrations put even the best color 
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WAR of the WORLDS Chapter One - The Landing 
SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER - $16.95 

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WAR of the WORLDS Chapter Three - The Last Hope 
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(08) 211 8763 OR 51 4868 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 219 



Software Review! 



TSZ\ 



Aut-O-Start Is Your Cassette 
Program's Best Friend 

If anyone has ever, or ever will have, written a program 
for a tape system to be marketed, your best friend could 
be Aut-O-Start by Spectrum Projects. This amazing 
program will do several things: it will allow you to make 
impressive title screens, auto-load BASIC or machine 
language programs (from cassette), load BASIC programs 
anywhere above PCLEAR 0, and protect your program from 
pirates. 

When you have your program ready to be marketed, 
the first thing you must do is save it to cassette. After 
doing this, you can then put the Aut-O-Start tape in your 
recorder. All that is needed to load and start the program 
is CLOADM, then hitting ENTER. After awhile, the program 
will display a colorful title screen and continue to load 
the program. 

When the program is totally loaded, you will see the 
main menu. This has three options: Create Title Screen, 
Produce Program Tape or End Program. The first choice 
will allow you to create a screen to go with your program. 
Within this option, you are allowed to choose background 
and boundary colors using the up- and down-arrow keys, 
edit the title screen with certain key sequences, save and 
load title screens, and go back to the main menu. While 
editing the title screen, you may change cursor color, reset 



border color, set text mode to allow for text in your title 
screen, move the cursor with or without leaving a trail 
of the selected color or switch between graphics only and 
graphics arid text modes. 

The next option is Produce Program Tape. This will 
lead you to another menu which allows you to define 
parameters, save Aut-O-Start to tape or return to the main 
menu. The parameters to be defined are as follows: "Do 
you wish to have a title screen?" "Is the program in BASIC 
or Machine Language?" "Where does your BASIC program 
start (PCLEflR Values)?" and "Do you wish to protect your 
program?" The first two are self-explanatory. The next 
(start address) is, simply put, a PCLEflR value to use before 
loading the program. 

The final one is the most interesting. The "protection" 
is to protect against most tape-to-disk copy programs and 
against the user breaking the protection by "skipping past" 
the loader section. That is to say, with some protections, 
all you have to do is skip the loader, then load the program 
as you normally would. Aut-O-Start, however, will not 
allow that. After doing all of this, you simply C5AVE or 
CSflVEM your program and Aut-O-Start will do the rest. 

I think Aut-O-Start is an excellent program for those 
who need it to protect a product they are marketing. It 
would be extremely hard for someone to break the 
protection and look at your source code for devious 
purposes. If you need a safeguard, this product is definitely 
for you, 

(Spectrum Projects, Inc., P.O. Box 21272, 93-15 86th Drive, 
Woodhaven, NY 11421, $19.95 plus $3 S/H) 

— Jim Sewell 



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ITEM 


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TOTAL 


C-05 


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n i3.oo 




C-06 


□ 7-M 


□ 13.00 




C-10 


□ f.M 


□ 14.00 




C-12 


□ 7-50 


□ 14.00 




C-20 


□ 8.7S 


□ 16.50 




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U 9M 
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Outside 48 Continental States — Additional 11 
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ORDER NOW . . . MAIL TO - 

|i/\A|f l-f\ 9525 Vassar Ave. #R1 

Ywltll ■%/ Chatsworlh, CA 91311 

ORDER FORM ------------- 

#R1 
Each cassette includes 2 (abets only. Boxes sold separate- 
ly., In Continental U.S. shipment by UPS. If Parcel Post 
preferred, check here, .□ 

Check or M.O. enclosed [_| Send Quantity Discounts Q 
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One-Uner CoMesi W 

A tribute to Roy G, Biv, whom the author first 
met in high school. (Who is he, anyway?) 

The listing: 



J3 PCLS:R$= ,f U6^ 



=3-»» 



:PMODE3: SCREEN! ,#:COLOR4 
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iiiliiil^ :■■■ ■ 



E.L. Higdon 
Grain Valley, MO 



(For this winning one-liner contest entry; the author has been sent copies 
of both The Rainbow Book. Of Simulations and its companion Rainbow 
Simulations Tape.) 



220 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



Adventurus Supremus 4.6B: 
A Departure From The Usual 

I found myself standing at the front door of a house. 
Looking around, I saw a doormat under me, a door to 
the north and a road to the south. Hesitantly, I walked 
through the doorway, and that's when the fun began. 

This is how I started Bacchus Computer Software's 
Adventure, Adventurus Supremus 4.6B. Supremus is a 16K 
BASIC, text-only Adventure game set in a pseudo-modern 
setting. The object of the game is to figure out a special 
verb and to apply it in a specific setting. 

The documentation accompanying Supremus is quite 
thorough. It covers loading the game, running it, how to 
win, how to play an Adventure, how to contact Mr. 
Marcelletti for advice, and a verb list as well as a couple 
of other things! 

The Adventure itself is not of the standard genre. Most 
of the locations are within a house, but there is also a 
gazebo and a desert with sand stretching for miles and 
miles. I encountered a big, mean ogre, as well as a calm 
looking man. The room descriptions were colorful and gave 
a sense of actually being there. A couple of situations (which 
I shall not name for fear of giving away anything) I've 
seen in other Adventures. These do not really detract from 
the Adventure, though. 

There are, however, some bad points about Supremus 
that I must bring up in order to be fair to the readers 
of this review. First of all, I found it slightly annoying 
that the Adventure did nothing to tell you if it didn't 
understand what you just typed in. Also, the use of "OK" 
as a prompt is almost maddening. I get enough of that 
smug little word in basic, I don't need it in an Adventure, 
also! 

To continue, I found a couple of things offensive, these 
being "R-rated" actions. One of these is pointless, getting 
you killed; the other action you must perform in order 
to progress further in the Adventure. Lastly, in order to 
run this Adventure on a 16K ECB computer, you must 
perform the infamous PCLEPR with a POKE 25,6, etc. 
I have no objection to this if the program truly will not 
fit into less space, but Supremus is written in a very 
inefficient way and could be written so the PCLERR 
wouldn't be needed. 

All in all, Supremus is not a bad Adventure when one 
considers the price. It could be more efficient, and the 
R-rated actions really aren't necessary in this Adventure. 
I'm probably being picky, but I would not suggest this 
Adventure be purchased for young children. Also, 
Supremus is not the easiest Adventure I've ever played, 
so novices beware! 

This is one of the lowest priced Adventures I've ever 
seen. If you really want to play something "different," buy 
Adventurus Supremus 4.6B; for $9.95, it's a good deal. 

(Bacchus Computer Software, P.O. Box 265, Paw Paw, 
MI 49079, cassette $9.95 includes S/H) 

— Lewis R. Jansen 




Improve your performance at the track! These 
16K programs for Thoroughbred, Harness and 
Greyhound racing let you rank the horses or dogs in 
each race quickly and easily, even if you've never 
handicapped before! All the information you need is 
readily available from the Racing form, thorough- 
bred or dog track program. We even provide a 
diagram showing you where to find it! 

Thoroughbred factors include speed, distance, 
past performance, weight, class, jockey's record, 
beaten favorite and post position. Harness factors 
include speed, post position, driver's record, break- 
ing tendencies, class, parked-out signs and beaten 
favorite. Greyhound factors include speed, past per- 
formance, maneuvering ability, favorite box, class, 
kennel record, beaten favorite and breaking ability. 

Data entry is quick and easy. Handicap a race in 
minutes! Complete instructions and wagering guide 
tell you which races to bet and which to avoid. 
Thoroughbred, Harness and Greyhound Handicap- 
pers sold separately at $34.95 each on tape or disk. 




Baseball Statpak! 



Your Little Leaguer, manager or coach will love 
these Big-League stats! This package of 16K Ext. 
Basic programs will track your hitters, pitchers and 
teams, with beautiful screen displays and printouts. 
Batter's Scorecard keeps records of 180 hitters, 
including AB, hits, batting average, RBI's, home 
runs, walks, strikeouts and On Base Percentage. 
Pitcher's scorecard includes games and innings 
pitched, earned runs, ERA, hits, walks, strikeouts 
and won-lost record. Team Scorecard keeps team 
standings for an entire league. Lightning fast sort by 
any statistic for incredible reports! Whether you're 
involved in Little League, high school, college or 
company softball, Baseball Statpak will make you 
an instant winner! $28.95 on tape, $31.95 on disk. 

Federal Hill Software 

825 William Street 

Baltimore, Md. 21230 

Toll Free (Orders Only) 800-245-6228 

For Information Call 301-547-1447 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 221 



Software Review! 



PBl Mustang Attack 

Flight Simulator Takes You 

On A WW II Aerial Battle 

Imagine sitting in the cockpit of a WW 11 P51 Mustang 
fighter. While getting a full load of fuel and ammo, you 
review your mission: "Take off, find and destroy enemy 
fighters, and capture enemy fields if possible." This is the 
object of the P51 Mustang Attack Flight Simulator 
produced by Tom Mix. 

P51 is an excellent Simulation. Unlike other Simulations, 
you can play by yourself, or with two computers hooked 
together either directly or through a modem. 

The one-player version is usually used to get acquainted 
with the Simulation. The "enemy" in this mode is a drone 
that keeps on the same course and doesn't fight back. 
Although you don't do much fighting in this version, you 
can shoot down the drone for practice. T like using this 
version just as a regular flight simulator since it has the 
same basic elements as other flight simulators. 

With two CoCos hooked together or through modems 
(the modem is a little slower), it is especially fun because 
the two computers are independent of each other. During 
this time, you can use any of the modes. It is not like 
other two-player games/ Simulations where you both attack 
the same thing for points, but you attack each other, trying 
to shoot down your opponent's plane. 



IMAGINE! n 

* A language that, inherently with logical line 
instructions* lets YOU accomplish, in 32 or 64K! 

* Up to 40 ML programs RUNNING at the same time, 
with program and/or data overlays, 
-Demonstration program runs 10 programs - 

* Programs interchange between CC and CC II* 

* Treating disk files as virtual memory. 

* Inserting machine code directly into memory # 

* Creating source programs with line numbers as 
CC BASIC -or- in your ASCII output Editor, 

* Creating ML overlay segments as elements and 
linking them under a master control program 
-an overlay library-i 

* Linking ML programs from your assembler into 
overlays or in your master control program. 

* Usiftg the almost 88 K available in 64K machines 

* Running all this with Disk Extended Color 
Basic (1.0 or 1, !>.*** All in ML**** 

*** BACKUP AND COPIES OF PROGRAM DISK ALLOWED ** 
NO SPECIAL OPERATING SYSTEM REQUIRED. 

LFAST -BEYOND ASSEMBLY- 
IF YOU HAVE THE DESIRE TO DO SOMETHING REALLY 
SPECTACULAR IN ML-THEN-LFAST IS FOR YOU. 

Program disk with demo programs and Owners 
Manual $68,50. Manual separate $8.50 
FLORIDA residents add 5% State sales tax. 
TO ORDER OR FOR MORE INFORMATION 
CALL 305-783-2713 OR WRITE D. J, LEFFLER 
955 TRINIDAD ROAD ,COCOA BEACH, FL, 32931 
(please send check or money order. NO C.G.D/S) 



It takes at least 15 hits to shoot the other person down, 
so it's not one of those one-hit-and-itVall-over type 
Simulations. Each hit before destruction of the craft causes 
some sort of damage which T'll talk more about later. 

There are four modes in which you can play. Peace is 
self-explanatory as is the war mode. In the "talk" mode, 
if you're playing through the modem or directly connected, 
the program will cause a distinct beeping sound on both 
computers. This will alert the other person that you want 
to talk. If he/she switches to this mode, the game will 
freeze and you can pick up the phone and talk to each 
other without messing up the game presently going on. 

The last mode, turkey, is the equivalent of challenging 
the other player to a fight and if he answers it, the 
Simulation automatically switches to the war mode. 

P51 offers four quadrants. In each quadrant, there is 
a north-south runway. When playing by yourself, you can 
land safely at any field, but during dogfight mode, you 
can only land on your own fields. You start out with two 
fields and can gain more by shooting out the beacons next 
to your opponent's field five times. When you land on 
your own field, you get a full load of bullets and fuel. 

Unlike other flight Simulations, you have a radar you 
can access while flying to find your enemy's position. Also, 
there are three skill levels which determine how many bullet 
holes are inflicted by each hit. Some of the damages I 
mentioned before include: reduction of your engine power, 
guns jamming, can't reduce/ increase power, landing gear 
breaking or some of your instruments malfunctioning. 

There are two negative points I feel are worth talking 
about. The first thing is that the graphics are limited. About 
the only things shown are your instruments, cross hairs 
(target finders), airfield markers and the enemy plane. The 
horizon is shown by the line where the ground and sky 
meet. The documentation explains that the programmer 
lives in Kansas and has never seen a hill. 

The other problem will be evident to the people who 
buy flight Simulations just for the real life experience; they 
will notice there is no rudder control. This is for ease in 
the Simulation. The documentation explains that a rudder 
is not needed and why. 

All in all, P51 Mustang Attack Flight Simulator is a 
very good and realistic Simulation. I think it's worth the 
money and recommend it. 

(Tom Mix Software, 4285 Bradford N.E., Grand Rapids 
MI, 49506, tape $29.95, disk $34.95) 

— Donald A. White 



NEW PRODUCT 
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16208 Hickory Knoll 
Houston, TX 77059 



222 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



Software Review! 



SBASIC - BASIC 
With A Foreign Accent 

After spending a few hours reading and pondering over 
the user's manual for this program, I was reminded of 
my efforts to learn pidgin English during my wanderings 
among the South Pacific Islands. In those days, I began 
to wonder why the natives could not just learn the English 
word "piano," instead of saying "big box beatem teeth noise 
come out." Some of SBASICs user's manual language is 
equally as frustrating. 

The user's manual describes SBASIC as a machine 
language utility to convert structured BASIC commands into 
Color BASIC. 

After spending many hours trying to understand and 
operate this program, following the manual and trying all 
the samples in the manual with confusing results, I invested 
a few dollars in a telephone call to the author in Canada. 
I told him I thought most of his prospective purchasers 
of SBASIC would be nonexpert programmers who would 
like to have clearer and more detailed instructions. I asked 
that he send me step-by-step instructions on how to use 
at least two of his examples. I received a sheet to be inserted 
into the user's manual, but it adds little to clarity. 

My next step was to prepare several short programs 
which I thought would demonstrate the use of SBASIC, 
and ask SBASIC to work its magic on them. I found that 
the Compile portion of the program would change some 
pidgin into English, and make certain translations from 
SBASIC to Color BASIC 

The Pack portion of the program eliminated leading 
blanks and unnecessary colons which were placed in the 
test programs to make them easier to read when printed. 
Pack, however, did not take out other unnecesary spaces 
nor combine lines to reduce the number of bytes 
unnecessarily consumed by the program. 

I could see no great improvement over CoCo's Extended 
BASIC. The first three examples given in the user's manual 
are examples of SBASICs substitute for BASIC'S FOR^NEXT 
statement: 

Example 

10 I=l:Total=0 

20 LOOP 

30 : TQTRL=TDTRL+PRRT(I) ) 

40 : 1=1+1 

50 UNTIL (TaTflL>1000) 

G0 END 

When the first example was put through the Compiler, 
the only change was that Line 20 was changed to 20 REM, 
but indicated an SN Error in Line 10. When put through 
the Pack portion of the program, the result was to eliminate 
the colon and leading spaces in lines 30 and 40. The second 
example resulted in an SN Error in Line 20. The third 
example had similar results. 

Two examples were given of SBASICs substitute for 
BASIC'S IF/THEN/ELSE. 

Example 

10 5IF(R>127)THEN 
20 : fi=fi-128 



30 : PRINT"NUMBER WRS TOO LRRGE" 

40 ELSE 

50 : PRINT"NUMBER OK" 

60 ENDIF 

70 END 

Are these really improvements over BASIC? 

It could be likely I was doing something wrong, but 
I followed the user's manual to the letter, time after time. 
I believe that this is the proper way to review a program: 
The reviewer should follow the instructions exactly. The 
program and the manual must be taken as a package and 
if the package, taken as a whole, does not work, it is in 
need of revision. 

If one has written a long program in easy-to-read form, 
and wishes to eliminate the colons and blanks which have 
been inserted just to make it easy to read, the Pack portion 
of SBASIC would be useful in "tightening up" the program. 
To me, this would be the most valuable part of SBASIC. 
However, similar "Pack" programs are in the public 
domain. I do not believe I would use the other parts of 
the program, as I do not see any great advantage of the 
SBASIC language over Extended BASIC language. 

The least that Tandar Software should do is rewrite the 
user's manual so an average, novice programmer could 
easily understand it and operate the program from the 
information in that manual. 

(Tandar Software, 12 Araman Drive, Agincourt, Ontario, 
Canada MIT 2P6; $19.95 U.S., $24.95 Canadian) 

— Charles L. Redman, Jr. 



TRS-80+ MOD I, III, COCO, TI99/4a ^ 
TIMEX 1000, OSBORNE, others 

GOLD PLUG - 80 

Eliminate disk reboots and data loss due to oxi- 
dized contacts at the card edge connectors. 
GOLD PLUG 80 solders to the board edge con- 
nector. Use your existing cables, (if gold plated) 







COCO Disk Module (2) 
Ground tab extensions 
Disk Drives (all R.S.) 
Gold Disk Cable 2 Drive 
Four Drive Cable 

USA shipping $1.45 

Foreign $7 Don't wait any longer 

Available at your favorite dealer or order direct from 

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Can/Mex $4. 

TEXAS 5% TAX 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 223 




Computer Island Educational Software 



PROGRAM TITLE 



GRADES MEMORY PRICE PROGRAM TITLE 




PRESCHOOL 

Preschool I * counting Pre-K 16K Ext 

Preschool Jt - adding Pre-K 16K Ext. 

Preschool III - alphabet Pre-K 16K Ext. 

Music Marvel play songs Pre K.1 16K-Ext. 

Arrow Games - 6 games Pre-K, 1 32K-Ext 

First Games - 6 games Pre-K. 1 32K-Ext. 

Mr Cocohead-facernaker K-3 16K-Ext 

Benlley Bear Pry-K 32K-Dtsk 

LANGUAGE ARTS 

Beyond Words 13 parts 3 5 32K-Exi. 

Beyond Words 2-3 parts 6-8 32K-Ext. 

Beyond Words 3-3 parts 9-12 32K-Ext 

Vocabulary MOOD words 3-5 32K-Ext. 

I Vocabulary 2-1000 words 6-8 32K*Ext 

Vocabulary 3-1000 words 9-12 32K-EXL 

Context Clues 4 r 5.6,or 7 16K-Ext 

Cocojot - jotto game 3*up 16K 

Reading Aids - 4 parte 2-4 16K-EX1, 

King Author - writrng tool 2-6 16/32 Ext, 

Cocowheel of Fortune 4-up 32K-tape * 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
French Basebali-200wds 4~up 
French Baseball-500wds. 4-up 
Spanish Baseball-200wds 4-up 
Spanish Baseball-SQOwds 4-up 
Italian Basebah-200wds. 4 up 
Hebrew Alphabet beginners 

Hebfew Utility crrawwg ui»i»ty 

CRITICAL THINKING PROBLEMS 

Factory by Sunburst 4 up 

Pond by Sunburst 2-up 

Teasers by Tobbs-Sunb, 4 up 
Inner City - simulation 7-up 
Find The Math Sequence 4-up 
Stranded-graphic advent. 4-up 

TEACHER/STUDENT AIDS 

Colorgrade gradebook Adult 
Quizmaker - write quizzes 5-up 
ETT typtng tutor ttajcawar©**^ 4-up 

The PuZZler [ColftrCftnnfitlitiA) 4-up 



16K-Ext. 
32K-EXI 
16K-Ext. 
32KExt, 
16KExt, 
16K-Ext 
16K-Ext. 



32Kdisk 
32K~disk 
32K-disk 



11,95 
1 1 .95 

1195 
11,95 
21 95 

24.95 
16 95 
29,95 



19.95 
1995 
19.95 
19.95 
19 95 
19.95 
17.95 
11.95 
19.95 
29.95 
19.95 



11.95 
19^95 
11,95 
19.95 
11.95 
11 95 
15.95 



39,95 
39,95 
3995 





MATH 

Dollars & Sense 

McCoco s Menu 

Moneypak 

Graph Tutor 

Graph-It 

Malh Invaders 

Mathquiz - 4 operations 

Addition & Subtraction 

Crocodile Math - joystick 2-5 

Skill Tutor Series 
Division Tutor 3-7 

Multiplication Tutor 3-7 

Factors Tutor 5*6 

Fractions Tutors a p<$ransj 

-iutfitnm -uMidetmn m mullein, ii'njh 4-8 

Trigonometry 
Equations Linear 
Equations Quadratic 
Afilh. Diagnostic Disk 
Fraction Diagnostic Disk 4-9 

Verbal Problems Series 
Distance Problems 5-8 

Area & Perimeter 5-8 

Pizza Game 3-5 

Sales & Bargains 6 8 



SOCIAL STUDIES 

Know Your States 
History Game 
Slates & Capitals 
Explorers & Settlers 
Famous American Women 
Street Map Game 

MISCELLANEOUS 



5-up 
5-up 
5-up 
4-up 
6-up 
35 



32K-disk 


49.95 


Name That Song 1.2.or 3 2^up 


16K-Exl. 


11.95 


32K-Ext 


19 95 


Circus Adventure 


1-3 


16K 


11.95 


32K-disk 


24.95 


Schoolmaze Adventure 


1-4 


16K 


11.95 






Treasure Hunt - joystick 


1-5 


16K-tape' 


19.95 






Picnic - 2 arcade games 


3-up 


16K-Ext, 


11,95 


32Kdisk 


29.95 


Music Drill 


3-up 


16K-Exl. 


19.95 


32K-Ext. 


24.95 


Science Game 


8-up 


32K-disk 


29,95 


16K-Ext 


21,95 


Computer Literacy 


6-up 


32K-ExL 


1995 


32Kdlsk 


23.95 


5 Educational Programs 












with Lightpen 


1-2 


32K-disk 


44.95 



tape* - indicates available on tape only, 
add $5,00 for any program on disk. 







The Educational Answers 



■^ 



LIGHTPEN PROGRAMS 

Grades 1-2. SPECIAL EDUCATION 

LIGHTPEN PROGRAMS 

Grade$ 3-6, SPECIAL EDUCATION 

32KE.B. S44 9S Each, 

INCLUDING LIGHTPEN 

Five menu driven educational pre- 
grams on each disk designed for 
early elemenlary or upper elemen 
tary students, or as an alternative 
for those children who have dil- 
ficuSty using the Keyboard Grade 
appropriate material on each disk 
covering, reading readiness and 
math for early grades, and math, 
social studies and sciences for the 
upper grades Hi - res graphics 
and text combined on the screen 
Light pen included, 



COCO WHEEL OF FORTUNE 
32KE8 S19J5 TAPE ONLY 

Hi- res graphics and screen in this 
version of the popular TV show 
One or two players Spin the wheel 
for points and guess a letter |rj 
solve the puzzle. Over 225 
puzzies Have'' fun while 
strengthening language arts 
skills. 



I LOVE MY COCO 

TEE SHIRT 

$6.95 each * S1.0DS/H par shirt 

Available In Adult Sizes 

S, M. L. XL, and Youth L (14-16) 

White with Red Trim 

and Blue Logo 

TREAT YOURSELF OR A FRIEND 

TO A GREAT GIFT. 

CALL US FOR DETAILS 

ON SCHOOL/CLUB ORDERS. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

Dealers inquiries invited. 



<J j- J '. ??> ^B B&> 



tw\ RglTWi 



• miff.* ***vtt*/iM« 



The Factory: *** su™st 
Strategies In Problem Solving 

Grades 4 -adult Winner 1983 Learning 
Software Award. Recommended In 
Classroom Computer Learning, 
Courseware Report Card and Electronic 
Learning Unique three-level prop/ am 
challenges students to create geometric 
products" on a simulated machine 
assembly line which the student designs. 
Diskette tor 32K TRS SO Color 
rr;mpuier Attn Emended Color BASIC 
S39 95 

The Pond; nwi slmsbt 
Strategies In Problem Solving 

Grades 2 -adult. Winner 1983 Learning 
Software Award. Recommended in 
Classroom Computer Leartng A small 
green frog, lost in a pond of lily pads. 
helps students recognize and articulate 
patterns, generalize from raw data and 
think logically Diskette 

tor 32K TRS-80 Color Computer with Ex- 
lended Color BASIC $39 95 



STRANDED 32K EB 

$24 95 DISK ONLY 

A fully graphic adventure in which 
you are an astronaut stranded on 
the moon, Your space ship cannot 
be repaired and you must gel back 
to earth, Inventory displayed on 
screen at all times Save and re 
ioad at any time. Map included, if 
you wish to use it An entertaining 
way to improve critical thinking 



BENTLY BEAR'S LETTERS, 
NUMBERS AND SHAPES 
32KE.B J29.95D.Sk 

An excellent preschool program on 
disk that reinforces the learning of 
letters, numbers and shapes 
Correct responses are rewarded 
hy a hi res Bentiy Bear. Musical 
accompaniment in 4 part harmony 
Delightful learning tor ine young 
child Beautiful graphics and 
sound 



STREET MAP GAME 
$19.95 Tape 



32KE.B 
$24.95 Disk 



Hi - res screen ana graphics por- 
tray a typical section of a street 
map This one shows people's 
homes, me school, tne park, me 
post office, etc. Questions aFe ask- 
ed on how to get from one place to 
another and the footsteps are 
shown after response A fun way 
1o improve mao skifls. 



BINARY DICE GAME 32KE.B. 
519.95 Cassette $24.95 Disk 

Learn lo work with Dinary 
numbers. Makes the binary 
system clear and understandable 
Two levels Learn to convert from 
binary to regular numbers. A great 
enhancement to any computer 
literacy program for groups or in- 
dividuals. Sei Df binary dice in 
eluded 



SCIENCE GAME $29.95 

by J. Keeling 32KEB, Disk Only 
uver 600 questions m 9 
caiegones Makes learning 
science tacts fun. Game format, 
i or 2 pfayers. teams Grade B and 
up 



Computew^ 



All payment in U.S. funds. 



(718)948-2748 

Dept. R 227 Hampton Green, Staten Island, N.Y. 10312 

Send for catalog with complete descriptions. 

Please add $1 .00 per order for postage. N.Y. residents, please add proper tax. FREE set of BINARY DICE. including full directions, with orders Of 2 or more Items 



Authors: We are seeking gua»ty children's software tor leisure or learning. Write for details. Top Royalties. 
TRS-flO Color Computer. TD pSysteffl 100, 



CORRECTIONS 

"PERT" (March 1985, Page 140): Jorge Mir tells us he's 
had some reports of problems having to do with various 
printers. PERT was written for the Okidata Microline 92 
printer, and these special effects codes are used: 

CHR$ ( 12 ) Feed paper to beginning of next page 

(most printers have this) 
CHR$ ( 28 ) Select elite font (96 chars/ line) 

CHR$(29) Select compressed font (132 chars/ line) 

CHR${30) Select normal font (80 chars/ line) 

CHR$ ( 31 ) Switches on double-emphasized mode 

If you have some other printer, you will need to change 
the printer codes contained in lines 1740, 1800, 1810, 2320, 
2330, 2470, 2480 and 2500 to make the special modes work 
with your printer. If your printer does not have the elite 
(96 characters per line) font, the compressed font will work. 
Also, on most other printers you will need to use two modes 
(emphasized and double-strike) in combination to create 
the double-emphasized mode. 

The Okidata printers automatically clear the double- 
emphasized mode when changing fonts; if your printer 
doesn't, you will need to insert the necessary codes as well. 

If your printer doesn't have the form feed function, 
change the following two lines to read as follows: 



EMPLOYER to allow editing of state taxes: 



1800 IF INT(l/58) - 1/58 THEN FO 
R XX = lT06:PRINT#-2," i, sNEXTX 
1810 NEXT I 



Finally, all users should change the word PRINTRICfiL 
in Line 2400 to read CRITICRL. 

"Restoring BASIC Programs" (April 1985, Page 14): 

Richard Benton advises us that our description of his 
program was incorrect. First, he says the version given 
will only work on disk systems because the machine 
language code falls in the cassette 1/ O buffer area. To create 
a cassette version, change lines 10 and 40 to read as follows: 



10 


CLS: 


FORI=600TO630s 


READA$ 


:POKE 


I 


,VAL( 


■&H"+A$) iNEXT 






40 


CSAVEM" RESTORE" ,600,6 30, 


600 



It should be emphasized that the BASIC program creates 
disk or cassette copies of the ML code, and the resulting 
saves are the program that actually does the work. If you 
were to load the basic program after the system crashes, 
it would replace the program you are trying to recover. 
(If you have a cassette system, you may want to keep the 
ML program on a separate tape.) 



"CoCo Becomes The Paymaster" (March 1985, Page 58 
and April 1985, Page 82): Dennis Weide informs us that 
a few changes need to be made in the EMPLOYER and 
CKWRITER programs. Add the following lines to 



14650 PRINT'STATE TAX 


TOTAL" :INP 


UT B1$:IF Bl$=" THEN 


14700 ELSE 


TL=VAL(B1$) 




15550 PRINT"STATE TAX 


TOTAL" :INP 


UT B1$:IP Bl$="" THEN 


15600 ELSE 


YL=VAL(Bl$) 





Edit the following lines in EMPLOYER to read as 
follows: 



14600 PRINT"FED 


. INC. 


TOTAL": I NP 


UT B1$:IP Bl?=" 


" THEN 


14650 ELSE 


TP=VAL(B1$) 






15500 PRINT"CONTRIBUTIONS": INPUT 


B1$:IP Bl$="" 


THEN 15550 ELSE Y 


C-VAL(B1$) 







Edit the following lines in CKWRITER to read as follows 
(to allow printing of first names with over six characters): 



17300 FOR Q=l TO LEN(A$):IP MID$ 
(A$,Q,2)=* " THEN NA$=LEPT$ ( A$ , 
Q) :GOTO17500:ELSE NA$=A$ 
17500 FOR Q=l TO LEN(B$):IF MID$ 
(B$,Q,2)=" " THEN NB$=LEFT$ (B$ , 
Q) :GOTO17700:ELSE NB$=B$ 



"We Want Our Q-NERD!"(May 1984, Page 175): Jerry 
Forsha tells us that two lines have to be modified for use 
on the Color Computer 2 or any other CoCo that has 
the Color BASIC 1.2 ROM: 

Delete Line 1, then edit Line 55 to read as follows: 



55 SCREEN1 , : SC=0 : Y2=56 : M=3 : YP=1 
70:03:CS=1:SS=4000:INKEY$ = "":GO 
TO10 



Routing Switcher (April 1985, Page 32): Michael Lill tells 
us that there are some errors in the schematic diagram 
on page 33. Here is the corrected schematic: 



Figure 1 



ROUTING SWITCHER 

-232 — 



SWITCH 
.. CPU1 




*Scc article for proper c> 

••CPU#I can monitor other outputs with "-J-" Jumpers as shown 



Drawing is from connection side 



226 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



A steal at any price. Darn near a felony at these prices. 



SDOS® 

Real Disk Operating System 

and Professional Software Tools 

Full 2-Pass Assembler 

Text Editor 

6809 Debugger 

Fully interrupt driven 

Disk buffer pool/LRU cache 

Supports up to 4 drives 

Date-stamped file backup utility 

Disk disaster recovery utility 
RSDOS data file transfer utility 

Friendly command interpreter 

User-definable error messages 

Keyboard typeahead at all times 

(not just when disks are idle) 

Screen-edit style input editing 

Full ASCII keyboard (inc. CTRL) 

Software selectable baud rates 

Full serial I/O to 19.2Kb 

thru RS Modem cartridge 

400+ pages documentation 

only $49.95! 

SD BASIC Compiler 

Full-featured language 

Tight code, fast execution 

(3X times faster than RSBASIC 

doing Prime Number search) 

FOR 1=1 to 10000/NEXTI 

takes 1 .8 second (1 2X faster) 

A=1 takes 2 bytes of memory 

(not counting Runtime Package) 

Automatic runtime integer/ 

floating point optimization 

32 letter variable/label names 
True Subroutine/Functions with 

named, multiple arguments 

WHILE-DO and IF-THEN-ELSE 

All execution errors trappable 

Fast, 65K char string facilities 

Assembly language interface 

Fast Decimal f.p. arithmetic 
(no money conversion errors!) 

Cursor positioning 

Print USING 

Device-independent ASCII and 

binary file I/O to the byte 

Indexed file option available 

$49.95 (requires SDOS) 
Not RSBASIC compatible 



SEDIT/TYPE: Word Processing 

SEDIT: full screen text editor 

Place cursor and start typing! 

What-you-see-is-what-you-get 

Typeahead and autowrap on margin 

"No wrap" mode for programs 

Edits files up to 80Kb 

Global Search/Change 

SEDIT or SDOS can use 24 by 80 

CRT via modem card with multipak 

TYPE: Document Processor 

Formats raw text mode with SEDIT 

according to embedded commands 

Automatic justification 

Automatic pagination 

Definable page titles/footings 

Automatic page numbering 

Centering 

Foreign language accents 

Multiple file merge 

(for big documents or mailings) 

Table of Contents generation 

Semi-automatic index generation 

" 150+ pages documentation 

$49.95 (requires SDOS) 

CHESSD ™: A REAL CoCo Chess Program 



Move wb S4dT 
Move #15 
Score 338 
E-=.t -39 
W clock 0:3 
B clock 8:4 
Skill 4 4 





i==3 


3 










L-V-J 




'fr 










rvj 






■ 








B 


~j£~ 


Etl 






Hi 




■ 




i 




w 


















i 






III 


* 




T 






M 


m 


Idi 


Ew9 


Jl 








SH 




ESiJ 


A 







h g 

CHECK ! 



High resolution display 

High quality play 

Variable skills levels 

Plays Black or White 

Can act as referee 

Accepts Algebraic-like notation 

Handles and plays special moves 

Castle, En Passant, Pawn Promote 

Tournament/Rapid Transit Modes 

Tournament timer logic built-in 

32,000 move disk opening book 

$49.95 (does NOT require SDOS) 



i 



All products require Color Computer with 64K and at least one disk drive. 



1 



» 



COMPUTER SYSTEMS DISTRIBUTORS 

P.O. Box 9769 

Anaheim, California 92802 

(714)772-1390 



Visa and Mastercharge accepted. 
Shipping charges $2.00 per order. 
Dealer inquiries invited. 
Software consulting also available. 



®SD0S is a registered trademark of Software uynamics. 
'"CHESSD is a trademark of Software Dynamics. 



% 



v& 



LOWEST PRICES 



Derringer Software Announces That Derby City 
Now Carries The Complete Pro-Color-Series 



m 



COMMUNICATIONS 

COLORCOM/E (Spectrum) (ROMPAK/Disk) $47.95 
Complete smart terminal package! Upload, download. 
Hi-Res screen - 300' 1200 RAUD - Off line printing, 
*Disk version with CoCo Sig & TBBS! Download ML* 
Supports: XMODEM & Auto-dial modems. 

CQLQRAMA BBS (Spectrum) (64K Disk) $97.95 

The best - Full featured BBS package for the CoCo. 
Especially geared for the CoCo users - Includes an orders 
section for running a mail-order business. Supports color 
graphics - Rainbow review July '84. 
COLORAMA BBS TIME MODULE $59.95 

DATABASE MANAGEMENT 

PRO-COLOR-FILE Enhanced 2.0 (Derringer) $57.95 
*** The premier database program for your CoCo *** 
" Compatible for DYNACALC and TELEWRITER files ** 
4000 -r record capacity - 60 data fields each record 
1020 byte records and true multiple drive support! 
'Formats 8 reports - 4 screens - 6 labels Formats" 
Fast ML sorts, (750 records in 5 minutes), sort by three 
fields, re-sort file on any field. Key ctick auto key repeat 
- Global search - Indexed records! 

PRO-COLOR-FORMS 2.0 (Derringer) $27.95 

Access data files created from PRO-COLOR-FILE then 
merge them with a tetter or print on a pre-pnnted form 
or print on tractor fed index cards or , . . etc. Menu driven 
6 formats - Place fields anywhere in text - Merge graphics 
from MASTER DESIGN. Includes all the user friendly 
features in PRO-COLOR-FILE. 

EZBASE (Spectrum) (Disk) $21.95 

A truly user friendly - Less complicated aata base program 
at an affordable price, maintain 15 fields in 500 records. 
Hi-res screen - Search by records or by fields - Mailing 
labels - Reviewed July '84. 

SPREADSHEET 

DYNACALC (Derringer) (64K Disk) $79.95 

ACCLAIMED BY ALL THE EXPERTS AS THE BEST & 
FASTEST - Reviewed by Dan Downard, Rainbow, Sep- 
tember 1984 - Reviewed by Scott Norman, HOT CoCo, 
October 1984- Two-way communication with PRO- 
COLOR-FILE Enhanced More features than in VisiCalc, 
But can use VisiCalc worksheets & training materials- 
Auto-Repeat keys 256 Columns or 256 Rows - 51X24 
screen display and lower case - Easy communication 
with BasicDos and TELEWRITER 64 programs - Fast 
16 Digit math - Full Graphics captioning and overlays - 
Use DYNAGRAPH & MASTER DFSIGN to create profes- 
sional graphs/ charts 

DYNAGRAPH (Derringer) (Disk) $18.95 

Transfer DYNACALC graphic file to standard graphic file 
for further enhancing and labeling by graphic editing prog- 
rams such as MASTER DESIGN. 

WORD PROCESSING 

TELEWRITER 64 (Derringer) {T/D) $45.95/$57.95 

* Three Hi-Res screens - Two character sets/screen * 
True lowercase - Right justification - Full screen 
editor. Easily embedded printer commands, logical 
and easy, but powerful commands make this the best 
word processor for your CoCo. Reviewed June '83. 

THE WIZ (Spectrum) $1 9.95 

Adds new character set, with true desenders - Also 
adds visible end of line markers to TELEWRITER 64. 
THE WIZ + TELEWRITER 64 togethGr (T D)$62.90/$72.90 

OPERATING SYSTEM 

XEX (The New FLEX) (Spectrum) (Disk) $99.95 

Includes: 128K support. Disk Drivers: 35, 40 or 80 track, 
1X or 2X sided, density anrl stepping for 40 track drives 
to be used with 80 track drives. Also define stepping 
rates. Modular Construction - User definable keyboard. 
Hi-Res Screens - Supports 3rd party hardware - User 
friendly - Easy to use - One Disk boot - Some system 
source included - RS BASIC compatible with DBASIC. 
Telephone support - ETC. With FHL-O-PAK . $132.90 

SPECTRUM DOS (Disk) $25.00 

Adds 24 NEW COMMANDS! Use it straight or 'burn' it 
into an EPROM for faster processing. Hi- Res screen True 
upper and lower case - Print works in any of the character 
densities, The clear key and the CLS work normally with- 
out control codes - Add any type of drive, change the 
disk seek rates on any or all drives - Auto-key repeat. 
Reset protected - Etc. 

MAJOR UTILITIES 

MLBASIC COMPILER (Spectrum) (Disk) $67.95 

The most comprehensive BASIC Compiler available to 
the CoCo. *' Create machine language from BASIC ** 
1 Completely supports ALL of EXTENDED BASIC com- 
mands plus MLBASIC is all machine language itself!! Full 



FLOATING POINT ARITHMETIC plus other features that 
are not available with Interpreter Basic programs. 

DISK SORT & ORDER (Derby City) (Disk) $16.95 

biiminate all sectored data on diskettes plus save 20 
to 35 percent of the physical life of your disk drives! 
Convert 35 track RS diskettes to JDOS 35 or 40 track 
diskettes & vice versa - Double and single sided drives 

- Alphabetize directory - With * 7 combinations of from 
■ to' diskette formats * 

PRO-COLOR-DIR (Derringer) (Disk) $21.95 

Creates a Master Data file of diskette directories so that 
PRO-COLOR-FILE can sort them out and print you one 
nice master listing. Which includes - Date diskette created 

- Last date diskette was updated! Diskette ID name 
Filename/EXT * File type - Load Exec entry points and 
Length. Number of grans used and the number of sectors 
allocated/used. Also can print out labels you can stick to 
the diskettes!! 

64K DISK UTILITY PACKAGE (Spectrum) $20.00 
Takes advantage of an expanded 64K computer. Makes 
an additional 8K or RAM available. Create a buffer for a 
printer spooler that is as big as 32K - Copy ROM car- 
tridges to disk. Rainbow review July '83. 

DISK UTILITY 2.1 (Spectrum) (Disk) $24.95 

Multiple-featured too! - User friendly - Fast disk I/O for 
format, copy & backup. Utilize a directory window to selec- 
tively: sort, move, rename and kill files. Examine a files 
contents, the Granule table, also finds the size, load & 
entry addresses of all programs. Single command execu- 
tion of both Basic & ML programs. Reviewed Oct. '84. 

COCO CHECKER (Spectrum) (T'D) $19.95 

Somethings wrong with yaur CoCo and you just don't 
know where the problem is? Or even how to run test to 
find the problem?? CoCo CHECKER is your answer! Will 
test: ROMs, RAMs, PIAs, VDG, Joysticks, Clock speeds, 
Printer, Disk Drives and Controller - Also test the 
Keyboard and cassette. Reviewed Jan. '84, 

SPIT-N-IMAGE (Spectrum) (Disk) $29.95 

Super upgrade from Disk Omni-Clone! Backup any non 
standard Disk with ease. We haven't found any disk yet, 
that it can't handle! Don't be caught without a backup 
ever again! Beats most 'copy protection', 

SCHEMATIC DRAFTING PROCESSOR (Disk) $29.95 
Save time and design professional looking diagrams 
using a 480x540 worksheet, w/6 viewing windows and 
over 30 electronic symbols w/10 definable symbols! Print 
hard copy & save to disk. Reviewed Jan. '84. 



-HARDWARE- 



CoCo II 64K Computer (limited quantity) $169.95 
DOS Switch - For J&M and RS controllers. ■ No Sol- 
dering or trace cutting necessary! ■ All Gold Contacts 
- Allows switching of any combination of 24 pm and 28 
pin proms by moving one jumper 

For J&M Controller $21.95 

For RS Controlers $31.95 

JDOS Rom' 1.1 $39.95 

with RS DOS 1 1 $49.95 

with JDOS' 1.1 $62.95 

RS DOS Rom 1.1 S37.95 

'JDOS ROM comes with manual 

Prom Switcher All gold contacts, no soldering. Fits 

ALL CoCo Is. and CoCo Us Switch any combination 
of 24 and or 28 pin PROMS $21.95 

RS-232-C Serial Port Switches 

Two position 

Three position 

Four position 

Five position 



$24.95 
$29.95 
$34.95 
$39.95 



GRAPHIC UTILITIES 

MASTER DESIGN (Derringer) (Disk) $28.95 

TEXT desinger/editor - Generate graphic lettering, Multi- 
ple; font sizes, textures, shadows, thickness and special 
patterns for creative backgrounds also includes: LETTER 
HEAD UTILITY that interfaces with TELEWRITER 64, 
Screen Dump for ail dot matrix type printers (7 & 8 bit) 
and more! Reviewed July '84. 

COCO MAX (Spectrum) (ROMPAK) $69.95 

Includes Icons - Pull down menus - Graphic editing Font 
styles - Point & Click method! You can Spray, Brush or 
Fill with any Color, Shading or Pattern!! Use Rubber Band 
Lines & Shapes (square, rectangle, Circle, ellipse, etc.) 
or even Caligraphy Brushes!! Trace Edge, Invert, Brush 
Mirrors, UNDO & FAT BITS Joystick input -256x1 92 re- 
solution! Needs the Multi Pak or 40 Pin 'Y' cable, "Gotta 
see to believe"! 

GRAPHICOM (Spectrum) (Disk) $23.95 
The original - Advanced - CoCo graphic development 
tool with sophisticated editing, preview animation tele- 
communications and printer support Hi-Res and much 
more! With GRAPHICOM JOYSTICK $48.95 



BJORK BLOCKS (SPECTRUM) (T/D) $33.95 

Powerful graphic utility developed by Steve Bjork. Use 
for designing screens in your on games or just for your 
own pleasure, Has a very efficient storage routine for 
graphics information. (64K animation)! 

SCREEN DUMP - UTILITIES 

GEMINI/EPSON (Derby City) (T/D) $13.95 

The LOWEST priced GEMINI/EPSON screen dump for 
the CoCo ANYWHERE! But has all the advanced options 
of the higher priced programs! Super fast ML compiled 
from Basic, Very user friendly - Menu driven. Also com- 
patible with GRAPHICOM & BJORK BLOCKS. Any baud 
rate - Standard & Reverse Images - Full or Quarter page 
pictures - High Speed Poke option - Nice Buy! 

PP-115 COLOR DUMP (Derby City) (T/D) $21.95 

The FASTEST and HIGHEST QUALITY CGP-115 P/P 
screen dump. Completely menu driven - Works in ALL 
PMODES and compatible with GRAPHICOM. Will dump 
any image on any one of the graphics pages! Reverse 
PMODEs 4 and 2 and images. Exchange any color for 
another color in PMODEs 1 or 3! Print out largest possible 
picture. Delete background option. Review Feb. '84. 



SPEECH - MUSIC - GAMES 

SPECTRUM VOICE PAK (CoCo III) $67.95/577.95 

The VOICE PAK is a simple to use, complete phoneme 
based voice system, that employs the 'VOTRAX SCOT 
speech synthesizer chip. It provides for unlimited vocab- 
ulary! Automatic or user supplied inflection! Plus four 
programmable levels of pitch! Comes with Word Manager 
that constructs and edits custom user dictionaries & a 
text to screen scanner translator that can be used either 
interactively or under the users program control! With a 
single line of Basic code, the VOICE PAK will add speech 
to any of your Basic programs! RAINBOW review 
Nov, '84. 

TERM TALK (Spectrum) (T/D) $37.95/347.95 

The COMPLETE talking terminal program. In addition to 
printing incoming & outgoing text on the screen it is cap- 
able of speaking the text! An ASCII based communication 
program that features: Download programs & text files. 
Save & load buffers to tape or disk, split or full screen, 
normal or reverse display. Fill buffer before togging on, 
re-define any communication protocols. Reviewed in 
March, 1984. 

CO€OBINGO (Spectrum) (Tape) $24.95 

The same as the popular game of BINGO but this one 
will talk! Comes with: 20 Bingo player cards & 200 mar- 
kers plus complete documentation on rules. Also includes 

3 timing levels of play, ball count and a pause control. 
Compatible with disk. N 32. B 2. 

FINAL COUNTDOWN (Spectrum) $24.95 

A beserk General has started the FINAL COUNTDOWN!! 
He has aimed the missile at MOSCOW! Your mission is 
to stop the launch and prevent the impending World War 
III. Has multiple voices for added realism!!! 

MUSICA (2 Spectrum) $39.95 

4 voices simultaneously - Play music easily from a Basic 
program - Block copy music - No hardware and 100% 
machine language - Easy vibrato effect - High resolution 
display - Output sheet music to printer and input from 
keyboard or joystick - 30 page book describing how to: 
Exchange a waveshape between any voice, at any point 
- Control the loudness of each voice individually - and 
much - much more! Try It! 

COLOR BIORHYTHM (Derby City) (T/D) $12.95 

FortheCGP-1 15 Printer/Plotter. Find your Highs & Lows! 
Full 4 color printout that features: A years complete 
analysis/printout & one month/page. Fully color coded for 
easy understanding - Every months analysis contains a 
complete sine wave chart and a full, color coded, break- 
down of the daily codes. 

PENTAY (Derby City) (T'D) $19.95 

The same classic game of skill, published by PENTE 
GAMES, INC. and Co-Authored by Gary Gabrel and Tom 
Braunlich. Play a basic two player game or try the more 
advanced tournament rules. The program is not protected 
in any way and is in straight EXT. BASIC code. The 
reason for this is because you may want to modifiy the 
code to add features or enhancments like many of the 
users, that I have heard from in the past few months, the 
ones that want to find out how it is done. Don't be fooled 
though! PENTAY is a game that is a Hi-res, 4 color, 
graphics program - with graphic text and speed that can 
& will more than surprise you! (Let me know if it helps.) 

BLACKJACK ROYAL (Spectrum) (T/D) $24.95 

A Hi-Res graphics, casino blackjack simulation and card 
counting tutor. Includes: Double down, splits surrender, 
insurance bets, 1-8 decks, burnt cards, shuffle frequency 
and more! Reviewed August 1983". 



DERBY CITY SOFTWARE - SPECTRUM PROJECTS SOUTH 

3825 Bardstown Road, Suite 232, Louisville, KY 40218 
(502) 454-6809 

All orders add S3 00 shipping and handling KY residents add 5°o sales tax 
C O.D.. VISA MasterCard or Cash 



3* 



SCHOOL IS IN THE HEART OF A CHILD 



4K 



RA 


the I 

mmm 


INBOW 


J- 


-I- 



E 



Wandering Star 
Learns To PEEK 



/ know it is in my heart. It reaches out 
to my mind. It speaks to my soul. Yet, 
I see it only dimly — a key to the future. 
A child approaches and touches it. She 
laughs and claps her hands. I see, because 
she has made it clear. 

— Laran Stardrake 



By Bob Albrecht and Ramon Zamora 
Rainbow Contributing Editors 







vvi ust, vuni^uiua us t\ juyiLii liiiuny ca.|jci icinc, hc MJggCsl W*i\\S it) --USc ttlt, 

home co m pute r as an ot h e r means t o en co u r age yo u r c h i 1 d 's ind e pend e n ce ,. growth 
and control over his o w n life . See the pride on her. face as she d i rects \h e 
computer to do what she selects with deliberation. See her head gears. switch., 
to "on" as she progresses step by step with your presence and caring guidance. 
We \vill explore (we hope, with your help) the following: 



• Specific _"teachtii^''techniques sn the discoverycan. be the. child's, own. 

• ■■eriticaj evaluation of software based on extensive, play testing in family and 

related environments. 

• Add ilional reso urces to eonsu It: book s, _ magazines , software pub lisliers, . 
■■■■ ■ networks, etc- 

• Suggestions fbrinterludes and fun times away fi win ihe computer (a must!): 

call . the librarian for infoi inal io u ; watch TV i oget her and discuss it; work 
together aa volunteers in a. community project; take an "awareness" walk 

; • Whatever we team from families we work with in Menlo Park or from you, 
...... o.u r read ers .. I ;et 's poo I. .u'ii f. k n o wledge a hd share . o u r ex per ienees as we lea rn 

fmm.oiir children. . 



.Copyright I9&5 byDragonQuest, P.O. Box 7627, Menlo Park, -CA-WG26,-- 



(Well-known author Bob Albrecht co-authors the 
"Game Master s Apprentice "feature for THE rain bo w 
each month. Ramon Zamora is author and co-author 
of several books, co-founder of Computer Town 
USA!, and currently designing computer games for 
kids at Child Ware Corp. in Menlo Park, Calif) 



Wandering Star, as regular readers know, is a 
hungry creature who subsists on cosmic dust 
motes. Your CoCo's TV screen is her universe. 
Wandering Star sometimes moves next to a cosmic dust 
mote, then moves away. Let's teach her how to "peek" 
at nearby places to see if any cosmic dust is there. If there 
is, she will move directly to it instead of wandering 
randomly — a much more efficient way to gather food. 

Remember, print positions on the screen are numbered 
from zero (upper left corner) to 511 (lower right corner). 
For each screen position, there is a corresponding location 
in the CoCo's memory. These memory locations are 
numbered from 1024 to 1535. 

— Memory location 1024 corresponds to screen position 
zero 

— Memory location 1025 corresponds to screen position 
one 

— And so on. Memory location 1535 corresponds to 
screen position 511 

You can easily compute the memory location that 
corresponds to a given screen position. 

memory location - screen position + 1024 

You can also easily compute the screen position that 
corresponds to a given memory location, provided the 
memory location is in the range 1024 to 1535. 

screen position = memory location - 1024 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 229 



For each character on the screen, the CoCo keeps the 
character's ASCII code in the memory location that 
corresponds to the screen position of the character. 

— The code for short-tailed cosmic dust (.) is 46 

— The code for long-tailed cosmic dust (,) is 39 

— The code for cosmic escargot (@) is 64 

If screen position 235 contains a short-tailed dust mote 
(.), then memory location 1259 contains the number 46. 
If screen position 400 contains a long-tailed dust mote (,), 
then memory location 1424 contains the number 39. 
Suppose screen position 510 contains one cosmic escargot 
(@). The corresponding memory location is 510 + 1024 
= 1534. Location 1534 contains the number 64, which is 
the ASCII code for 4 @.' 

Now learn how to PEEK into a memory location and 
find out what number is there. 

— Press the clear key 

— Type PRINT PEEK (1024) and press ENTER 

Don't abbreviate PRINT with a question mark — type 
the word PRINT. The screen should look like this. 



PRINT PEEK (1024) 

80 
Di< 
■ PEEK into memory location 1024 



You told the CoCo to PEEK into memory location 1024 
and PRINT the number stored there. Remember, memory 
location 1024 corresponds to screen position zero. The letter 
'P' is in screen position zero. The ASCII code for 'P' is 
80, so the CoCo printed 80. Try another. 

Press the CLEAR key 
— Type PRINT PEEK (1535) and press ENTER 

The screen looks like this. 



PRINT PEEK (1535) 

96 
OK 



PEEK into memory 
location 1535 



This time you PEEKed into memory location 1535 which 
corresponds to screen position 511. That screen location 
is solid green, so we thought the CoCo would print 143, 
the ASCII code for the solid green graphics character. Not 
so! If you clear the screen by pressing the clear key (or 
by typing CLS), the CoCo puts the code 96 in every memory 
location that corresponds to a screen position. Try this. 

— Type CL5 1 and press ENTER 

— Type PRINT PEEK (1535) and press ENTER 
The screen looks like this. 



OK 

PRINT PEEK (1535) 
143 

Dl< 



When you use CL5 1 to clear the screen, the computer 
puts 143 into memory lcoations 1024 to 1535. Hmm . . . 
what if you use CL5 0, CLS 2, CLS 3, CLS 4, CLS 5, CLS 
6, CLS 7 or CLS 8? Try it and find out. Then try one 
more example. 

— Press the clear key 

— Type PRINT @80, "@" and press enter 

— Type PRINT PEEK (1104) and press ENTER 

The screen looks like this. 



PRINT @80, "@" 









OK 




PRINT PEEK (1104) 




64 




OK 
■ 


Cosmic escargot at 
screen position 80 



You cleared the screen, put a byte of cosmic escargot 
at screen position 80, then PEEKed into the memory location 
corresponding to screen position 80: memory location = 
80 + 1024 + 1 104. Just what you expected — 1 104 contains 
the ASCII code (46) for a byte of cosmic escargot (@). 
Go gobble it up, Wandering Star! 

Now we will give Wandering Star a program that lets 
her peek one place right, left, down or up to see if there 
is anything to eat nearby. 



Nothing to the right. 

Nothing to the left. 

Aha! Cosmic escargot one place down. 



@ 



;^&is^ 




470 . , . 247 
. v; ,147 



i 



-;.:.■' . 



200 






21 0:v. ' MENU* ■*■:.:. '.*::•■■.». ■:.« .■:■ i i |i ■■■■■:..'. 




240 t 60* * HID* (MENilt^eDvi) 



230 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 




WLS NEST 



SOFTWARE 

' WE GIVE A HOOT ' 



TWO NEW PROGRAMS DESIGNED FOR THE 64K COLOR COMPUTER ' 

LABEL64 - LABEL64 is a name arid address file/print 
system that takes advantage of your 64K. You can deve- 
lop and maintain a mailing list. Print lists or mail- 
ing labels in your choice of 1, 2, or 3 wide. Sup- 
ports 3 or 4 line addresses with phone optional. You 
can sort by last name, first name, and/or zip code. 
You can work with up to 300 records in memory at a time. 
We include a second copy for back up at no additional 
charge. Take advantage of your 64K with LABEL64. 
Cassette - 64K EXT Postpaid $24.95 

FILE64 - FILE64 is a data management system designed 
to take advantage of a 64K machine. You can create 
and maintain records on anything you choose. Recipes, 
coupons, household records, financial records - you 
name it. You create records containing up to five 
fields you define. You can search, sort, modify, add, 
delete, save on tape, display on the screen and print 
on a printer. The program could cost you much more 
and we include a back up copy at no additional charge. 
Cassette - 64K EXT Postpaid $24.95 

SAVE $$ Take both our LABEL64 and FILE64 for only 
$40.00 Postpaid. Don't miss this special offer J 

N0TE1 If you already have our LABELIII or FILEIII 
program we will upgrade you to the 64K version for 
only $10.00. Upgrade both for only $15.00. It is 
not necessary to return your old programs. Simply 
send your invoice number with your request. 

ALCATRAZ ADVENTURE 8ur newest and we think most in- 
volved adventure. You have been unjustly imprisioned 
and sentenced to death. You must escape to prove 
your innocence. You will face many unique problems 
as you work on your goal. If you liked our BASHAN 
adventure you will love ALCATRAZ. Your adventure 
contains a large vocabulary and some unique. features. 
This is a tough one recommended for advanced players. 
32K EXT Postpaid Disk $20.95 Cassette $17.95 

CUBE ADVENTURE - Cube is a non violent adventure for 
a minimum 16K EXT system. You must lobate and enter 
the "CUBE" gathering treasures along the way. You 
will encounter some unique problems as you work on 
your goal, CUBE is an intermediate to hard adven- 
ture suitable for everyone, 
16K EXT postpaid Disk $20.95 Cassette $17.95 



GOOD NEWS FOR OUR FRIENDS FROM DOWN UNDER I 
We are pleased to announce that our customers in Aus- 
trailia can now purchase our programs from our Austra- 
lian distributor. This will avoid long shipping 
delays. Remit in Australian Dollars to COMPUTER HUT 
SOFTWARE 21 WILLIAMS St. B0WEN OLD. 4805 Phone (077) 
862220 

GOOD NEWS FOR OUR FRIENDS FROM UP NORTH! 
Now our friends from Canada can purchase our programs 
direct from our Canadian distributor. Remit in 
Canadian dollars to KELLY SOFTWARE DIST. LTD. 
P.O. Box 11932 EDMONTON, ALBERTA T5J 3L1 (403) 
421-8003 



NOW LABELIII IS AVAILABLE ON DISK! 

LABELIII * (Reviewed in Nov 83 Rainbow) With LABELIII 
you can develop and Maintain a mailing liat. Print liata 
or mailing labels in your choice of 1, 2, or 3 wide. 
Supports 3 or 4 line addresses with phone optional. 
Sort by last name, firat name or zip code. 
16K EXT Postpaid Disk $21.95 Cassette $19.95 

FILEIII - Data management aystem. With FILEIII you 
can create and maintain records on anything you choose. 
Recipes, coupons, household records, financial records - 
you name it. You create records containing up to five 
fields that you define. You can search, sort, add, 
delete, modify, display on the acreen or send to a 
printer. The program is uaer friendly and user proof. 
Prompting ia extensive. A comparable program could 
cost you much more. This one is a bargain! 
Cassette - 16K EXT Postpaid $19.95 

PROGRAM FILE - (rev Oct 83 Rainbow) Organize your 
programs. With PROGRAM FILE you create a file of your 
computer programs." You can search, sort, add, modify, 
delete, ssve to tape and display on the acreen or 
send to a printer. 
Cassette 16K EXT Postpaid $14.95 

DATA MANAGEMENT PACKAGE - Save $$ Take the three above 
programs on three cassettes for only $40.00 Postpaid 

ESPIONAGE ISLAND ADVENTURE - (reviewed in June 84 Rain- 
bow) You have been dropped off on an island by submarine., 
You must recover a top secret microfilm and signal the 
sub to pick you up. Problems abound in this 32K EXT 
adventure . 
32K EXT Postpaid Disk $20.95 Cassette $17.95 

FOUR MILE ISLAND - You are trapped in a disabled nuclear 
power plant. The reactor is running away. You must 
bring the reactor to a cold shutdown and prevent the 
"China Syndrome". Can you aave the plant (and your- 
self)? It's not easy! 
16K EXT Postpaid Disk $20.95 Cassette $17.95 

KINGDOM OF BASHAN - Our flagship adventure. Baehan has 
a very large vocabulary and some unique features. You 
must enter BASHAN (not easy), gather the ten treasures 
of the ancient kingdom (even harder) and return to the 
atarting point (harder yet). If you can ecore the 
maximum 200 points in BASHAN you are an expert! 
32K EXT Postpaid Diek $20.95 Caee£ , e $17.95 

ADVENTURE COMBO Save $$ The three above adventureB on 
three cassettes or one disk (specify) postpaid for only 
$40.00 

ATLANTIS ADVENTURE - This one iB not easy - in fact 
we challenge you to complete it in 30 days. If you do 
we will send you any program we sell - poatpaid - at 
absolutely no charge. You start on a disabled sub 
near the lost city of Atlantis. You mu8t get the 3ub 
(and yourself) safely to the surface. Do you think 
Atlantians are friendly? 
Postpaid 32K EXT Disk $24.95 16K EXT Cassette $21.95 

ADVENTURE STARTER - Learn to play those adventures the 

painless way. You start with an easy adventure and 

move to an intermediate. Two complete separate non 

violent adventures plus hints and tips on adventuring 

in general. FiniBh this and you will be ready for 

ATLANTIS! 

Cassette - 16K EXT Postpaid $17.95 



!PP 



VISA* 



C.O.D. orders please add 1 .50 
No Delay For Personal Checks 
In a Hurry? Call (615) 238-9458 

OWLS NEST SOFTWARE 
P O BOX 579 

OOLTEWAH. TN 37363 



wioffsfwara 



MORETON BAY 



MORE KEYS 

At last a quality numeric keypad for your Color 
Computer. This 15 key numeric pad plugs inside your 
computer and gives you the convenience of rapid 
numeric data entry. Dimensions: length 6V2" 
(165mm), width 4" (101 mm), height 3" (76 mm). 
Baked black enamel finish. Specify computer model. 
MORE KEYS complete with cable and connector. 
$69.95 




RESET-POWER-SWITCHES 

A REAL IMPROVEMENT 

Move the power switch and reset switch where they 
belong. An LED power on light too! High quality 
parts. D, E boards and C0C0 2 totally solderless kit. 
F board requires soldering. 



Reset 1 C0C0 1 $24.95 
Reset 2 C0C0 2 $27.95 




Either kit add $2.00 shipping and handling 



DOUBLE DRIVER 

The BEST monitor driver 
available. Color composite, 
monochrome and audio out- 
put. For original C0C0 D, E 
and F boards. $24.95. 



Mono II for Color Computer 
2. An excellent monochrome 
monitor driver that has 
audio output also. $24.95. Specify model needed. 




MINI MOUTH 

Add sound to your mute 
monitor. Hear the bells and 
whistles of your software 
again. No batteries. 
Solderless installation. 
All Color Computer Models 
$24.95 



,:,# l; "j 







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Guaranteed Pretested 



64K UPGRADES 

Instantly access 64K via M/L 
totally solderless kit to 
upgrade E Boards. Kit in- 
cludes eight 4164 prime chips 
and chips U29 and Ull 
already soldered. 
SPECIAL: E Board Kit 
$39.95, F Board and Color 
Computer 2 $26.95. 



THE COCO-SWITCHER 

A QUALITY PIECE OF HARDWARE 

The C0C0 Switcher allows you to hook up three 
peripherals to your RS-232 jack. Connect your 
modem, printer and any other RS-232 compatible 
peripheral to the C0C0 Switcher. An LED on the 
C0C0 Switcher shows if your computer is on or off 
at a glance. The LED flickers when transmitting or 
receiving data. 

Dimensions: 2V2" (64 mm) x 4" (102 mm) 

x 5 7/8' (150 mm) 
$39.95 plus $2.00 shipping and handling 




TRIVIA AND SOME SIGNIFICA 

NOW MORE THAN 2000 QUESTIONS! 

Humorous, educational, nostalgic and tricky. The 
game even has a mathematics and computers 
category: Good family and party enLertainment. 
Included is a utility so you can create your own trivia 
questions. 

16K EXB Cassettes $21.95 
32K Disk $24.95 



CLOSE OUT SPECIAL 

Get 4 educational math programs for grades K-6. 
16KEXB Cassette $15.95 

Get 2 game cassettes 
32 K EXB Cassette $12.95 



Having trouble with your C0C0? We have the chips you 
need. Call us. (805) 962-3127 






^ 55ii 3 dVsgg 






SOFTWARE 



SAM DIAMOND, P.I. 

The first of our new Sam Diamond graphic adven- 
tures. More than 40 detailed high resolution graphic 
scenes. A killer is loose in the city. Can you bring 
him to justice before he gets you? Excellent graphics 
and a tough mystery to solve. 

32K Disk Only $29.95 
plus $2.00 shipping and handling 




GET THE MOST FROM YOUR GRAPHIC PROGRAMS 

How to integrate Graphicom and CoCoMax. Two tutorial 

disks full of examples and suggestions. See how to create 

graphics step by step. Learn how to display and even 

animate your graphics from Basic. 

1 Disk $14.95 

2 Disks $24.95 







ing ^he Pile us ing Graphicon . 



WHEELS 



THE VERY BEST IN GRAPHICS 



PLACES AND FACES 



BJORK BLOCKS 

An incredible graphic utility. Fun. Easy. Create graphic 
screens as good as any you have seen. All you need is a 
joystick or mouse. "The most user friendly program I have 
ever seen for the CoCo. For those of you with graphic 
interests, I guarantee that you will not be disappointed." 
Review in Rainbow, Oct. 1984. 



Requires 32K EXB 
(64K for animation) 
Tape or Disk $34.95 
BUILDING BLOCKS 
(Picture Disk) $15,95 




-^-afi? 






GRAPHICOM 

Buy Graphicom from us and get one of our unique picture 
disks free! Get our improved Picture Disk One also. The 
first in the new generation of graphic utilities. An excellent 
utility. Requires: 64K EXB, Disk Drive and Joy Sticks. Three 
disks and the best bound documentation for only $29.95. 

Calligraphy STAMP DISK: Useful letters and designs for 
making your own signs and menu screens. 

Adventure Disk I: Indoor scenes and objects. Helps you 
draw pictures and learn more about Graphicom. 
Adventure Disk II: Outdoor scenes and objects. A 
Graphicom tutorial as well as a useful library of images you 
can use. 



JDia 



slj-oa 



Created with Bjork Blocks 
SPECIAL: BJORK BLOCKS and GRAPHICOM $55.0CU ^?« « ar«*l 

MORETON BAY SOFTWARE 



A Division of Moreton Bay Laboratory 

316 CASTILLO STREET 

SANTA BARBARA, 

CALIFORNIA 93101 

(805) 962-3127 




l£§LLffiM»ffiSlf IDE 

Calligraphy Disk II: 23 

New letter stamp sets 




finnr,,, i 
iSHnnrlii 

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Ordering information 
Add $2.00 shipping and handling per order. We ship within 24 hours on 
receipt of order. Blue Label Service available. California residents add 6% 
sales tax. 



.rJlllllll 






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Adventure Disk II 



() Adventure Disk 1 

1 Picture Disk $15.95 

2 Picture Disks $24.95 

3 Picture Disks $29.95 

4 Picture Disks $34.95 



250 i PRINT @RND (510) v GD*j 



■-# ■■ 



300 REM#*WANDER I NG STAR APPEARS 

SlBiillB^ ■.:.' 

330 C ■ 16s CN * C ^ 
340 SP * 32*RN + CN 
350 PRINT SSP, WS*j 

ZZ*1 TO 1000: NEXT ZZ 




PEEKS R» tr D, U 

IF C< 31 THEN PR-PEEK (ML+1) 
IF C>0 THEN PL-PEEK (ML- 1) 
IF R< 15 THEN PD-PEEK(ML+32> 
IF R>0 THEN PU-PEEK(ML-32) 
IF PR<>96 THEN CN-D+is GOTO 

IF PL<>96 THEN CN-C-1: BOTQ 

#80 IF PD096 THEN RN-R+ls SOTO 

490 IF PU096 THEN RN-R-l: SOTO 



TELE-FORM 

THE SMART TEXT FORMATTER 
FOR TELEWRITER-64® 



^<*L<* 



• Tele-form turns Telewriter into a powerful mail-merge with simple 
embedded codes. Simply type in a letter, then follow it with your 
list of names. A 64K machine holds one page of text with a 500 
name list. 

• Tele-form includes an embedded code that stops printer output, 
then waits for you to type information into that location in the text; 
a form letter code. 

• Loads into Telewriter's BASIC buffer without touching any Tele- 
writer code. Works interactively to pass parameters back and 
forth between Telewriter, and easily returns to Telewriter. 

• Tele-form can do all formatting, even mail-merge and form letters, 
in memory. You can immediately see all margins, headers, page 
numbers, etc., on Telewriter's screen. 

TAPE $24.95 DISK $29.95 
* Send Check or Money Order Today To: 
CIGNACO. 115BELMONTST. ROCHESTER, NY 14620 
716-442-3705 

Telewriter is a trademark of Cognitec. 




RANDOMLY 

IF W«l THEN CN « C + 1 

530 IF W*2 THEN CN m C - 1 
«« ■■■*-■■ . ^ ww ^- RN m: . R + t 




600 REM**KEEP HER IN THE DAS I E 



" - 31 



M 



THEN RN » 
W » 15 
IF 32*RN+CN«511 THEN 510 



STAR WANDERS 




750 FOR ZZ=* 1 TO 20r NEXT ZZ 

REH#*8aT0 DIRECTION SELECTOR 



Perhaps You Have Some Patterns in Mind 

Perhaps you have a plan in mind — a pattern of patterns 
or a sequence of sequences. You would like your student, 
child or friend to experience first this pattern, then another 
and another. You have a plan which begins with easy 
patterns, then slightly more difficult, then more difficult, 
etc. It is your plan, do it your way. 

Instead of letting the CoCo select random number 
patterns, you can prescribe a sequence of patterns. The 
following program allows you to do this. Ail you have 
to do is rewrite the DflTR statements, so your plan replaces 
ours. 



^o^-u^ 6 y-roi".: 1 ^" ".-:-■-■■-." '-J ^V-V^ : : : ^:& ^»:'V:::tC-V:--: ! =:'"=: ■-; i"::"-. V.""^: 1 ^ H " '-"i-^ : : -, o; W""-" " !-'!:h ■ .:■. ^-/- ..:!.■>- &T?T;:7rrjr-~f:-T-'-:;:|--=-:"/ ■- TV.".: c :-^-=:.;7._.-!i]. : . ? : : : .-.,..-il,| H |J !-. !- r -: ■':-■.-:":!; "'-■"-■ o J'.": 1 !-"!i™! : =. ...-V 


Listing 2: PATTERNS 


100 REM**NMBR PATTERNS SCH 14-2 


110 CLS •' 


120 PRINT "TRY SOME NUMBER PATTE 


RNS."i PRINT 


130 PRINT "PRESS THE spacebar TO 


BEGIN." " 


140 IF INKEY*«" M THEN 140 


199 ■■■ ■ ■"■'■ 


200 REM*«READ STARTING NUMBERS 


ilifelii^si^^g^ig^^^^i^si 


220 READ S, A 


230 IF S - 1E37 THEN PRINT " I 'M 


OUT OF PATTERNS" 8 END 


299 ':. '■■■ 


300 REM#*SHOW ' LATEST ' NUMBER 


310 PRINT €448, S 


320 PRINT 


399 ■'■*■ '." 


400 REM*»COMPUTE NEXT NUMBER 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^■""■'- 



234 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 





f^MH 


500 REM##WHAT TO DQ NEXT 


'^,-; ■ ;■■■■;;■ '■'■'.■;■; 


510 PRINT 6480, "FOR NEXT NUMBER 


, PRESS spacebar " 




520 PRINT "FOR NEW PATTERN, 


ISBllI 


S clear"} 


: ^:^:|I:K^'%^S 


530 K**TNKEY*s IF K** " " THEN 


SSNBfei#'3 


540 IF K*«" "THEN 310 


'^QiSe^Uo^^ 


550 IF K*=CHR* (12 ) THEN 1 10 


^■^B^^M^^ 


ELSE 530 "T 




*"^' ; iBW*T*«t'iiiL'!^'- ' ■■'- *' ■^■■:■:■: , ■.■.■ , ■ ■ " ^' '^.;.'j ■■;■■■;■■- ;^ - -V. ' ^.^-^v.^.- ' jo....;. ;.;■..■.., ,^ ■ ;o ....;. ........ -, .; . .....-.?....■..■. , r ^ ^,0.....^.., -,-,■ ;.o;. :v .; ..v,, ,,,;.; 

■f:^ , 'W™;T-' , -"^^ ::, - : -'''''; :,, - :; ' , -:;'' :v: " , '-'-'\: ■"■■■:■ -:"'-' L - : ^ 




900 REH**VALUES OF S AND A 




910 DATA 1 , 1 , 1 , 2 , 2^2 , 2 , 3 


|||SSftg 


Tjtlu Unln U) 1 f Of 2f 3f5f 7j9j 


1E3 


^^$^^ 


SlftlPIS 



For each pattern, the two starting numbers, 'S' and 'A,' 
are stored in a DPTfi statement. These numbers are read 
by Line 220. The DATA statements are in lines 910 and 
920. 

S A S A S A . . . and so on 

n it ti 

910 DATA 1,1, 1,2, 2,2, 2,3 

/ / \ -N 

, 1st pattern 2nd pattern 3rd pattern 4th pattern 



920 DATA 0, 1 , 0, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 1 E37, 1 E37 

/ / \ \ NN 

5th pattern 6th pattern 7th pattern 8th pattern FLAGS 



The DRTfi statements have values of 'S' and 'A' for eight 
patterns, followed by two outrageous numbers, 1E37 and 
1E37. These numbers are the flags which say: "There are 
no more numbers. We are not pattern numbers. We are 
here only to tell the computer there are no more numbers." 

Why two flags? Because the READ statement (Line 220) 
reads two values. There must be two values, or an OD 
(Out of Data) Error message will occur when the CoCo 
tries to read two numbers in Line 220. The second flag 
is not used, but must be there. 

With the above program, you can plan your sequence 
of sequences, or pattern of patterns. You pick each FIRST 
NUMBER and you pick each ADD-ON number. You pick 
each pair of numbers in the DATA statements. Use as many 
pairs as you want, then finish with two flags, 1E37 and 
1E37. If you don't like our flags, use use your own. But, 
if you change the flags, also change Line 230 in the program. 
Please don't confuse the computer. 

If you want geometric sequences instead of arithmetic, 
change Line 410 as follows: 

410 5 = S*A 

Try the program, using our DATA statements. It begins 
like this. 



TRY SOME NUMBER PATT ERNS. 
PRESS THE lSPACElARl TD BEGIN 

\ 

This is in reverse color 



Press the space bar and the first pattern begins. 



FDR NEXT NUMBER, PRESS [SPACE BAR| 
FDR NEW PATTERN, PRESS |CLEAR] KEY 



Reverse color 



Reverse color 



To continue with this pattern, keep pressing the space 
bar. To get the next pattern, press the CLEAR key. If all 
the starting numbers have been used, you will see the 
following message. 



I'M OUT DF PATTERNS 

OK -> 



Do you want geometric sequences instead of arithmetic 
sequences? If yes, change Line 410 as follows: 

410 5 = 5*A 

DragonSmoke 

DragonSmoke is our monthly newsletter about new ways 
to learn, including computers, role playing games, play- 
by-mail games, COPY ME stuff, public domain instructional 
materials, software for beginners, and our own play-by- 
mail game, DragonFun. 

DragonFun is a play-by-mail role playing game for 
beginners. It is nonviolent and features cooperation, 
exploration, problem-solving and story-telling. How to play 
is described in : the February 1985 issue of DragonSmoke. 
For a free copy, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope 
to DragonSmoke, P.O. Box 7627, Mcnlo Park, CA 94026. 









October 18-20 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 235 



GREAT COCO PRODUCTS 



■■***"&&, thrnm on* wiH take c^ of *hb$e^«eoVqy^*^^^^ Ifittt 

te s<jrve*te ^ 

>\ ..we#.w^ 

writer orders, print shipping papers and Invoices, prepare sates reports, and monitor 



t iTfcipvSr: wiiif Software equate orsxcesds big&rpric^d p^Jca^sior 6t{^ c^p^teW; 1 
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operating manual. ONLY $99.95 



*&** x EASY EDIT 



Easy-Edit is a versatile, easy to use text editor which is particularly convenient for assembly 
language and BASIC programming. This editor offers powerful text handling capabilities 
along with many special features including a built-in disc operating system, 32/64K memory 
sense, a 51 character by 24 line screen, auto key repeat, extensive error reporting, and 
complete compatibility with popular assemblers. Requires 32K and at least L one_djsc drive. 
Master disc and instructions are packaged in an attractive 3-ring binder. $34.95 



^^^^™*-«wi-i 




^ ♦Original key fey 

• fast, easy imtattatton— no sdfcfe 



w *k*,ir \ 1 5t^th;ToucH typist^ feel— n<y sagging ; \ 

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'*?^:. * Professional, tow prof tie, finished appearance 



■•■•.•■'•■• -•.-•■■••• ^-.- 



SUPER BUG 




Mark Data Products' SUPER BUG is a powerful, relocatable machine code monitor program 
for your CoCo. If you area beginner, the program and documentation are an indispensable 
training aid. If you are an accomplished computerist, SUPER BUG's capabilities, versatility 
and convenience will prove invaluable during programming and debugging. Many 
outstanding features, including hex and alpha numeric memory display, modify,search and 
test; full printer support with baud rate and line feed select; up to 220 breakpoints; mint 
object code disassembler; 64K mode setup; decimal, hex and ascii code conversion 
routines and extensive documentation. Cassette $29.95 Disc $32.95 



_ 



Igi 

:/•■ .?:..C ■: 

■■■:;:,.; 



\ 



EASY-FILE 

uat^ Management System 

f CikCo, m, *& <Tve e*a^oecf fwt ^b^jpir^ms /brtne (&Co to (thh test few 
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: 3 :■'.■ :tSfe#d*a-goodmamr»g ik- or customer Ust program? tiow about a program io.keep trade of .'•.'; 
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COCO DISC DRIVES 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS INCLUDE: 

• Hi-Quality Teac Thin Line Drives 

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• Radio Shack or J & M Controller 

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• Full 90 Day Warranty 

Single Drive (SSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller . . . 

Additional Drive 

Two Drives (SSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller 

Single Drive (DSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller . . . 

Additional Drive 

Two Drives (DSDD) in Dual Cabinet w/Controller 

Dual Cabinet/Power Supply 

Disc Controller (Radio Shack or J & M) 

Connecting Cable 

Radio Shack DOS ROM 1.1 




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_____ 

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ROMS 



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BITS AND BYTES OF BASIC 



Spreadsheet Application 
For Home Economics: 
Buying A Car 



By Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



What's buying a car got to do 
with spreadsheets or other 
computer programming? A 
lot if you use the spreadsheet in the 
process. I just went through that 
process. I knew pretty much what I 
wanted, so I didn't do many "what if" 
projections. If you feel like looking at 
a variety of makes and models, more 
spreadsheet use could be involved. 

You can really get organized easily 
using a spreadsheet. And when you are 
organized, you can be on the offense 
with the dealer who is on the defense. 
Let's start the story. 

First, I got $500 "free money" toward 
a new car. Some may remember when 
Chrysler announced record earnings in 
January, they also announced that all 
employees and all customers who had 
purchased a new Chrysler product 
between 1979 and 1984 would get a 
certificate worth $500 on a new 1985 
car. 

One must address these situations 
with great care. After all, my 72 station 

(Richard White has a long background 
with microcomputers and specializes in 
BASIC programming. With Don Doll- 
berg, he is the author of the TIMS 
database management program.) 



Example! 



A 



It- B ■■][. C ] 
LIST COST 



^llBiiIiiiliiiili^5' : v^GON -- 

SlSiiili! 



7063 



5-FREIGHT AND DEALER CHARGE 



536 



536 



7-H4 BENCH SEAT VINYL 



8-AAB POPULAR EQUIPMENT PKG 

9- \teW TIRES 

10- LIGHT PKG 

L 11- AM/ FH STEREO 

lllilllfl 



31 



."26 



516 



439 



: PWR STEERING 



5iii8|B^|EE v MIRROR-: 



'^^^^^^^^^fSJSS-- 



15-SDB HVY DTY SUSPENSION 
I6-MCC BUMPER GUARDS 
17-GFA REAR WINDOW DEFROST 
13-MWA LUGGAGE RACK 
19-lIAA AIR CONDITIONER 
20-TJA TIRE UPGRADE TO 
21-XPB UNDERCOATING 



58 



43 



56 



36 
43 



626 



31 



22-NHM AUTO SPEED CONTROL 



37 



179 



152 



TOTAL 



10390: 



238 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 




BUT...CHECKERBOARDS 
ARE FOR TABLECLOTHS! 



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Cartridge Scripsit looks beautiful with a 
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Pull the checkerboard tablecloth off 
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TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corporation 



wagon was still getting from gas station 
to gas station and my '80 Horizon is 
still new by comparison. 

I reflected for a couple of weeks. The 
station wagon was aging, rusting and 
pieces were falling off. Signals of middle 
age perhaps. But, a Tandy 1000 seemed 
a bit neater than a new car and is 
unlikely to rust. On the other hand, 
computers aren't mobile. It seemed a 
brief fact-finding trip to the local Dodge 
dealer would be in order for a new car 
consideration. 

The dealer was out of station wagons 
and had only one car that cost more 
than four IBM PCs with a printer 
thrown in. I did get literature and 
stopped at a newsstand on the way 
home to buy a book containing both 
suggested retail and dealer costs for new 
cars and their options. Now I could 
rationally evaluate the situation from 
the safety of my easy chair with my 
wallet secured between me and the 
upholstery. 

On the way home the next evening, 
I stopped at a Plymouth dealer who 
had no new wagons, either. He could 
sell me an '84 demonstrator where my 
Iacocca Certificate did not apply, and 
which did not benefit from the free 
automatic transmission promotion. I 
had the feeling I would pay more for 
that car than a new one ordered to my 
specifications. Time to do a spreadsheet. 

Example 1 is the final spreadsheet for 
the car I ordered and is typical of what 
you might do a number of times as you 



narrow down your choices. All the data 
comes right out of the manufacturer's 
literature and the price book. The only 
formulae, @SUM(B1. . .B23) and 
@SUM(C1. - -C23), are in cells B24 
and C24 which sum the entries in the 
columns of Example 1. 

The formulae cover the entire column 
above the total row including the 
heading and the blank row above the 

"The one number you 
won't be able to exactly 
define without visiting 
the dealer is the freight 
and dealer charge. If 
you do a lot of looking 
and asking, you will 
pick up some examples 
of this and have a ''ball 
park' figure to apply to 
various cars. 



99 



totals. You can insert and delete any 
row within this range and the formulae 
will adjust themselves. This makes 
"what if" testing easy. 

For example, you may have chosen 
three options that are also included in 
the discounted "popular options pack- 
age." Save your current spreadsheet, 
then delete those options and add the 
popular options package. A recalcula- 



tion shows the new totals which you 
can compare with those in the unmod- 
ified spreadsheet. Since the popular 
options package is discounted, you 
might find that $50 more buys $150 
worth of options. 

The one number you won't be able 
to exactly define without visiting the 
dealer is the freight and dealer charge. 
If you do a lot of looking and asking, 
you will pick up some examples of this 
and have a "ball park" figure to apply 
to various cars. 

Those with printers will do well to 
print each sheet they make and take 
these along when they visit the dealers. 
On my next dealer visits, I had done 
some spreadsheets, but did not have 
them along. Having done the spread- 
sheets only the night before, I knew 
from memory what I wanted and the 
costs to the dealer for these. 

Sensing I knew what I wanted, the 
salesperson got a scrap of paper, pencil 
and her price book and set about 
recreating my spreadsheet by hand. 
After minutes of writing, erasing, 
adding and subtracting, we had a list 
number to work from. I was thinking 
about how much easier the same thing 
had gone with DynaCalc. 

The next day, we arrived with the 
Example 1 spreadsheet to finalize the 
order. Again pencils, papers and 
calculators came out as they strived to 
determine the price. The first cut price 
was wrong. They left out the vinyl seats. 
Finally they got it right. I should have 







240 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



made two printouts and given them one 
to check. It would have saved some 
hassle and mistakes. 

Next came the financing. I had 
looked in a few references for the 
formula for calculating monthly pay- 
ments and came up dry when Herb 
Slodounik of Decatur, III, sent me a 
letter with the formula saying it works 
in Elite*Calc, but not in DynaCalc. 

The book formula is P=B((1-(1+(I/ 
12))^-N)/(I/12)). basic, Elite* Calc 
and Multiplan for other computers 
have a hierarchy of operators. In our 
equation, these "languages" would raise 
(1+(I/12)) to the power -N and then 
subtract that value from one. That is 
because raising to a power is above 
subtraction in the hierarchy. VisiCalc- 
type spreadsheets do not have such a 
hierarchy. Therefore, DynaCalc and 
VIP Calc evaluate all math expressions 
on a strictly left to right basis, except 
as modified by parentheses. This is 
extremely important since it is contrary 
to how you would solve equations using 
pencil and paper or how you would 
program the equation in BASIC. 

Example 2 is a formula dump of a 
DynaCalc spreadsheet to calculate 
monthly payments given number of 
payments, amount financed (principal) 
and the interest rate given as a decimal 
number. An interest rate of 12.5 percent 
is entered as .125. These variables are 
entered in cells Bl . . . B3. The formula 
to calculate payments is in B5 and looks 
like this: 



■ . ' ' ■■■■! 




...;■■■■ V .-.**■ ../: ■■■;;. 



The diagram below the equation 
shows the order of calculation and how 
the parentheses group. The innermost 
expression (B3/12) is calculated first. 
(i+Valuel) and (0-B1) are at the same 
level so the left one is calculated first. 

Note that DynaCalc will not accept 
(-B1), but (0-B1) works. The same cell 
construction is used in CI. Other 
spreadsheets are not so fussy. In Step 
4 the raise-to-power operation occurs. 
At this point you should be able to 
reason out steps 5 through 7 for 
yourself. 

To get to the equation in B5, 1 broke 
the book formula into pieces and put 
these into cells CI. . .C5. These produce 
the same answer in C5 as the full 



equation produces in B5. Many times 
it is easier to put work areas like 
CI. . .C5 outside the formal area of the 
spreadsheet and move their results back 
to where that value is to appear in a 
printout. Now the consideration is the 
order of calculation for the whole 
spreadsheet, rather than order of 
calculation for a specific formula. 

A forward reference is where a 
formula in a cell uses a value from 
another cell that has not been calculated 
yet. A typical order is to calculate the 
values in Column A starting at Row 
1, then the spreadsheet moves to 
Column B and does the same thing. This 
would work fine for the top part of our 
spreadsheet. 

The last nine lines of the spreadsheet 
start a series of calculations that 
calculate how much of each payment 
goes to interest and to principal, then 
calculates the outstanding principal 
after each monthly payment. 

In cell B12, the starting principal is 
brought down from cell B2. This value 
is used in cell D12 along with the 
interest rate from B5. The interest 
charged in D 12 is subtracted from the 
monthly payment in cell B5 to get the 
amount available to reduce the principal. 
In cell D13, the starting principal for 
the month is reduced by the value from 
B13. 

This spreadsheet arrangement be- 
comes a disaster when columns are 
calculated from left to right. The 
calculation of the principal payment in 
B13 needs the interest payment from 
D12 which has not been calculated yet. 
The effect snowballs since the start 
principal in B15 needs the value from 
D13 which is not right because B13 is 
not yet right, etc. 

You can manually cause a recalcu- 
lation which will fix B13 and D13, but 
D13 is calculated too late for B15 to 
be right. In fact, two recalculations for 
each month in the spreadsheet would 
be necessary. With DynaCalc, you can 
change the order of calculation so rows 
are done in order down the spreadsheet 
and all our troubles go away. 

Elite*Calc calculates rows down the 
spreadsheet in order from left to right. 
Example 2 is a very worst case situation 
that was not purposely designed to 
exemplify the problem, but which does 
so in spades. 

VIP Calc also permits changing a 
default column-by-column calculation 
order to a row-by-row sequence using 
the Global command. The VIP Calc 
manual also warns against circular 



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June 1985 THE RAINBOW 241 



references that cannot be resolved. A 
trivial example follows: 



t A H : - : B } 

1B1 Al 



Cell Bl contains nothing but the 
formula Al. Cell Al evaluates to zero 
since there is nothing in Bl. Likewise 
Bl equals zero since Al equals zero. 
Here no harm is done or anything useful 
done, but in more complex expressions, 
there is no telling what may happen. 

For those who have hung in there 
up to now, Example 3 is the interest 
payment spreadsheet as you would see 
it without the formula dump. 

I have shown only three months of 
the calculations of monthly principal 
and interest. The formulae for Month 
1 are a bit different than for succeeding 
months. The month number in Bll is 
entered as '1.' The principal in B12 is 
obtained from B2. The month number 
for Month 2, B14, is calculated by 
adding one to the value in Bll. The 
principal in B 1 5 is the amount calculated 
in D13. The same pattern occurs for 
Month 3, B17 adds one to the value 
three cells above. 

The value in B18 is from the cell two 
up and two right. This is describing 
relative cell addresses. How many cells 
away in each direction is the cell from 
which to get a value? 



Another type of cell addressing is 
fixed addressing. The interest rate is in 
B3. Whenever we need the interest rate, 
we always go to that celL Likewise, the 
monthly payment is in B5; we always 
go to that cell for it. 

If we replicate cells with formulae to 
enlarge our spreadsheet so it will 
produce interest and principal for the 
full term of the loan, DynaCalc will 
display the formula in each cell and 
move the cursor to the first cell 
reference and ask (S)ame or (R)elative. 
If we want fixed addressing, we press 
the 'S' for same cell displayed. More 
likely than not we will be dealing with 
relative addressing and strike the 'R.' 

In Example 3, the payment amount 
and interest come from fixed address 
cells and we enter ; S' for them when 
asked. Two data pieces, the last month 
number and the outstanding principal, 
come from the previous month and 
relative addressing is required to get 
them. Finally, the amount of interest 
and the principal payment for the 
particular month are relatively addressed 
within the lines for that month. 

When the replicate is complete, the 
actual cell numbers are shown in the 
equations. DynaCalc used the (S)ame 
or (R)elative information you entered 
to calculate the right cell address to use. 

The Elite*Calc Copy command 
works in a similar manner. I really like 
the way Elite*Calc\ copy works; it can 
deal with blocks rather than only 



^■■■"■■■■^^ 



, %3~j$^^ .125 29.8921 3 

7-TOTAL PAYMENTS 10236.81 
9-INTEREST PAID 1736.809 

. ; ' : :ai;i-month; .■■" ■; ;: ; ■ ■ i 

12-START PRINCIPAL 8500 . 00 INTEREST 88.54 
13-PRINCIPAL PYMT 195 .81 PRINCIPAL 8304. 19 



1&-PRINCIPAL PYMT 

18-START PRINCIPAL 
19-PRINCIPAL PYMT 



85PRINCIPAL 8106.33 

.33 INTEREST 84.44 
.91PRINCIPAL 



7906.42 



columns or cells. You need to tell 
Elite* Cole if you want to adjust some 
of the formulae for relative addressing 
by choosing the Q-QUERY option. It 
then stops at each cell reference to ask 
if you want that cell reference adjusted 
for relative addressing. If you press 
ENTER at the system prompt, OPTIONS 
(V,N,Q), all references are adjusted for 
relative addressing. Press l N' and none 
are. *V copies only the values in the 
cells, but not the formulae that created 
those values. 

When using the Elite* Calc Copy 
command, you may specify a single cell 
or a range of cells to copy. For example, 
you could copy A14:D19 to A20 to get 
calculations for months 4 and 5. When 
Elite*Calc asks OPTIONS (V,N,Q), 
press 'Q,' then answer 'N' to adjust cell 
references B3 and B5, and 'Y* to all 
others. Next, copy A14:D25 to A26 to 
calculate mdnths 6 through 9, and so 
on. 

DynaCalc's replicate is similar except 
you cannot replicate a block. To 
accomplish the block move we just 
discussed, you need to replicate columns 
A, B, C and D separately. That's more 
work in this case, but in other cases, 
DynaCalc lets you replicate a single cell 
to a range of cells, all in a row or a 
column. Furthur, you can replicate a 
column or row of cells to multiple 
columns or rows. 

Now, if we had the features of 
Elite* Calces Copy and DynaCalc's 
Replicate combined into one command, 
wow! VIP Calc's Replicate is just like 
DynaCalc's, except the program asks 
"Relative Y/N" for each cell reference. 

To wrap up this month, I want to 
point out a new version of Elite* ColIc 
has come out to run with PBJ's Word- 
Pak with an 80-character screen. One 
owner I spoke with is very pleased with 
the program; it offers a number of 
upgrades and changes, most important 
of which is the inclusion of vertical and 
horizontal windowing. A borders 
option to provide column and row 
identification on printed spreadsheets 
is also available. The new Zap command 
will blank all cells containing numbers 
while preserving formulae and text. 
This may be neat for blanking out all 
values from a shell you are developing. 
But, be careful, this will wipe out 
constants, LOOKUP tables and the 
like. The disk is copy protected with 
a backup copy provided in the package. 
Check out the ads in this RAINBOW for 
price and availability. 



242 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



1Q& 



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DOWNLOADS 



Securing A Graphics Cache 



By Dan Downard 
Rainbow Technical Editor 



• I am working on a program to draw 
pictures on my computer that I can recall 
on my cassette for later use with other 
programs. My problem is within the realm 
of getting the same picture after I have 
stored and recalled graphics pages one to 
four and the PMODE, SCREEN, foreground 
color and background color. I own a 64 K 
Color Computer. 

Greg Arnold 
Xenia, OH 

Greg, your question is a very hot topic 
due to the popularity of several new graphics 
programs on the market. The immediate 
answer to your problem is quite simple. 
Assuming your graphics screen has been 
saved as a binary file starting at $E00, the 
default address for Extended BASIC graphics 
memory, just run the following BASIC 
program. 

10 PM0DE X,X: SCREEN X,X 
20 (C)LOADM"FILENAME" 
30 GOTO 30 

The variables of 'X' describe the graphics 
mode from which the picture was saved. 
This program appears in the Co Co Max 
manual as an example of displaying the 
PMDDE4 , 1 : 5CREEN1 , 1 screen necessary for 
artif acted colors. 

Let's go a little further, though, Greg. If 
you are interested in accessing graphics 
screens from machine language, how do you 
duplicate the PMODE and SCREEN commands? 
The inputs for the VDG are bits three 
through seven of U4, a 6821 PI A at address 
$FF22. 

To experiment with the different graphics 
modes not available with the PMODE 
command, you need some information on 
the VDG. This information is in the TRS- 
80 Color Computer Technical Reference 
Manual and also in Section IV of the older 

(Dan Downard is an electrical engineer 
and has been involved in electronics for 
25 years "through ham radio [K4KWTJ 
His interest in computers began about 
six years ago and he has built several 
68 XX systems.) 



Getting Started With Color BASIC manuals. 
This information can be summarized as 
follows: 



$FF22-Bit 3 


CSS 


$FF22-Bit 4 


GMO&INT/EXT 


$FF22-Bit 5 


GM1 


$FF22-Bit 6 


GM2 


$FF22-Bit 7 


A/G 



All of the new graphics programs are 
really fun to play with, but compatibility 
of the information is a real problem. The 
above information is the basis of converting 
files from one system to another. Of course, 
the address of the graphics screen is different 
for all of the programs also, and has to be 
converted from one program to another. 

Good luck, and if you come up with any 
good screens, send them to us and we'll 
publish them in the "CoCo Gallery." 



CHIP CHANGE 



• / have a 64K 'E' Board CoCo 1. About 
three weeks after installing 64K, my 
computer locked up. Pressing Reset or on/ 
off results in columns of inversed @'s and 
spaces, and I cannot control the computer. 
Occasionally, turning the computer off for 
a long period of time then turning it on 
and hitting Reset a few times will clear the 
screen and return everything to normal. But, 
after two minutes, the computer locks up 
and the whole thing starts over. 

I noted that removing the 6809 chip and 
turning on the computer results in the same 
screen pattern. Is my 6809 overheating and 
going bad? 

Steve Powell 
Cochrane, Ontario 

Normally, garbage on the screen tells 
me that you have a bad memory chip, Steve. 
Get one spare chip and start swapping out 
the chips on a one-by-One basis. If this 
doesn't work, try the SAM and 6809 chips. 



WRITE-PROTECT PROTECTION 

• For floppy disks in general, and for 
Radio Shack drives specifically, I'd like to 
know if there is a possible failure mode that 
could ruin a disk that has a write-protect 
sticker installed. I use library disks to 
consolidate utility software for transfer to 
other disks and because copies of these 
programs exist on a variety of other disks, 
[do not want to back up these library disks. 
But, I do not want to lose these convenient 
sources of utilities, either. 

Also, I have some purchased software, 
such as DynaCalc, that comes on a master 
disk that cannot be duplicated from which 
runnable copies are created. I'd like to know 
what dangers exist — other than handling 
and dirty heads — that could ruin a write- 
protected disk. 

Dennis Page 
Hawthorne, CA 

According to schematics of the CoCo 
disk system, the write-protect switch in your 
drive is connected to an input on the 
WE) 1793 inside the disk controller interface. 
According to Western Digital, the manu- 
facturer of the WD1793, "a logic low 
terminates the command and sets the Write- 
Protect Status bit." 

This sounds pretty safe, doesn't it? There 
are other problems associated with lost data 
on disks, Dennis, If you maintain these disks 
for archival purposes, I don't think you will 
have anything to worry about. But if you 
use them everyday, just as you mention, 
head wear and handling in general could 
cause problems. 

For programs you use a lot, it pays to 
have a backup. 



WANTS DISK AND UPPER RAM, TOO 

• I have an 'E f Board CoCo with Extended 
BASIC LI and Disk BASIC 1.0. It was 
upgraded by Radio Shack to 32K and by 
me to 64K. I have a 64K Boot provided 
by Skyline Marketing with the 64 K upgrade 
as well as one from the rainbow. I can 



246 



THE RAINBOW June 1985 



open the upper RAM when the disk 
controller is not installed and access it. But 
with the controller in my place, it will not 
access normally. If I run a program to poke 
consecutive numbers into a byte of upper 
RAM, I get the following result: 

Before Poke # Poked After Poke 



2 











1 








2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 








5 


2 


2 


6 


2 


2 


7 


2 


2 


8 








9 


2 



/ would like to be able to use upper RA M 
with the disk. Can you help? 

Richard E. Hawley 
San Francisco, CA 

Richard, you didn't mention what ad- 
dresses you were poking. If they are above 
SFFOO, you will not be able to read what 
you wrote, or PEEK what you POKEd, as this 
is the area of memory reserved for SAM 
registers. Try some addresses between $E000 
and SFFOO. 



THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE 

• Can you tell me where I can get a 
schematic diagram and maybe a service 
manual for the Disk Controller I Card? Do 
you know where I can get a disassembled 
listing of the Disk 1.0 ROM and a good 
disassembler? And also, how does the 6809 
CPU know that the Disk Controller Card 
is connected on power up when the cartridge 
select pin on the card is not used? 

Rick Thome 
East Keansburg, NJ 

Rick, I am going to nominate you for 
an award for the most questions in the 
shortest letter! Unfortunately, the answers 
are not going to be that short. 

Radio Shack publishes a service manual 
for the Color Computer Disk Interface. Ask 
your dealer for a service manual, Catalog 
No. 26-3022. 

Spectral Associates published a ROM 
dissassembly entitled Disk BASIC Unra- 
velled. The set consists of three books, one 
each for Color basic, Extended BASIC and 
Disk BASIC. If you care to try yourself, there 
are several disassemblers on the market. 
Two I am familiar with are the Micro 
Works' 80C and Computerware's Super 
Sleuth. Of course, EDTASM+, from Radio 
Shack, has a disassembler as part of ZBUG. 

Address S80A6 of the Extended basic 
ROM checks the first two memory bytes 
at address*$C000, the beginning of the Disk 
basic ROM. If they are correct, Extended 
BASIC assumes a disk ROM is installed and 
jumps to the disk ROM for initialization. 



RPM OVERLOAD 

• On Page 238 of the September 1983 
rainbow, Dan Downard states he will 
address the subject of adjusting the CoCo 
disk drive RPM in the October issue. I've 
looked in every issue since September 1983 
and cannot find it. 

I've been using OS-9 for three months 
with no problems until now. All of a sudden 
my disks spin at 307. 8 RPM which is beyond 
OS-9 's specifications. Is this speed something 
I can adjust myself and how, or do I have 
to support Radio Shack again? I await with 
baited chips. 

Rick L. Earsley 
Elgin, IL 

Rick, I had a problem finding it myself. 
On Page 294 of the November 1983 issue 
you will find a picture explaining the 
calibration procedure. 

For those of you who don't have this issue 
we will try to explain the procedure. On 
the older TEAC drives, there is a yellow 
potentiometer on a circuit board at the front 
left of the disk drive. This pot controls the 
speed of the drive. While under a fluorescent 
light, or using a speed checking program, 
adjust this pot for 300 RPM. 



• The following diagram shows how to 
install a 27128 EPROM on the latest Co Co 
2 single ROM, two- RAM Board. 

Jump across Jl (an address line), then 
follow this diagram for jumpers J2, J3, J 4 
and J5: 



128K 



L! * I 



64K 

• • • 

Jump Pin #1 to Pin #27 on EPROM 

Douglas Cook 
W. Jordan, UT 

Thanks, Doug. I'm sure there are quite 
a few people who will benefit from your 
hint. 



SWITCH HITTER 

• lam the owner of a 64 K Color Computer 
CD' Board). I have installed my disk 
controller inside my computer and wired it 
all into the circuit board (works just super, 
cleared up a lot of problems), but this 
created a problem I can 't figure out. Vd like 
to know if it is possible to put a switch 
somewhere to detach the Disk basic and 
if it is, where would I put it? I would like 
to be able to just flip a switch to disable 



it, as I would like to use ROM packs at 
the odd time. 

Ralph Hansen 
Nelson, British Columbia 

I would suggest installing a switch in the 
CE line of the ROM. This would disable 
any addressing of the ROM and make your 
system think you are using Extended basic. 



KEYBOARD CONNECTION 

• / would like to hook up a typewriter- 
style keyboard, but they are quite expensive. 
Could I hook up a cheaper keyboard from 
a CoCo 2 to my 'E f Board CoCo? 

Mary Darr 
Grand Ledge, MI 

Mary, the only problem with using a 
CoCo 2 keyboard is the connector is 
different. There are adapters made for this 
purpose. Radio Shack supplied these 
adapters with their keyboard upgrade kits, 
so ask your local service rep where you can 
order one. 



BASIC BOOBY-TRAP 

• lam a S YSOP of a BBS and my problem 
is that when the computer finds an error, 
it throws the caller into basic Do you 
happen to know of a way to achieve an ON 
ERROR GOTO statement? 

Gary Wright Jr. 
Huntsville, AL 

One solution that comes to mind, Gary, 
is to use a program called Superscreen by 
Mark Data Products. It supports full error 
trapping in Disk BASIC. There are several 
other ads for programs that add error 
trapping to BASIC, along with a few 
suggestions in recent rainbow articles. 



CURSOR CURSES 

• Is it possible to reduce the size of the 
blinking cursor on the CoCo? There are 
times when it becomes distracting. 

Norman L. Garton 
Joliet, IL 

Norman, try the following: POKE 
&HR1A6,0 — my cursor disappears. The 
routine for blinking the cursor is located 
at $A199 in your Color basic ROM. 



Your technical questions are welcomed. 
Please address them to: Downloads, the 
rainbow, P.O. Box 385, Prospect, KY 
40059. We reserve the right to publish only 
questions of general interest and to edit for 
space and clarity. Due to the large volume 
of mail we receive, we are unable to answer 
letters individually. 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 247 



Give Your Eyes 
And Fingers A Break! 



With rainbow on tape, you'll spend your time enjoying programs 
instead of typing . . . typing . . . typing them. Each month, rainbow 
on tape brings you ready-to-run programs from the current issue 
of the rainbow (excluding OS-9 programs and any less than 20 
lines long). Think of how your software library will grow. With 
your first year's subscription, you'll get more than 230 new programs: 
games, utilities, business programs, home applications — the full 
spectrum of the rainbow's offerings. 

You will receive as many as two dozen programs a month. Using 
the documentation provided by the magazine, all you have to do 
is load and run them! 




A luxury service at a bargain-basement price: 

rainbow on tape single-copy rate is $10 within the U.S.; $12 for all other countries. RAINBOW ON TAPE 
annual subscription rate is $80 within the U.S.; $90 in Canada; and $105 for all other countries. 

Past Releases of RAINBOW ON TAPE Available, Too! 

If you're among many readers of the rainbow who file every issue of the magazine, expecting someday 
to need a program or article contained within the magazine, past releases of RAINBOW ON TAPE are available 
^beginning with the April 1982 edition (Please check this issue's Table of Contents for "Back Issue Information" 
to review previous magazine themes). 

Music From Past Printer Issues: 

June 1984 — Our first Music Issue featured such classics as Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture," Bach's "Toccata 
in D Minor," Handel's "Hornpipe," and Kuhlau's "Sonatina," as well as such sentimental favorites as "I'm Looking 
Over a Four-Leaf Clover" and "The Entertainer." Also: Larry Konecky's innovative 12-tone composition program 
which is an alternative to traditional methods of creating music pieces, a BASIC program which loads a machine 
language music synthesis program for entry, editing and playing of music, and tutorials to help you become 
familiar with the location and functions of piano keys and guitar strings. Plus, a variety of games and graphics 
programs. 

Other Issues — Our December 1983 issue contained Larry Konecky's "CoCo Composer," a program that 
makes it possible for you to compose in four-part harmony. It also included eight of the most popular Christmas 
carols of all time. Our December 1984 issue included seven more holiday favorites (plus the winning entries 
in last year's Adventure Contest). Our November 1983 issue featured Bach's "Sinfonia." 

The Perfect Companion To Your RAINBOW 

Each edition of RAINBOW ON TAPE is a collection of ready-to-load-and-run programs from the corresponding 
month's issue of RAINBOW magazine. RAINBOW ON TAPE is not a "stand-alone" product, but is intended to be 
an adjunct and complement to the magazine. That is, even if you purchase RAINBOW ON tape, you will still 
need the magazine for loading and operating instructions, rainbow on tape will not run on Dragon or MC- 
10 computers. 

Look for the order card between pages 34 and 35 in this issue* 

To order by phone, call: (502) 228-4492 



ummt) 









i 



a #% 




OS-9 UTIUTY 



OS-9 



This database program keeps track of 
two separate mailing lists — a personal 
list and a business list 



MAIL09 



Many persons who have pur- 
chased the OS-9 operating 
system and the BASIC09 lan- 
guage from their Radio Shack dealers 
have found themselves with a very 
powerful system and not a lot of 
software to run on it, MAIL09 is a piece 
of software to help fill part of the need. 
MAJL09 is a database program 
which keeps track of two separate 
mailing lists — one a personal list and 
a business list, It is menu and prompt 
driven, and thus is very easy to use, 
It also contains operations not found 
in many similar programs such as the 
ability to not only make labels of all 
the addresses you have, but also to 
make multiple mailing labels of a single 

(Tim Harris has a bachelor's degree in 
computer science and is employed as 
a software engineer. Several of his 
programs have also been featured in the 
"KISSahle OS-9 tf column of THE 

RAINBOW.) 



By Timothy A. Harris 

entry. This is nice if you don't like to 
write return addresses all the time - 
just run off a few hundred labels and 
you Ye set. 

MAIL09 also uses an indexed file 
structure so you can locate an item 
quickly and the mailing list is always 
sorted alphabetically for you via a 
bubblesort routine run on the index. 

The two mailing lists can each be up 
to 100 entries long as currently imple- 
mented and each entry conlains up to 
10 fields. These fields are a company 
name for the business list, a last name, 
first name, title, two address fields, city, 
state, ZIP and phone. The last name 
is used to index the personal list and 
the company name is the index key for 
the business list. These two fields can 
contain up to 25 characters: the first 
name up to 10, the title up to four and 



the address fields up to 32. The city 
can have up to 15 characters, the state 
up to 10 if you don*t like to abbreviate, 
the ZIP code can be up to 10 characters 
long for the new nine-digit ZIPs, and 
the phone can handle 14 characters for 
area code and number in a format of 
(XXX) XXX-XXXX. 

MAILD9 is written in BASICQ9 which 
is an ideal language for implementation 
of application programs in the OS-9 
environment. One major advantage of 
basics is the use of user-defined TYPE 
declarations like PASCAL which allow 
the label (that includes the above fields) 
to be a single data item. 

Another advantage of BASICG9 is its 
modularity; the total code for MAIL09 
is very large, too large, in fact, to run 
on the CoCo with OS-9 if it is all in 
one big chunk of code as regular 
Microsoft basic programs are, but 
BASIC09 allows one to make programs 
in separate modules and have these 
modules loaded as needed from disk 
when they are called from another 
module. The modules communicate 
with each other via the parameters they 
pass. 

If you look at the code, you will 
notice there are four main parameters 
used: label, index, listfile and indexfile. 
Since the label is only used within a 
given procedure, it need not be passed 
as a parameter and could be declared 
by a DIM statement in each procedure 
that needs to read or write an entire 
label. This approach, however, takes up 
a lot of space since the label uses up 
quite a chunk of memory. 

I chose to save on this memory use 
by declaring the label only in the first 
procedure and then passing it to all 
others as a parameter, making only the 
main procedure save the memory for 
the label and then all the others need 
only save the address of the label to 
access it. 

The index array is also passed around 
for similar reasons. The listfile and 
indexfile are the actual names of the 
data file you will be using, and lei you 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 249 



; 



work with two separate lists and still 
have only one index file in memory at 
any given time. 

1 would like to make a few technical 
notes first before 1 actually get into the 
operation of the MAIL09. First of all, 
the program requires a Hi-Res screen 
to run, such as those found in Q-Pak 
or that obtained by the PBJ Word-Pak. 
The standard display of the Color 
Computer will just not work; the menus 
would be too large to fit on a single 
screen. 

I used the 64 by 19 display of O-Pak 
to write the program, but the 51 by 24 
would work just as well, and an 80 by 
24 would be great. The use of O-Pak 
gives a nice display at the cost of 
memory - lots of it — which further 
limits the memory available with 
BAS1C09. BASIC09 needs about 22 K to 
load and 0-Puk takes up another 6K 
or so, leaving about 7-8K of workspace 
in RASIC09. 1 can get a workspace of 
9983 with BASIC09 and O-Pak installed, 
but only after eliminating several device 
descriptors and drivers from my boot 
file. 

Due to these constraints, the program 
will not run within BASIC09 itself, but 
needs to run PACKed with the RUNB 
package in memory. The use of the 
KILL statement after RUNing a proce- 
dure helps conserve memory space also, 
by unlinking the data space used by that 
procedure. The program modularity 
also has its drawbacks, although it 
allows a large program to run in limited 
memory, it does this by leaving things 
on the disk until they are actually 
needed, making a program access the 
disk drive a lot during execution. 

If you have standard Radio Shack 
drives tracking at 30 ms, this can cause 
delays, so it is best to have your drives 
tracking as fast as they can (mine go 
at six ms and there is not much delay 
in the program execution), For hints 
on how to make your drives work faster 
or how to get rid of unwanted device 
descriptors and drivers, look into some 
of the past issues of RAINBOW at the 
*'K I SSableOS-9" column. 

MAIL09 consists of 21 separate 
procedures which are PACKed into 15 
modules; to get it up and running on 
your system, it's best to have a disk set 
up with a CMDS (Commands) directory 
for RUNB, the program modules and 
any system utility you might want, 
mainly dir and del. 

If you have a single disk system, you 
would also want to put BASIC09 in the 
CMDS directory so you could edit the 



programs and put the sources in a 
separate SOURCE directory before 
P ACKing them to the CMDS directory. 
Remember, you cannot turn PACKed 
1-Code back to basicgs source code if 
you have to edit it, so always SAVE 
the source code first. 

1 also set up a separate DATA 
directory to hold the Hies generated by 
the program and use it as the data 

The listing: 



directory while running the program. 

When entering the code, I chose to 
PACK those procedures common to all 
of the program into the main module. 
Thus, enter the code for the modules 
mail09, clearscreen, entryerror, getindex, 
printlabel and inputdata all into the 
workspace at one time, then use "run 
mail09" or "list mail09 rt to get that to 
be the current module, and SAVE* 




PROCEDURE mai!09 

TYPE labeltype-eotapanyname: STRING [25]; title :STRING[4]; Inaote; STRING 

[25]; fname:STRlNG[10]; address 1: STRING; address2: STRING; clty:SXRING 

[151; state: STRING [10]; 2ip:STRING[lQ] ; phone: STRING [14] 

TYPE indextype=name: STRING [25] ; number :BYTE 

DIM label: label type 

DIM indent 100): index type 

Ditf ciname l piaaae:3TRrMG[6] 

DIM rlname^plnameiSTRlNGfS] 

DIM resp;BYTE 

clname : ^"c index" 

clname : a '"cllst" 

pins me : ■" pindex" 

plname : =" plls t M 

LOOP 

RUN elearsereen 

FRINT " 



MAIL09" 
List Selection Menu" 



— Work, on Personal List" 

— Work on Bnislness List" 

— Exit to 0S-9 H 



PRINT " 

PRINT " 

PRINT 

PRINT " 1 

PRINT * * 2 

PRINT " 

PRINT 

INPUT " Selection : '\resp 

EDCITIF resp=0 THEN 

RUN clear screen 

ENDEXIT 

IF respKL THEN RUN mainmenuC label, index , plname »piname) 

ELSE IP resp=2 THEN RUN malmaenuC label, Index, clname, ciname) 

ELSE RUN entryerror 

ENDIF 

ENDIF 

ENDL00P 

END 

PROCEDURE elearsereen 

DIM clear code: STRING [ 1] 

clear code :=CHR$($0C) 

PRINT clear code 

END 

PROCEDURE entryerror 

DIM resp:BYTE 

PRINT 

PRINT " Illegal Selection" 

PRINT " Hit any key to Continue" 

GET #Q,resp 

END 

PROCEDURE getindex 

TYPE Index type=name: STRING [25]; number:B¥TE 

PARAM id; INTEGER 

FARAM index{ 100); index type 

PARAM numen tries: INTEGER 

numentriesJ'O 

WHILE NOT(EQF(#id}) DO 

nume at r ies ; :s nument rie s+1 

GET # id, indexCnumen tries) 

ENDWHILE 



250 



THE RAINBOW June 1955 



them and PACK* them into the 
SOURCE and CMDS directory. The 
1+1 will make all the procedures go into 
a single module called mailQ9. The 
maiisort and xchange procedures should 
be similarly SAVE*ed and PACK*ed 
into a module named maiisort. 

All the remaining procedures should 
he PACKed individually into separate 
modules making for 15 modules and 
21 procedures. If you follow this 
procedure, you should be able to run 
the program by getting out of BASICG9, 
making sure your execution directory 
is CMDS and the data directory is 
DATA, then typing "mail09" which will 
bring up RUNB and the main module 
of the program. 

Once you get the program up and 
running, the actual use of it is simple. 
The entire program is menu and prompt 
driven, so it tells you or asks you what 
to do at every step of the way. You 
are first asked if you want to work on 
your personal or business list, both of 
which can contain up to 100 entries. 
Also on the selection menu is the option 
of zero (to return to OS-9); throughout 
the program the option of zero will 
return you to the previous level of the 
program. 

After selecting a list to work on, you 
will go to the main menu where you 
can 1) create the list; 2} update the list; 
3) display the list to the screen; 4) print 
the list to the primer; 5) print mailing 
labels (the program is set up to use one 
wide fanfold labels that are 314 inches 
wide and l5 /, 6 inches high; 6) print 
individual labels and make multiple 
copies of a single label; 71 execute a 
Shell command; and 0) return to the 
selection menu, If you choose to update 
the list, you will see the update menu 
which allows addition of entries, 
alteration of an entry and deletion of 
an entry. At all times you will be told 
what exactly to do or given a menu to 
decide from, so the program is very user 
friendly, 

1 hope MAIL09 helps to bridge the 
gap of availability between having a 
powerful operating system and having 
some powerful software to run on it. 
The source code is rather long and does 
take some time to type it all in, but 
the BASIC09 editor makes it an easier 
and faster job by automatically capi- 
talizing for you and doing a loi of error 
checking as you type. 

(You may contact Mr, Harris with 
any questions about this program at 
6620 Forest Court, Des Moines, I A 
50311, phone (515) 274-2393,) 






PROCEDURE printlabel 

TYPE labeltype=-companynametSTRING[25]; title : STRING [4 ] ; laame:STSJNG 

[25]; fname;STRING[10]; address!: STRING; address2: STRING; city: STRING 

[15]; state: STRING [10 1; zip; STRING [10]; phone ;STRING[ 14] 

PARAM path: INTEGER 

PARAif label: label type 

PARAM dophone: BOOLEAN 

DIM numlines,!: INTEGER 

numlines: K) 

IF label, compauynameO"'* THEN PRINT #path , label .company name 

Humilities : =nurallnes+l 

ENDIF 

IF label. titleO"" THEN PRINT #path,label» title; " "; 

ENDIF 

IF label, faaneO"" THEN PRINT #pa th, label, f name; " M * 

ENDIF 

IF label.lnameO"" THEN FRINT #path , label, Iname 

midlines : -numlines-KL 

ENDIF 

If Iabel»addressl<>"" THEN PRINT tfpath.label.addressl 

numlines : =numlines+l 

ENDIF 

IF label. address3<> M " THEN PRINT tfpath, label. address2 

numlines : =mimliaes+l 

ENDIF 

PRINT #path a label .city 3 ", "j label, a tat e; " " 5 label. zip 

numlines ; "nuralines+1 

IF dophone THEN 

FRINT tfpath, label. phone 

numlines J =numlines+l 

ENDIF 

FOR i:=*uumlines TO 5 

FRINT #path 

NEXT i 

END 

PROCEDURE inputdata 

TYPE label type=company name i STRING [25] ; title:STRING[4]3 lname; STRING 



[25] 1 fname:STRlMG[lO]; 


addressl: STRING; address 2: STRING ; eityiSTRI 


[15]; 3tate:STRING[l0]; 


zip:STR!NG[10]; phone:STRING[ 14] 


PARAM label: labeltype 




PAftAJl listfile:STRING[5] 




PARAM alldone: BOOLEAN 




alldone :=FALSE 




IF listfile="pllst" THEN 


label * eompanyname : =,i " 




INPUT "Last Name 


: ", label* lname 


IF label. Iname*'" 1 THEN 




alldone : =TRUE 




ENDIF 




ELSE 




INPUT "Company Name 


: " , 1 ab e 1 * c ompany name 


IF label •companyname 3 *"" 


THEN 


alldone : *TRUE 




ELSE 




INPUT "Last Name 


: " , label. Iname 


ENDIF 




ENDIF 




IF NOT (alldone) THEN 




INPUT "First Name 




: " >label.fname 


INPUT "Title 




! ",labQl, title 


INPUT "Address 1 




I ", label, ad dress! 


INPUT "Address 2 




t ", label , address2 


INPUT "City 




: ", label. city 


INPUT "Scare 




: " j label- state 


INPUT "Zip Code 




; " jlabel.zip 


INPUT "Phone Number 




: " .label. phone 


ENDIF 




END 





rf£% 



June 1985 THE RAINBOW 251 




OS-9 



KISSable OS-9 



News, Hints 
And Answers 



By Dale L. Puckett 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



We don't have a lot of news this 
month, but we have more 
questions to answer. We'll 
start with a load of hints and we'll wrap 
up the column with a number of 
interesting BASIC09 procedures from 
several readers. 

First, I stumbled upon a long thread 
where members were discussing the 
merits of several alternatives to Tandy's 
CCDISK module and learned about a 
new driver we haven't mentioned 
before. MJS Software (3121 Sea Lane, 
Bremen, IN 46506, (219) 546-4009) 
offers a CCDISK that reportedly does 
an excellent job handling 80-track, 
double-sided drives. 

A lot of the coding was done by an 
OS-9 pioneer, Carl Kreider. Carl is one 
of the leading contributors to the OS- 

(Dale L. Puckett is a free-lance writer 
and programmer who has worked with 
the Motorolafamily of microprocessors 
since 1976. He is the author of The 
Official BASIC09 Tour Guide, pub- 
lished by Microware and The Official 
Rainbow Guide to OS-9, published 
through the Rainbow Bookshelf He 
serves on the InfoWorld Software 
Review Board and is a chief warrant 
officer in the U.S. Coast Guard.) 



9 Users Group's software library and 
is very knowledgeable. If you call MJS, 
tell them they should have let us know 
about it sooner! That goes for anyone 
producing OS-9 software . . . tell us 
and we'll tell the world in "KISSable 
OS-9." 

We mentioned recently that several 
readers were interested in running OS- 
9 on the Dragon computer; while 
reading the SIG, we noticed that Jim 
Omura had left the company's address: 
Dragon Data Ltd., Kenfig Industrial 
Estate, Margam, Port Talbot, West 
Glamorgan, SA13 2PE. Should be a 
good place to write for Dragon 
information. 

Speaking of addresses, Jonathan C. 
Keatley left the following for the 
Dragon's 6551 ACIA: 

$ff04 Receive/ Transmit Data 
$ff05 — Status Register 
$ff06 — Command Register 
$ff07 — Control Register 

Jonathan also left a four-line BASIC 
program that emulates a dumb terminal. 
If you have one of the new RS-232 Paks 
and the new version of OS-9 with the 
A CIA PAK drivers, you should be able 
to emulate it nicely in BASIC09. When 



you do, you'll need to use the corres- 
ponding addresses for the RS-232 Pak's 
registers. See the SysType listing later 
in this column or look in the device 
descriptor for /T2 to find the base 
address of the RS-232 Pak's ACIA. 
Here goes! 

10 POKE &HFF06, &H6B : POKE 

&HFF07, &H36 
20 Y$=INKEY$ : IF Y$< > "" THEN 

POKE S.HFF04, R5C(Y$) 
30 IF PEEK (S.HFF05) fiND B THEN 

PRINT CHR$(PEEK(&HFF04) ) ; 
40 GOTO 20 

Software Library News 

You've probably had a chance to 
peruse the complete listing of the OS- 
9 Users Group's Software Exchange 
Library in the May rainbow. Here's 
some more good news. The list you read 
was complete as of February 1, 1985. 
I've learned that 10 more disks have 
already been added to the list. We'll try 
to get it compiled for you in a future 
rainbow. Dave Kaleita, the group's 
software librarian, has sure been busy. 

MOTD, the group's newsletter, has 
picked up a new contributing editor. 
Hubert "Bert" Schneider in Omaha, 
Neb., has signed on to write a regular 



252 



THE RAINBOW 



June 1985 



Incredible! 



User 68000 



silly 






W9M 



Terminal not included. 



Multi-User! 

Frank Hogg Laboratory announces their 
Quad Terminal (QT) series of multi-user computer 
systems, designed to run Microwares new 
OS-9/68000 operating system. The QT offers 32 bit 
processor power in a compact integrated package 
that requires only a terminal to operate. 



The QT hardware features: 68008 processor running 
at 8 Mhz, 1 28 K bytes expandable to 51 2K bytes, 
an interval timer for time sharing, 4 serial ports 
with selectable baud rates from 300 to 19,200, 2 
Centronics compatible parallel printer ports. Sup- 
ports 2 double sided double density 96 tpi floppy 
disk drives and a SCSI (SASI) bus interface for 
Winchester disk drives. The QT is available as a 
single floppy (1), a dual floppy (2) or as a single 
floppy and a 10 or 20 megabyte hard disk (HD). 
Size 5 1/2 high, 11 1/2 deep, 9 1/2 wide. Can be 
mounted vertically or horizontally. 



Software Included! 

SOFTWARE included is OS-9/68000, the 68000 
version of the proven OS-9 operating System that 
is both disk and file compatible with standard and 
Color computer versions of OS-9. Basic09 is the 
68000 version and is source compatible with the 
6809 version. DynaCalc is the 68000 version of the 
proven 6809 spreadsheet. Stylograph is the 68000 
version of the popular 6809 word processor. Mail 
merge and speller are the 68000 versions of those 
programs. Programming tools included are a 
relocating macro assembler with linkage editor, 
screen and line editors, and an interactive 
debugger. The software has a retail value in excess 
of $2000 and is INCLUDED free! Programming 
languages available and under development 
include C, Pascal, Fortran and Sculptor. 



A Hellava Deal! 

The QT is available in four basic configurations. 
Other configurations are possible and are 
available. Call for price. 

QT1 

128K, single 96tpi double sided floppy and 
all software $1595.00 

QT2 

same as 1 but with 2 floppys $1750.00 

QT HD 

same as 1 but add a 10 meg hard disk $2695.00 



QT HDXL 

same as HD but with 512K $2695.00 



Special Offer 2jfc 

Reg. $2995.00 



512K expansion kit (16 256K DRAMS) $350 
Replace the 10 meg with a 20 meg Add $300 

Note: The QT can hold 2 half height drives internal- 
ly (floppy or hard). Provision has been made for 
hooking up external floppy drives. This allows us- 
ing large capacity full height hard disk drives in the 
QT case with floppy drives in another case. You 
can boot from the hard disk so floppys would only 
be necessary for program transfers and backup. 
Removable hard drives are also available. Call or 
write for complete specifications and prices. 

FRANK 
HOGG 



770 James St., Syracuse, New York 13203 

315/474-7856 




column about the OS-9 Users Group's 
Software Exchange Library. He'll be 
highlighting software in the library and 
reviewing it for you. I received MOTD 
number five recently. It looked great 
and featured an excellent overview of 
OS-9 from Greg Morse, plus at least 
a dozen other good articles. 

But, the group's new editor, Tim 
Grovac, is already preparing another 
issue. We quote: "I need some more 
articles for MOTD. Become famous 
instantly! Help support your Users 
Group! Certainly there must be some- 
thing you all are doing with your 
computers that others would like to 
hear about." Send disk or printed copy 
to: 

MOTD Publishing 
25825 104th Ave. SE 
Suite 344 
Kent, WA 98042 

We still keep getting letters here at 
THE rainbow asking how to join the 
OS-9 Users Group. Once again, her